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Old October 26th, 2017, 04:20 AM   #11
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The Dutch and the English were brewing beer in the colonies before the Germans arrived.

The most important German food is scrapple, but you would probably only know of it if your from Pennsylvania or a nearby state. I'd tell you what it is made from, but then you'd never eat it.
Yes, the Dutch and English brewed beer, but all of the great American brewing companies that I named were founded by German immigrants in the late 19th century. I forgot one - Coors.

I know what scrapple is and how it's made, but do you see the contradiction of your statement? How can it be culturally significant (your word was important) if you assume no one knows what it is?
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Old October 26th, 2017, 04:23 AM   #12
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I know what scrapple is and how it's made, but do you see the contradiction of your statement? How can it be culturally significant (your word was important) if you assume no one knows what it is?
Yes, I see the contradiction. Its there on purpose. It was a joke.
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Old October 26th, 2017, 05:13 AM   #13

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Originally Posted by Jax Historian View Post
The Dutch and the English were brewing beer in the colonies before the Germans arrived.

The most important German food is scrapple, but you would probably only know of it if your from Pennsylvania or a nearby state. I'd tell you what it is made from, but then you'd never eat it.
Odd that this should come up. I was just reading about scrapple a couple of days ago. Fried, it sounds rather tasty.
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Old October 26th, 2017, 05:48 AM   #14

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Odd that this should come up. I was just reading about scrapple a couple of days ago. Fried, it sounds rather tasty.
Scrapple is one of the nastiest foods one can eat. It is made up of the gross parts of a pig.

Scrapple is typically made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other trimmings, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are removed, the meat is reserved, and (dry) cornmeal is boiled in the broth to make a mush. The meat, finely minced, is returned to the pot and seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, black pepper, and others are added.[3][4] The mush is formed into loaves and allowed to cool thoroughly until set. The proportions and seasoning are very much a matter of the region and the cook's taste.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrapple#Composition
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Old October 26th, 2017, 06:07 AM   #15
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Scrapple is one of the nastiest foods one can eat. It is made up of the gross parts of a pig.

Scrapple is typically made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other trimmings, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are removed, the meat is reserved, and (dry) cornmeal is boiled in the broth to make a mush. The meat, finely minced, is returned to the pot and seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, black pepper, and others are added.[3][4] The mush is formed into loaves and allowed to cool thoroughly until set. The proportions and seasoning are very much a matter of the region and the cook's taste.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrapple#Composition
My grandfather's recipe for scrapple:
Butcher a pig, remove the pork chops, ham, bacon, and other conventional cuts.
Throw the remaining parts of the pig to the cows. What they don't eat, throw to the chickens. What they don't eat, throw to the pigs. What they don't eat - make scrapple out of.
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Old October 26th, 2017, 06:17 AM   #16

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My grandfather's recipe for scrapple:
Butcher a pig, remove the pork chops, ham, bacon, and other conventional cuts.
Throw the remaining parts of the pig to the cows. What they don't eat, throw to the chickens. What they don't eat, throw to the pigs. What they don't eat - make scrapple out of.
Scrapple should be popular among the Chinese after seeing some of the things they call food.
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Old October 26th, 2017, 07:02 AM   #17

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American society was Anglicized from the start. The Germans who migrated next assimilated rather quickly. Keep in mind, they were basically the first non-British group to migrate in numbers. Then came the Irish. Despite the antagonism between the Irish and native Euro-Americans, the Irish were familiar with an Anglo style society. The immigrants who followed all this - from eastern and southern Europe, and elsewhere - had more of a challenge to assimilate. Assimilation often meant that whatever uniqueness of their culture was lost. My mother's family migrated exclusively from what is now the U.K. and Germany. They had no unique traditions - or even any recollection of from where they had come, unlike my father's family, which consisted primarily of ancestry from eastern and southern Europe. The former's had been long lost.
Irish immigration to the Americas was heavy right from the start, the primary difference from the Irish of the colonial era and later immigrants from Ireland in the 19th Century, was that the colonial Irish were primarily Protestants from Ulster. Catholic immigration to the U.S. from Ireland was mainly limited to the 19th Century.

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A few generations after arriving in Ireland, considerable numbers of Ulster-Scots emigrated to the North American colonies of Great Britain throughout the 18th century (between 1717 and 1770 alone, about 250,000 settled in what would become the United States).[37] According to Kerby Miller, Emigrants and Exiles: Ireland and the Irish Exodus to North America (1988), Protestants were one-third the population of Ireland, but three-quarters of all emigrants leaving from 1700 to 1776; 70% of these Protestants were Presbyterians. Other factors contributing to the mass exodus of Ulster Scots to America during the 18th century were a series of droughts and rising rents imposed by often absentee English and/or Anglo-Irish landlords.
Scotch-Irish Americans
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Old October 26th, 2017, 07:06 AM   #18

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Originally Posted by Wenge View Post
Scrapple is one of the nastiest foods one can eat. It is made up of the gross parts of a pig.

*snip*

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrapple#Composition
It tastes good. That's all that matters.
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Old October 26th, 2017, 08:42 AM   #19

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you can't see the german influence in the early u.s.?
well, they invaded other peoples lands waging war to the east and the west and not respecting treaties, committed a genocide almost exterminating an entire ethnicity and put the remaining one in camps and ended up going to war against the british, how more german can you get?

( in before, chill out guys, it's just an inncent nazi reference joke on an historic forum, i love german people in reality and i apologize to them if they feel offended, we were allied in ww2 so see that as self deprecating humor if you will )

Last edited by gustavolapizza; October 26th, 2017 at 08:48 AM.
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Old October 26th, 2017, 08:44 AM   #20
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Italians gave us pizza. Germans gave us beer - Budweiser, Miller, Pabst, Schlitz, Schaefer, etc. The hotdog used to be called a frankfurter or a weiner - both German words. Hamburgers still have their German name. Something we borrowed from the wonderful German education system: kindegarten.
Kindegarten. I remember that when I was a little child told I was going to go to kindegarten I imagined that it would be outdoors in a garden and I wondered what would happen if it rained.
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