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Old January 12th, 2018, 03:23 PM   #1
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The election of 1876


1. Did the Democrats steal the election, only to have the Republicans steal it back?

2. Do I have to spell out what I''m talking about?

3. Can you tell me without looking it up about every time since 1823 a POTUS
has failed to get a PLURALITY of the popular vote?
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Old January 12th, 2018, 04:14 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by outlier View Post
1. Did the Democrats steal the election, only to have the Republicans steal it back?

2. Do I have to spell out what I''m talking about?

3. Can you tell me without looking it up about every time since 1823 a POTUS
has failed to get a PLURALITY of the popular vote?
1 No Tilden almost certainly won the electoral college but the electoral commission had one more Republican on it than Democrats so the two sides made a deal where the Democrats would let Hayes be President even though he probably lost in exchange for the end of Reconstruction and some other concessions described below. T

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compromise_of_1877

2 No.

3)Sure

a 1824-America was a one party state and 4 major candidates ran, so none got a majority of the electoral vote, meaning the top three go to the House. Henry Clay the candidate with the least votes threw his support to John Quincy Adams even though Jackson had done better in the states Clay had won. While people deemed this "the corrupt bargain" because Henry Clay was made Secretary of State, it was also because Clay was closer ideologically to John Quincy Adams. This election spelled the beginning of the end of America's brief stint with a one party system.

b 1876-explained above.

c 1888-Ben Harrison simply got less votes than Grover Cleveland did, while eking out a 1% win in New York. Back then New York was like the Florida or Ohio of Presidential Elections on steroids given it's large electoral slate and it's tendency to be a very close state. Four years earlier Cleveland won New York and the Presidency by about 1000 votes and if he'd lost he would have won the popular vote and lost the electoral college that cycle as well.Similar close razor thin races in New York could have allowed the loser of the popular vote to win the electoral college in 1844 and 1848.

And I think describing the last two cases in any detail would be breaking the post 1991 rule. I will say this though aside from last years election and 1888 all the other cases are ones where the winner of the popular vote probably(or at least possibly) won the electoral college as well and in 1824 the recognized winner of both the popular vote and the electoral vote was stripped of the Presidency as well.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 04:35 PM   #3
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1860 - in a four man race, Lincoln won a majority of the electoral college while taking only about 40% of the popular vote.

1912 - Woodrow Wilson won with less than half the popular vote because Taft and Teddy Roosevelt split the Republican vote.

1992, 1996, 2000, and 2016 the winner of the electoral college (and therefore the election) took less than half of the popular vote.

Last edited by Chlodio; January 12th, 2018 at 04:48 PM.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 05:50 PM   #4
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There were three southern states that were disputed and were awarded to the Republicans. Probably they really went Republican, but there were issues of who could vote, and KKK and federal troops influencing the elections.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 06:22 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chlodio View Post
1860 - in a four man race, Lincoln won a majority of the electoral college while taking only about 40% of the popular vote.

1912 - Woodrow Wilson won with less than half the popular vote because Taft and Teddy Roosevelt split the Republican vote.

1992, 1996, 2000, and 2016 the winner of the electoral college (and therefore the election) took less than half of the popular vote.
Lincoln and Wilson both got a plurality of the popular vote. There's many more elections where people failed to get a majority.

Last edited by EmperoroftheBavarians43; January 12th, 2018 at 06:24 PM.
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Old January 16th, 2018, 03:17 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by betgo View Post
There were three southern states that were disputed and were awarded to the Republicans. Probably they really went Republican, but there were issues of who could vote, and KKK and federal troops influencing the elections.
The blacks were often disenfranchised in those states and the Republicans made two wrongs into a right, capisce?
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Old January 16th, 2018, 04:55 AM   #7
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The blacks were often disenfranchised in those states and the Republicans made two wrongs into a right, capisce?
It is more complicated. Those were 3 southern states with high black populations, 2 of which were the only states still occupied by federal troops. The others went Democrat, but had mostly gone Republican in 1872. Blacks generally could vote, and some whites could not vote due to refusal to take a loyalty oath etc. The KKK, White League, etc. were terrorizing blacks to keep them from voting.

All three of the disputed states reported Tilden had one. There were massive irregularities, as well as voter intimidation. For example, South Carolina reported votes of 101% of the eligible voters. Also, in some states, one state official certified Democratic electors and another Republican electors.

A Commission voted 8 to 7 that all three states went Republican, resulting in Hayes winning by 1 electoral vote. The Democrats excepted this in exchange for the end of military occupation in South Carolina and Louisiana.

The Compromise of 1876 has been considered to have sold out the blacks and Reconstruction. However, in most areas blacks continued to vote into the 1890s. In deep southern states with large black populations, many were prevented from voting started in the 1870s. In Constitutions passed in the 1890s plus or minus a few years, blacks and in some cases poor whites were disenfranchised. Most of the Jim Crow legislation was passed in the 1890s.
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