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Old December 4th, 2017, 06:52 AM   #1

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Islands in the Gulf of California


I was looking on google earth, as I normally do, and I noticed a huge amount of islands in the Gulf of California. There really isnít too much information, pictures, or just history in general on them, and Iím really curious and wanted to know more about their history. I really want to know if they are inhabited currently, or if they ever were at one point it history. Thanks!
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Old December 4th, 2017, 09:33 AM   #2

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Originally Posted by PoochieMoo View Post
I was looking on google earth, as I normally do, and I noticed a huge amount of islands in the Gulf of California. There really isnít too much information, pictures, or just history in general on them, and Iím really curious and wanted to know more about their history. I really want to know if they are inhabited currently, or if they ever were at one point it history. Thanks!
You use Google Earth the same way I do.. Exploration.
Those islands, South of the US border are pretty arid.. there is a prison on one of them.. To learn more, You might read the ďLog of the Sea of CortesĒ by John Steinbeck. His life long friend, Doc Rickets wrote the marine life handbook as a result of the same journey. (Between Pacific Tides) still in print.
Also interesting are the Channel Islands off the coast of California. Today they are national parks. No one can live on them except for Catalina.. Google Channel Islands, California.


Further South is a real Jurassic Park Island. Isla del Cocos. 300 miles, South West of Coast Rica, it is covered with jungle. No permanent residents.


You've inspired me to start a Google Earth exploration thread.
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Old December 4th, 2017, 10:11 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by PoochieMoo View Post
I was looking on google earth, as I normally do, and I noticed a huge amount of islands in the Gulf of California. There really isnít too much information, pictures, or just history in general on them, and Iím really curious and wanted to know more about their history. I really want to know if they are inhabited currently, or if they ever were at one point it history. Thanks!
I have been to a couple of these islands when on holiday (went swimming with sea lions - fantastic!).

As far as I know they are nature reserves nowadays so no one lives there; but I have no idea if they had a human occupation historically. A lot of what we saw was pretty bare rock, though. It didn't look like a prime place to live.
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Old December 4th, 2017, 06:04 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larkin View Post
You use Google Earth the same way I do.. Exploration.
Those islands, South of the US border are pretty arid.. there is a prison on one of them.. To learn more, You might read the ďLog of the Sea of CortesĒ by John Steinbeck. His life long friend, Doc Rickets wrote the marine life handbook as a result of the same journey. (Between Pacific Tides) still in print.
Also interesting are the Channel Islands off the coast of California. Today they are national parks. No one can live on them except for Catalina.. Google Channel Islands, California.


Further South is a real Jurassic Park Island. Isla del Cocos. 300 miles, South West of Coast Rica, it is covered with jungle. No permanent residents.


You've inspired me to start a Google Earth exploration thread.

Most of the islands have no real fresh water- so are inherently uninhabitable.

The channel islands off Santa Barbara DO have people living on them...
but very few. Anacapa and Santa Cruz Island to be specific.

the others are pretty much barren, though FOLKS to go out to them by boat and hike them.


the islands in the Sea of Cortez are far less habitable than the Channel islands.
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Old December 4th, 2017, 08:13 PM   #5

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The Channel Islands had Native Americans living there. Russian fur traders introduced diseases and wiped most of them out. I remember reading a book called "Isle of Blue Dolphins" about a Native Girl left alone on San Nicolos for 18 years. One thing I could point out is many small Indian groups had a large territory and moved around seasonally. Attakapas Indians could spend the Summer along the beach in Cameron Parish (Gulf of Mexico Beaches) and move inland where they could hunt animals. The European settlers found lots of mounds of discarded oyster shells as they explored the area.

I think some Gulf of California tribes could visit the lands for several months when the chance of rain was good and then they would relocate to where the seasonal food was coming into harvest. Fishing Villages along the Gulf of Cortez would have also fed a lot of people.

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Old December 4th, 2017, 08:47 PM   #6

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You've inspired me to start a Google Earth exploration thread.
Awesome! That’s actually a really good idea for a new thread.

Thanks for the info, I’ll definitely check out that book.

Which island had the prison on it?

Quote:
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I remember reading a book called "Isle of Blue Dolphins" about a Native Girl left alone on San Nicolos for 18 years.
I remember reading that book in 4th grade, lol

Last edited by PoochieMoo; December 4th, 2017 at 08:52 PM.
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Old December 6th, 2017, 12:18 PM   #7

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Most of the islands are uninhabited but there is a small town on Isla San Josť of fishermen, a phosphate mining operation on Isla San Marcos, and was a salt production town in the recent past on Isla Carmen. Fishermen spend some of their season camping on the other islands.

The perfect book you will enjoy is from English adventurer Graham Mackintosh who spent a few months on Isla Angel de la Guarda, a waterless deserted island, the largest of Baja California's islands. Get 'Marooned with Very Little Beer' c2008 Marooned With Very Little Beer (photos here too). Graham went back in 2013: Guardian Angel Island2013

Since Baja California is a passion of mine, feel free to ask any questions! My personal website: David K's BAJA Adventures

It is a nearly 800-mile long peninsula of history, adventure, and wonder!

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old December 6th, 2017, 01:52 PM   #8

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A new film (The Devil's Road) is under production about a 1905 expedition into Baja and the islands. Many parts are on YouTube...

Isla Raza (seabird sanctuary):

Isla San Martin:

Isla Cerralvo:

Isla Espiritu Santo:
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Old December 6th, 2017, 03:23 PM   #9

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Originally Posted by David K View Post
A new film (The Devil's Road) is under production about a 1905 expedition into Baja and the islands. Many parts are on YouTube...

Isla Raza (seabird sanctuary):

Isla San Martin:

Isla Cerralvo:

Isla Espiritu Santo:
Thanks! Iíll definitely watch the videos and check out the book you told me about. Thanks again for all the info!
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Old December 6th, 2017, 10:05 PM   #10

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El gusto es mio!
Want to read more about all things Baja, the #1 Baja Internet forum (where I hang out a lot) is Baja Nomad - Taking You Back to Baja! go to forums. Click on any subforum or click on Today's Posts (same as here) to see the most recent additions in all the Baja forums, in one place.
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