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Old December 28th, 2017, 01:13 PM   #31

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Can't say about the Union debt, but the US repudiated CSA debt and that wording was written into the 14th Amendment to the Constitution.

Overseas bondholders of Confederate government debt lost everything, but there was another form of CSA debt that remained alive and was still traded on the London exchange at prices from 3 to 8 British pounds until 1871. After that was delisted it still traded for about 1 pound OTC until the early 1880's.

These were the Erlanger Confederate cotton backed backed bonds. They were redeemable in cotton bales and were issued in London in early 1863. Since they were backed by cotton (not promises) holders of them hoped that they could get something back. These are commonly called "Zombie Bonds" and were kept alive by speculators hoping for a settlement of some kind from the USA in court, which of course never happened.

Some of these bonds remained in London bank vaults for more than 100 years and a large hoard of them was sold to collectors in 1987 for more than 350,000 pounds!
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Old December 28th, 2017, 03:15 PM   #32

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Nothing you just said shows that anyone actually burnt the plantation because the man was wealthy. The union destroyed many plantations, usually because they were producing something (cotton, food) that could support the Confederate war effort. So far it seems to be a claim concocted by you, so I'm not going to read several books for something that probably isn't there. But if you provide a quote one of those authors saying that is why the plantation was burnt, Then I'll look into it.
I thought so. Yankee troops burned Plantations, Barns, Slave Quarters and other buildings because they liked to do so. Louisiana once had some magnificent plantation homes that were built before the ACW. Wherever the Yankees went, they somehow went up in flames. They also burnt Union Supporters homes and stole their belongings. Hey, it was okay because the Unionists were supporting the Confederacy? My Great-Great grandmother witnessed the war up close and personal. Union troops raided to the Monroe, Louisiana area from Vicksburg. They came to her farm and stole every thing they could carry off ad took all the area's young Slaves with them. When the older Slaves asked how are we going to eat she told them to follow the Yankees, because they stole all the food.

Partisan Rangers operated along the Mississippi River and often fired on passing US Navy vessels. Admiral Farragut decided that if he could not catch the men who did it, he would bombard Donaldsonville, Louisiana. He did so and even hit the Catholic Church several times. The church has been repaired and is still in Donaldsonville. The statue of Mother Mary is still there missing the fingers on one hand she extends because she was hit by a shell. One of my books showed a picture of the statue.

Google "Union Navy Bombards Donaldsonville, Louisiana" and you will find page 153 in John Winter's book that will describe the incident. I don't think they include the pictures.

I have been studying the Civil War with an emphasis on Louisiana for years. Where do you get your information?

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Old December 28th, 2017, 06:16 PM   #33
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Yankee troops burned Plantations, Barns, Slave Quarters and other buildings because they liked to do so. Louisiana once had some magnificent plantation homes that were built before the ACW. Wherever the Yankees went, they somehow went up in flames. They also burnt Union Supporters homes and stole their belongings. Hey, it was okay because the Unionists were supporting the Confederacy? My Great-Great grandmother witnessed the war up close and personal. Union troops raided to the Monroe, Louisiana area from Vicksburg. They came to her farm and stole every thing they could carry off ad took all the area's young Slaves with them. When the older Slaves asked how are we going to eat she told them to follow the Yankees, because they stole all the food.

Partisan Rangers operated along the Mississippi River and often fired on passing US Navy vessels. Admiral Farragut decided that if he could not catch the men who did it, he would bombard Donaldsonville, Louisiana. He did so and even hit the Catholic Church several times. The church has been repaired and is still in Donaldsonville. The statue of Mother Mary is still there missing the fingers on one hand she extends because she was hit by a shell. One of my books showed a picture of the statue.

Google "Union Navy Bombards Donaldsonville, Louisiana" and you will find page 153 in John Winter's book that will describe the incident. I don't think they include the pictures.

