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Old December 26th, 2017, 06:53 AM   #31
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Those Germans should be compared to the Old World Pennsylvania Dutch who still live extremely traditionally without modern technologies, largely concentrated in Lancaster County, PA. To the best of my understanding, they were sects of the Anabaptist tradition and faced persecution in Europe from both Catholics and Protestants like Lutherans and Calvinists because of their views against infant Baptism. Today's Italians, Irish and Asians still have their ethnic cultural traditions, but they are far, far more integrated than the old Pennsylvania Dutch are.

The Pennsylvania Dutch aren’t Dutch at all, of course. They are Germans or German-Swiss.
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Old December 26th, 2017, 07:28 AM   #32
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Don't forget that most valuable German contribution, the rifle. Shutzenfest & all that we got from the Germans. The difference is we still got it, the real Germans have their weapons so regulated today, they don't really have a rifle culture anymore.
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Old December 26th, 2017, 09:16 AM   #33

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I think there is a lot of truth to this. My first German ancestor got here around 1700. He moved into western NJ where there were English Quakers, like William Penn next door in Pennsylvania, who welcomed Germans (Protestants). And that ancestor gave his two sons German given names, but his daughters were Mary and Dolly (English). His son's first son was named Henry, not Heinrich. For the next few generations the given names are mixed between English names and German names like Frederick, and the women they married had German or English surnames, and one had a Dutch surname (I didn't know until I looked this up just now that I had any Dutch ancestry). I doubt they were speaking German after 1750.

Those Germans should be compared to the Old World Pennsylvania Dutch who still live extremely traditionally without modern technologies, largely concentrated in Lancaster County, PA. To the best of my understanding, they were sects of the Anabaptist tradition and faced persecution in Europe from both Catholics and Protestants like Lutherans and Calvinists because of their views against infant Baptism. Today's Italians, Irish and Asians still have their ethnic cultural traditions, but they are far, far more integrated than the old Pennsylvania Dutch are.

I'm not claiming what I said is right, it is just my understanding of these Germans. I've only read a little about them and I'm not clear on it.
Just looking last night at the family tree on my paternal grandmother's side, which was basically German (to the US around 1750) and established in Pennsylvania. Don't know why the first one came to the US. My maternal grandfather was pure German; his descendant had come to the US in the 1740s or 50s in a troop of "Hessians" during the Hanoverian era in England. I had thought until reading that that my great grandmother had been Dutch, but I suspect I misheard or misremembered "Pennsylvania Dutch" when I was quite young. She grew up in Northern Indiana which is heavily Amish/Mennonite.

I recently read a sketch of German immigrants around the world--I'll take another look at what the author (Thomas Sowell) has to say about German immigrants in the US.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 06:26 AM   #34
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Don't forget that most valuable German contribution, the rifle. Shutzenfest & all that we got from the Germans. The difference is we still got it, the real Germans have their weapons so regulated today, they don't really have a rifle culture anymore.
Neither do the Germans have the death rate from firearms that Americans do.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 04:20 PM   #35
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Neither do the Germans have the death rate from firearms that Americans do.
Well then, they're not doing it right.

Last edited by Apicius; January 12th, 2018 at 04:23 PM.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 07:31 PM   #36
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Neither do the Germans have the death rate from firearms that Americans do.
I'll support any legislation that only affects criminals. I'll fight any legislation that infringes the 2 nd amendment rights of law abiding citizens. I'll fight any legislation that attempts too make criminals from law abiding citizens.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 07:34 PM   #37
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Neither do the Germans have the death rate from firearms that Americans do.
Because Hitler confiscated most privately armed citizens weapons. Makes it much easier too march them into the gas chambers. So gas chambers didn't count as firearms death. As "Moses" said "From my cold dead hands". Or as many Jews say "Never again."

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Old January 12th, 2018, 08:01 PM   #38

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Because Hitler confiscated most privately armed citizens weapons. Makes it much easier too march them into the gas chambers. So gas chambers didn't count as firearms death. As "Moses" said "From my cold dead hands". Or as many Jews say "Never again."
Hitler did not confiscate most private citizen's weapons, he made it far easier for those he considered 'real' Germans to own guns with the 1938 German Weapons Act. Hitler only restricted weapon ownership for the Jews.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 09:24 PM   #39
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Hitler did not confiscate most private citizen's weapons, he made it far easier for those he considered 'real' Germans to own guns with the 1938 German Weapons Act. Hitler only restricted weapon ownership for the Jews.
How did that work out for them? Better too go out with a weapon in your hand like a warrior than too surrender it & be slaughtered like vermin.
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Old January 13th, 2018, 11:50 AM   #40

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Sorry I'm late to this - some of this may have already been mentioned...

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Iv've read somewhere that the greatest (in numbers) group of settlers coming to the colonies and later to the USA as immigrants were the Germans, actually many more of them than the English or Irish.
The Germans were not in the greatest numbers during colonial times, but they do out number other immigrants over the course of history: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...=0&single=true

Pennsylvania had the highest number of Germans during colonial times and I believe even there they only made up 1/3 of the population.

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This amazes me, because I can't see where their legacy is in the american mind of today (identity, tradition, language etc.).
That's because between WWI and WWII, German culture and language in the US was largely squashed, as Germany was our enemy during both. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-German_sentiment

As for why Italian food prevailed and German didn't even though Italy were our enemies during WWII as well - because Italian food is clearly superior (except maybe when it comes to dessert).
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