Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > American History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

American History American History Forum - United States, Canada, Mexico, Central and South America


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old October 25th, 2017, 01:22 PM   #1
Academician
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 86
American Identity and Tradition


Iv've read somewhere that the greatest (in numbers) group of settlers coming to the colonies and later to the USA as immigrants were the Germans, actually many more of them than the English or Irish.

This amazes me, because I can't see where their legacy is in the american mind of today (identity, tradition, language etc.). I see these things from far away so I could be grossly astray, but it seems to me that people coming from my country (Italians) left a very recognizable mark on what today USA is, both in popular culture (mafia, pizza, etc.) and in the language, even if 2nd generation italians often forget their own original language.
So my questions are:

1) If really this is the case, why?
or 2) this is not the case, Germans left a very big mark on the USA identity and I can't see because I don't know where to watch.
or 3) the Germans came before, so they had more time to blend in the cultural landscape?
or 4) Italians are different so their words, habits or recipes just stand out more?
Bruno is offline  
Remove Ads
Old October 25th, 2017, 03:31 PM   #2

Edric Streona's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Feb 2016
From: Japan
Posts: 2,980

The English and Irish are bigger. Though many English decendents do not identify as such. Or they choose to describe it as “American”. Irish I believe are the single largest group that claim ancestory. Then Germans.

German migration might be hidden due to two world wars in which many German Americans anglofied their names to fit in. Braun became Brown, Schmidt became Smith.
Many places changed from German ones to more English/American ones too as a sign of patriotism... Tuleburg-Stockton, Hanover-Metamora, Berlin-Marne, Bergen- Jersey City, Prinztorp-Chester. German speaking people settled heavily in Pennsylvania I think and many ACW units from there were German speaking.
Edric Streona is online now  
Old October 25th, 2017, 03:38 PM   #3

Lucius's Avatar
the governed self
 
Joined: Jan 2007
From: Nebraska
Posts: 15,966

Click the image to open in full size.
Lucius is online now  
Old October 25th, 2017, 03:42 PM   #4

Belgarion's Avatar
Cynical Optimist
 
Joined: Jul 2011
From: Australia
Posts: 5,804

I think, as Edric has noted, that the descendants of English settlers tend to identify as natives of the new nation rather than as English. Not just in the US, but in Australia, Canada and New Zealand as well. Maybe this is because the English have been the dominant group and their descendants don't feel the need to assert some sort of national identity, whereas the Irish, Scots, Germans etc. have felt they are part of a minority (oppressed or not) and cling to that identity even when it loses its relevance after several generations.
Belgarion is offline  
Old October 25th, 2017, 03:48 PM   #5
Historian
 
Joined: Aug 2016
From: Dispargum
Posts: 1,816

Italians gave us pizza. Germans gave us beer - Budweiser, Miller, Pabst, Schlitz, Schaefer, etc. The hotdog used to be called a frankfurter or a weiner - both German words. Hamburgers still have their German name. Something we borrowed from the wonderful German education system: kindegarten.
Chlodio is online now  
Old October 25th, 2017, 08:22 PM   #6
Historian
 
Joined: Jul 2012
From: Here
Posts: 4,085
Blog Entries: 9

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chlodio View Post
Germans gave us beer
The Dutch and the English were brewing beer in the colonies before the Germans arrived.

The most important German food is scrapple, but you would probably only know of it if your from Pennsylvania or a nearby state. I'd tell you what it is made from, but then you'd never eat it.
Jax Historian is offline  
Old October 25th, 2017, 08:31 PM   #7

Salah's Avatar
Baltimorean
¤ Blog of the Year ¤
 
Joined: Oct 2009
From: Maryland
Posts: 23,286
Blog Entries: 182

Scrapple and beer - if you're a true Marylander, those are just about the only words that will ever matter to you. And this is a state that can claim more or less equal English, Celtic, Germanic, and West-African influences on its ethnicity and culture.

