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Old October 26th, 2017, 01:13 PM   #21
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One of my German ancestors contacted me through a medium. He says everyone interested in German heritage should know that the German word for children is kinder.

Fussy Germans are so annoying, especially the dead ones.
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Old October 26th, 2017, 01:33 PM   #22
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German immigration to the US
Interesting that German immigration peaked in age of German economic performance, where you could expect people to be less reluctant to up sticks, and German unification.

'Don't know anything about German migration to the United States, but I wonder if some people simply weren't happy with a centralised state and so migration spiked.
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Old October 26th, 2017, 01:36 PM   #23

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United States of America, great country and thanks to the great immigration of all the peoples of the world that helped to be a great country with its intelligences, where I have my admiration and respect . Live America - Viva América
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Old October 26th, 2017, 01:38 PM   #24
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The immigrants who followed all this - from eastern and southern Europe, and elsewhere - had more of a challenge to assimilate. Assimilation often meant that whatever uniqueness of their culture was lost. My mother's family migrated exclusively from what is now the U.K. and Germany. They had no unique traditions - or even any recollection of from where they had come, unlike my father's family, which consisted primarily of ancestry from eastern and southern Europe. The former's had been long lost.
That is, your culture and traditions thrive and survive not because you're readily accepted and welcomed but the exact opposite is true? ? ?
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Old October 26th, 2017, 04:52 PM   #25
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American society was Anglicized from the start. The Germans who migrated next assimilated rather quickly. Keep in mind, they were basically the first non-British group to migrate in numbers. Then came the Irish. Despite the antagonism between the Irish and native Euro-Americans, the Irish were familiar with an Anglo style society. The immigrants who followed all this - from eastern and southern Europe, and elsewhere - had more of a challenge to assimilate. Assimilation often meant that whatever uniqueness of their culture was lost. My mother's family migrated exclusively from what is now the U.K. and Germany. They had no unique traditions - or even any recollection of from where they had come, unlike my father's family, which consisted primarily of ancestry from eastern and southern Europe. The former's had been long lost.
I think there is a lot of truth to this. My first German ancestor got here around 1700. He moved into western NJ where there were English Quakers, like William Penn next door in Pennsylvania, who welcomed Germans (Protestants). And that ancestor gave his two sons German given names, but his daughters were Mary and Dolly (English). His son's first son was named Henry, not Heinrich. For the next few generations the given names are mixed between English names and German names like Frederick, and the women they married had German or English surnames, and one had a Dutch surname (I didn't know until I looked this up just now that I had any Dutch ancestry). I doubt they were speaking German after 1750.

Those Germans should be compared to the Old World Pennsylvania Dutch who still live extremely traditionally without modern technologies, largely concentrated in Lancaster County, PA. To the best of my understanding, they were sects of the Anabaptist tradition and faced persecution in Europe from both Catholics and Protestants like Lutherans and Calvinists because of their views against infant Baptism. Today's Italians, Irish and Asians still have their ethnic cultural traditions, but they are far, far more integrated than the old Pennsylvania Dutch are.

I'm not claiming what I said is right, it is just my understanding of these Germans. I've only read a little about them and I'm not clear on it.
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Old October 26th, 2017, 06:52 PM   #26

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Interesting that German immigration peaked in age of German economic performance, where you could expect people to be less reluctant to up sticks, and German unification.

'Don't know anything about German migration to the United States, but I wonder if some people simply weren't happy with a centralised state and so migration spiked.
The spike in immigration of Germans in 1840s/1850s was an after effect of the failed revolutions of 1848-1849. Most were liberals that supported the rebellion. A good number of them, particularly former soldiers, were among the 200,000 or so Germans that served in the Union Army during the American Civil.

I wasn't aware there was a larger spike in the 1870s - 1880s, but that does seem to line up with German unification.
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Old October 27th, 2017, 07:43 AM   #27

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'Don't know anything about German migration to the United States, but I wonder if some people simply weren't happy with a centralised state and so migration spiked.
They were mostly interested in owning their own land.
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Old December 9th, 2017, 01:38 PM   #28
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The part of Texas where I live is heavily Hispanic, but the European settlers here, other than the Anglo-Scot ranchers, were primarily Germans who settled in such areas around San Antonio as Fredericksburg (where Admiral Nimitz is from), New Braunfels, Weimar and Waring. In the 70s I dated a girl from New Braunfels. She spoke fluent German. Between us and Houston, there are many Czech settlements which gave us the kolaches which we occasionally nibble at breakfast. Further south, there are some Polish settlements and closer to San Antonio is the community of Castroville which is basically a German-French town (more German than French) where their peculiar Alsatian dialect can still be heard. I was in Castroville one day back then I listened to the Medina Valley High School Band playing the Marseillaise in front of the St. Louis Catholic Church in the town square. I was enchanted.

America is a tossed salad of ethnicities and cultures.

Last edited by royal744; December 9th, 2017 at 01:42 PM.
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Old December 26th, 2017, 07:45 AM   #29
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There are many German and Alsatian settlements in Texas clustered around San Antonio. Between San Antonio and Houston, the area is full of Czech settlements. I understood that German emigrants actually slightly outnumbered English immigrants in the US but I’m not sure of that. In the 1970s I dated a German girl from New Braunfels next to San Antonio. She spoke fluent German. Many of the German settlers here came in through the port of Galveston, Texas prior to the Civil War. A lot of these were German “Free Thinkers” who refused to send their military age children to serve in the Confederate Army. The Confederacy massacred them and to this day no one speaks positively about the Confederacy in these towns and no one ever flies a confederate flag in those town either.

Oktoberfest is big in this part of Texas, especially in New Braunfels and San Antonio. I used to go polka dancing at the Beethoven Maenerchor in San Antonio. The polka became so popular among the Mexican-American community here that they absorbed it into their culture as the “Mexican Polka”.

In Fehrenbach’s excellent book Lone Star he says that in the 1890s in San Antonio, Tx, if you weren’t German, you couldn’t get elected to public office. Most of the older buildings in San Antonio from that time period have German names on them and were designed by German-American architects, although there were a few well-known Anglo-American architects among them.

Admiral Nimitz of Pacific War WW2 fame was born in Fredericksburg, Tx and spoke German as his first language. The Museum of the Pacific War is located in Frederisckburg, Texas as a result.

You just have to know where to look.
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Old December 26th, 2017, 07:50 AM   #30
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That is, your culture and traditions thrive and survive not because you're readily accepted and welcomed but the exact opposite is true? ? ?
Not sure about this. It is quite true that there was a bad reaction to being German during WW1 resulting in a fair amount of discrimination at that time. But during WW2, many German-Americans flocked to enlist in the armed forces after Pearl Harbor.

The German communities in this part of Texas have thrived and are quite popular and prosperous and have maintained their German traditions throughout.
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