Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > History Help Forum > Academic Guidance
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

Academic Guidance Academic Guidance - Academic guidance for those pursuing a college degree... what college? Grad school? PhD help?


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old June 8th, 2017, 04:29 AM   #1

Hessian Historian's Avatar
Citizen
 
Joined: Apr 2016
From: Iowa, USA
Posts: 24
Good grad schools for medieval to early modern European history?


In just a couple of months, I will be taking the GRE and beginning to apply to grad schools. My aim is to focus my studies toward European history (especially the medieval to early modern eras). I intend to go for an MA-PhD track, in the hopes of going the funded route. As an Iowa resident, I kind of have my sights set on the University of Iowa and that in-state tuition. However, I would also like to apply to several other grad schools in order to keep my options open.

My first Bachelor's degree (in Liberal Studies) that I earned about a decade ago has a terrible GPA (something like 2.3) because I was young and irresponsible. By the time I start applying to grad schools this fall, I will be in the senior year of my second Bachelor's degree (in History), and will have about a 3.6-3.7 GPA. (I wonder if these circumstances will limit my realistic options for acceptances?)

Which grad schools have good European history programs for English-speakers? I'm looking for any suggestions, from well-known Ivy League universities all the way down to little-known public or private colleges. They can be anywhere in the United States (or Europe, for that matter, if they can accommodate English speaking students).

Last edited by Hessian Historian; June 8th, 2017 at 04:32 AM.
Hessian Historian is offline  
Remove Ads
Old June 8th, 2017, 08:37 AM   #2
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,139

If you are going for a PhD track, it might be useful to delineate your field of interest a little bit more. This will help you both with finding suitable programs, and would help us to suggest a department, as well as increase your chance of getting accepted. Could you tell us which period, region and topic you are interested in and which languages you read or intend to learn?
Entreri is offline  
Old June 8th, 2017, 01:29 PM   #3

Hessian Historian's Avatar
Citizen
 
Joined: Apr 2016
From: Iowa, USA
Posts: 24

Quote:
Originally Posted by Entreri View Post
If you are going for a PhD track, it might be useful to delineate your field of interest a little bit more. This will help you both with finding suitable programs, and would help us to suggest a department, as well as increase your chance of getting accepted. Could you tell us which period, region and topic you are interested in and which languages you read or intend to learn?
My primary area of interest is social history in late Medieval to early Early Modern (might have just invented a new term there) West-Central Europe. I am especially focused on Germany. I have a decent reading proficiency in German and have mastered the old German scripts (Sütterlin, Fraktur, etc.), but not quite fluent yet (studying using Rosetta Stone, mainly).

Last edited by Hessian Historian; June 8th, 2017 at 01:43 PM.
Hessian Historian is offline  
Old June 8th, 2017, 03:09 PM   #4
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,139

I see, I guess you already have an overview over the "usual suspects" (Princeton, Cambridge etc.), so I would say the Universities of York (Medieval History) and Manchester (Medieval and Early Modern History) might be of interest to you, too. Both focus on England and are quite expensive, however. A cheaper alternative would be the "European History" MA program at Humboldt University in Berlin, but it is taught only partially in English and the options in medieval and early modern history are rather limited. If you are willing to attempt a German language MA, I would recommend to take a look at Berlin, Heidelberg and Vienna.
Entreri is offline  
Old June 9th, 2017, 07:10 AM   #5

Hessian Historian's Avatar
Citizen
 
Joined: Apr 2016
From: Iowa, USA
Posts: 24

Quote:
Originally Posted by Entreri View Post
I see, I guess you already have an overview over the "usual suspects" (Princeton, Cambridge etc.), so I would say the Universities of York (Medieval History) and Manchester (Medieval and Early Modern History) might be of interest to you, too. Both focus on England and are quite expensive, however. A cheaper alternative would be the "European History" MA program at Humboldt University in Berlin, but it is taught only partially in English and the options in medieval and early modern history are rather limited. If you are willing to attempt a German language MA, I would recommend to take a look at Berlin, Heidelberg and Vienna.
Thanks! Do you have any recommendations as to grad schools in the United States with good programs for my particular area of study, in addition to Princeton?
Hessian Historian is offline  
Old June 9th, 2017, 08:44 AM   #6

Tulius's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: May 2016
From: Portugal
Posts: 2,849

Fordham University (New York) has some of the best online resources for the Medieval and Early Modern periods.

I have no idea how are their courses, never have been in the USA, but you can inform yourself:

https://www.fordham.edu/info/20759/courses

https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/Halsall/med/medny.asp

https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/sbook.asp
Tulius is online now  
Old June 9th, 2017, 10:21 AM   #7
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,139

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hessian Historian View Post
Thanks! Do you have any recommendations as to grad schools in the United States with good programs for my particular area of study, in addition to Princeton?
I'm sorry, but I don't really have much to say on the US. According to Patrick J. Geary (Medieval Germany in America - Medievalists.net) Harvard and John Hopkins University might be good addresses, too. Incidentally, Geary is professor for medieval history at the IAS in Princeton... :P
Entreri is offline  
Old July 14th, 2017, 01:14 AM   #8

Kirialax's Avatar
Megas Domestikos
 
Joined: Dec 2009
From: Blachernai
Posts: 4,258
Blog Entries: 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hessian Historian View Post
My primary area of interest is social history in late Medieval to early Early Modern (might have just invented a new term there) West-Central Europe. I am especially focused on Germany. I have a decent reading proficiency in German and have mastered the old German scripts (Sütterlin, Fraktur, etc.), but not quite fluent yet (studying using Rosetta Stone, mainly).
This is a very good start. I'd suggest worrying less about programs and more about developing a topic and finding someone you would want to work with. Find some books in your field that really excite you, try to get a sense of why, and see where the authors are teaching. You don't need to go to a big name school, although of course it helps: they tend to have loads of money and will support their students well.

You won't need an exact topic for a while, but when you're making the grad school applications think about what recent books in your field are interesting and why and how you think you can use/move beyond them. This is very much the key to American Ivy academia.

Cambridge is strong in medieval history. The admission process isn't too brutal, and there is funding available, so it's worth looking at. The fall of the pound to the US dollar would probably help you, too, but it's a very expensive place to live. Oxford is less generous with the funding, at least in my experience.

In the case of Princeton, you may also want to look up the names Anthony Grafton and William Chester Jordan.

Do not forget that a PhD is a major commitment. If you don't want to spend the next five-ish years of your life living in the middle of nowhere, then maybe scratch off places like Cornell or Princeton.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Entreri View Post
Incidentally, Geary is professor for medieval history at the IAS in Princeton... :P
IAS is often its own little world. Some professors at IAS come to Princeton's campus regularly and are closely engaged, while others are ghosts.
Kirialax is offline  
Reply

  Historum > History Help Forum > Academic Guidance

Tags
applications, early, european, grad, medieval, modern, schools



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Medieval to Early Modern European History Enthusiast Here! Hessian Historian New Users 8 April 11th, 2016 04:43 PM
Book Recommendations for European Early Modern History Books Earlymodernhistory European History 0 February 21st, 2015 06:21 PM
Any good images of actual layouts for Medieval or Early Modern villages? EccentricOwl European History 0 January 20th, 2014 12:06 PM
Good books on medieval-Early modern history Rja17 History Book Reviews 4 August 24th, 2013 12:51 PM
Best Graduate Schools For European Medieval Archaeology AncientDigger Medieval and Byzantine History 10 December 16th, 2009 06:32 AM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.