I'll always love scrapple, but I know enough about it to plead that you never tell me anything about it
Salah is offline  
Old October 25th, 2017, 08:52 PM   #8
Historian
 
Joined: Jul 2012
From: Here
Posts: 4,085
Blog Entries: 9

Quote:
Originally Posted by Salah View Post
Scrapple and beer - if you're a true Marylander, those are just about the only words that will ever matter to you. And this is a state that can claim more or less equal English, Celtic, Germanic, and West-African influences on its ethnicity and culture.

I'll always love scrapple, but I know enough about it to plead that you never tell me anything about it
Salah! I haven't seen a post of yours in ages. Good to see you.

I miss scrapple down here (We have the frozen stuff, but that doesn't count). Last May I ate fresh scrapple 3 breakfasts in a row in the Lincoln Diner in Gettysburg PA. I didn't know before then that Lincoln was Amish.
Jax Historian is offline  
Old October 26th, 2017, 03:43 AM   #9

Rodger's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jun 2014
From: US
Posts: 3,480

American society was Anglicized from the start. The Germans who migrated next assimilated rather quickly. Keep in mind, they were basically the first non-British group to migrate in numbers. Then came the Irish. Despite the antagonism between the Irish and native Euro-Americans, the Irish were familiar with an Anglo style society. The immigrants who followed all this - from eastern and southern Europe, and elsewhere - had more of a challenge to assimilate. Assimilation often meant that whatever uniqueness of their culture was lost. My mother's family migrated exclusively from what is now the U.K. and Germany. They had no unique traditions - or even any recollection of from where they had come, unlike my father's family, which consisted primarily of ancestry from eastern and southern Europe. The former's had been long lost.
Rodger is offline  
Old October 26th, 2017, 04:20 AM   #10

LatinoEuropa's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Oct 2015
From: Matosinhos Portugal
Posts: 3,275

Between 1820 and 1970, 446,000 Portuguese emigrated to the United States, most of them from the Azores and Madeira. Among the most frequent occupations were fishing, cotton work and the textile industry.

Today, the Luso-American population already exceeds 1 million people, with the largest concentration in California, with 330 974 inhabitants of Portuguese origin (1% of the state population), followed by Massachusetts, with 279,722 (4.4 %), followed by Rhode Island, 91,445 (8.7%), and New Jersey, 72,196 (0.9%). There are Luso-descendants in all US states.

they took with them the port wine and codfish

_______________________________
In portuguese.

Entre 1820 e 1970, emigraram para os Estados Unidos 446 mil portugueses, a maior parte deles oriunda dos Açores e da Madeira. Entre as ocupações mais frequentes, estavam a pescaria, o trabalho com algodão e na indústria têxtil.

Hoje em dia, a população luso-americana já ultrapassa um milhão de pessoas, sendo a maior concentração na Califórnia, com 330 974 habitantes de origem portuguesa (1% da população do estado), seguida por Massachusetts, com 279 722 (4,4%), seguido de Rhode Island, 91 445 (8,7%), e Nova Jérsia, 72 196 (0,9%). Há luso-descendentes em todos os estados norte-americanos.

Eles levaram consigo o vinho do porto e o bacalháu.

Last edited by LatinoEuropa; October 26th, 2017 at 05:48 AM.
LatinoEuropa is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > American History

Tags
american, identity, immigration, tradition



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
is Hermeticism a greek tradition or egyptian tradition RemGrade Ancient History 6 April 5th, 2016 05:56 AM
Why do you think Native American identity mostly dissapeared in Mexico? HowlingWolf500 American History 72 January 2nd, 2015 06:40 PM
The Beginning of an American Identity heirtothewind American History 24 November 22nd, 2014 10:28 PM
The American Political Tradition: And the Men Who Made it CloakedMistborn American History 1 October 10th, 2012 08:03 AM
Cinco de Mayo: An American Tradition throughthepastdarkly American History 0 May 3rd, 2012 04:59 AM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.