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Old February 21st, 2017, 11:08 PM   #1
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Titled British nobility in the US


There was a general in the Continental Army from New York and New Jersey named William Alexander, Lord Stirling. His father James Alexander had fled to America after participating in the Jacobite rebellion of Bonny Prince Charles. James Alexander did not attempt to claim his Scottish title Earl of Stirling. William Alexander was not successful in claiming it, but was known in America as Lord Stirling.

Lord Fairfax, also a Scottish peer moved to Virginia, where he had large estates. A Lord Fairfax was the patron of George Washington and helped him advance in the Virginia militia. He was a loyalist in the American Revolution, had his property confiscated, and received about L13,000 in compensation from Parliament. The title was thought to be extinct, but in 1909, it was discovered that John Kirby Fairfax of Largo, Maryland was the 12th Lord Fairfax of Cameron. He moved to Britain, claimed the title, took his seat in the House of Lords and so on.

I probably am using the wrong terminology for some of this.
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Old February 22nd, 2017, 01:14 PM   #2
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Pre-US VA had a good amount of nobility. William Berkeley is an example (governor during Bacon's Rebellion) - his family's nobilitity predated 1066.
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Old February 23rd, 2017, 11:56 AM   #3
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Pre-US VA had a good amount of nobility. William Berkeley is an example (governor during Bacon's Rebellion) - his family's nobilitity predated 1066.
You mean he was one of the Berkeleys of Berkeley Castle, descended from an Anglo Saxon thane? I once read there were only four families in England, including the Berkeleys, descended from known Anglo Saxons before the Norman conquest in 1066.
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Old February 23rd, 2017, 11:59 AM   #4

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most of the founding fathers were landed gentry. but they renounced this once the USA got independence. This is why they also owned land and slaves, since they had the money to start plantations.
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Old February 23rd, 2017, 03:44 PM   #5
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You mean he was one of the Berkeleys of Berkeley Castle, descended from an Anglo Saxon thane? I once read there were only four families in England, including the Berkeleys, descended from known Anglo Saxons before the Norman conquest in 1066.
Yes. I guess it is not British nobility, is it?
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Old February 24th, 2017, 10:40 PM   #6
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Yes. I guess it is not British nobility, is it?
For centuries the head of the Berkeley family has been a baron or higher noble.

The Scottish Barclay family claims to be a branch of the Berkeley family. One brach founded Barclay's Bank. And another branch produced the Russian gneral Barclay de Tolley in the Napoleonic wars.

Of course a really British noble family would be descended from ancient Britons, and a number of Welsh families do claim descent from ancient Britons.

Last edited by MAGolding; February 24th, 2017 at 11:08 PM.
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Old March 3rd, 2017, 06:07 AM   #7

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An article about British involvement in cattle ranching:

British Gentlemen in the Old West
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Old March 18th, 2017, 06:33 AM   #8
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most of the founding fathers were landed gentry. but they renounced this once the USA got independence.
Landed gentry, but not formal nobility. So nothing to renounce.
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Old March 18th, 2017, 03:29 PM   #9
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Lord Fairfax, also a Scottish peer moved to Virginia, where he had large estates.
Lord Fairfax was actually the only peer to permanently settle in the US during the colonial era. His English estates were centred around Leeds Castle.
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Old March 18th, 2017, 03:57 PM   #10
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Lord Fairfax was actually the only peer to permanently settle in the US during the colonial era. His English estates were centred around Leeds Castle.
As I indicated in the OP, I may not be good with terminology. Lord Stirling was the sole male line heir to a title, but his claim was not recognized.
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