I have been studying the Civil War with an emphasis on Louisiana for years. Where do you get your information?

Pruitt
I don't know what you are babbling about. Where do I get what information? I didn't give you any information. I asked you to quote your sources saying why the Union troops burned the man's plantation and you can't seem to do it. That's all there is to it as far as I'm concerned.

Last edited by Jax Historian; December 28th, 2017 at 06:31 PM.
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Old December 28th, 2017, 07:09 PM   #34

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You will have to live without me jumping up and digging through the books I have here or the ones in the storage locker. If you want me to do your research you will have to send at least a four figure check to get me out of my chair. Even when I back up my post you will say it is not enough and you want something else. Go play your games somewhere else. If you don't like my posts, ignore them like I will ignore your's now

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Old December 28th, 2017, 07:29 PM   #35
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You will have to live without me jumping up and digging through the books I have here or the ones in the storage locker. If you want me to do your research you will have to send at least a four figure check to get me out of my chair. Even when I back up my post you will say it is not enough and you want something else. Go play your games somewhere else. If you don't like my posts, ignore them like I will ignore your's now
You sound pretty disturbed that I asked you for evidence to support your claim that New Englanders burned a black man's plantation because they were jealous he was rich. I can't imagine why it is troubling you so much.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 11:47 AM   #36

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Calm down, guys! Let's not start another Civil War over this.

History reference books aimed at more general audiences (even if well researched and written) may not contain all the details of military action within a certain state or theater of the war. Regional history works usually do.

I have a copy of John Winters' book "The Civil War In Louisiana" and the details of what happened in Donaldsonville, LA are indeed mentioned on page 153. I picked up a copy of that book and another one "Through The Howling Wilderness" describing the 1864 Red River Campaign and the battle of Mansfield, LA when my wife and I visited the Mansfield battle park in 2010 on our way back to Austin from New Orleans.

Details about campaigns in Texas like Sabine Pass (1863), Galveston Island (1862-1863) and the last land battle of the Civil War (Palmito Ranch, May, 1865) can usually be had only by reading titles available by Texas authors through the University Of Texas Press in Austin.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 12:27 PM   #37
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I have a copy of John Winters' book "The Civil War In Louisiana" and the details of what happened in Donaldsonville, LA are indeed mentioned on page 153.
We are not discussing Donaldsonville. We are discussing this...

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The most expensive plantation in Louisiana was located by Natchitoches, Louisiana. It was owned by a Free Black. It was run by over 100 Slaves. When General Banks decided to go back down the river after the Red River Campaign failed, the Yankees burned the place. Seems like the New England troops did not approve of a Free Black being rich.
What does Winter say about this incident in Natchitoches? Does he say the plantation because it was owned by a rich black man? If so, what documentation does he use to support it? (e.g. a quote from someone?)
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Old December 30th, 2017, 01:36 PM   #38
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What does Winter say about this incident in Natchitoches? Does he say the plantation because it was owned by a rich black man? If so, what documentation does he use to support it? (e.g. a quote from someone?)
You are right. They just burnt plantation houses and all sorts of other stuff. They probably didn't pay attention tothe owners' race, ethnicity, political orientation or whatever.
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Old December 30th, 2017, 03:31 PM   #39
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They just burnt plantation houses and all sorts of other stuff.
When and where are you talking about? What percentage of the main plantation houses were burned of all the plantations Union troops encountered?
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Old December 30th, 2017, 03:50 PM   #40
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When and where are you talking about? What percentage of the main plantation houses were burned of all the plantations Union troops encountered?
I didn't say anything about percentages. I have heard that most plantation houses in English northern LA were destroyed, but some in south LA remain. That is in total, not of those encountered by Union troops. Has there been any study of how many plantation houses were destroyed or what percentage of those encountered by Union troops were destroyed?

They followed basically the same approach in the east, so I would assume it was policy. It could have been worse, as there were no large scale massacres of civilians or POWs.
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