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Old December 29th, 2017, 10:45 AM   #11

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@ GogLais
" It’s curious that native populations all over the world seem to have been wiped out by imported ‘European’ diseases but the opposite doesn’t seem to have happened"

The black plague came from central Asia , syphilis from the America , the plague of Justinian and before that the plague which decimated Athene during the Peloponnese war are not sourced
tuberculosis and smallpox are liked to cattle herders

like foodstuffs ,germs are exchanged and find new habitats
germs and steel have been written as the twins of conquest
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Old December 29th, 2017, 11:43 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ichon View Post
Interesting- this has been one of those historical mysteries I've been following for quite awhile. So many of the early settler and trade ship accounts mention large drops of native populations and a very few mass graves have been identified but no consensus agreement on what caused the mass deaths which were repeated in the Missippi valley a few generations later.
Smallpox would be the first suspect, but Narragansetts who somehow survived both the 1616-19 plague and another one in 1633 were clear that the second was a 'pox,' with symptoms very different from the first.

Speaking of the Mississippi valley, apparently Conquistador armies liked to travel with large herds of swine swirling around the perimeter, to be used for food when necessary. However, in The Hernando de Soto Expedition, 'Ann Romenofsky and Patricia Galloway suggest that millions of Native people died because they lacked previous exposure to swine borne diseases, This previous exposure was critical in building their immune systems against the deadly diseases. These diseases include brucellosis, anthrax, leptospirosis, tuberculosis, trichinosis, cysticercosis and various strains of flu.' (more)

A strain similar to the Spanish flu may have decimated whole villages.
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Old December 30th, 2017, 04:36 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sparky View Post
.
@ GogLais
" It’s curious that native populations all over the world seem to have been wiped out by imported ‘European’ diseases but the opposite doesn’t seem to have happened"

The black plague came from central Asia , syphilis from the America , the plague of Justinian and before that the plague which decimated Athene during the Peloponnese war are not sourced
tuberculosis and smallpox are liked to cattle herders

like foodstuffs ,germs are exchanged and find new habitats
germs and steel have been written as the twins of conquest
Yes but. I’m not an expert on the matter but as far as I’m aware the native populations in some parts of the world were pretty well wiped out by diseases that Europeans brought with them. The Black Death still left about 50% of Europe’s population alive. The suggestion above re things like swine-borne diseases is interesting.
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Old December 30th, 2017, 06:23 AM   #14
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It could just be that the "visiting" culture would have the advantage in these exchanges. A small number of people would come in contact with a relatively large population, of differing ages and health conditions, and whatever they brought could spread at will. Whatever bugs the visitors picked up might have run their course or killed their hosts by the time the return voyage was completed.
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