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Old February 10th, 2018, 05:38 PM   #1
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Musket with a Templar Cross and name carved in the stock


I have an old musket that was hung above my dad's fireplace for as long as I have been here. After he passed away, I now have it and am a bit curious as to the history of it. If anyone has any information, it would greatly appreciated.
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Old February 10th, 2018, 07:08 PM   #2

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For the best results, you need have our members see the firearm in as great a detail as possible. Make measurements of the barrel length, and the weight of the piece. Look for stamps into the metal, most likely near the breach. What kind of firing mechanism is there? The carving in the stock isn't all that uncommon. The cross isn't necessarily a Templar Cross, after all the Templars existence ended long before firearms were common.

What family stories about the musket are there? When did the the family move to Newfoundland, and from where? Was the family engaged in trade with the Indian tribes of Canada? Is McFarline a name associated with your family? The spelling doesn't have to be exact, a hundred years ago there was room for creative spelling.

Just a guess, but I'm guessing your musket, if that is what it is, is no earlier than the 18th century, but perhaps as late as the late 19th century, a span of about a hundred years. You've said "musket", so we infer there are no lands and grooves in the barrel, and that its a muzzle-loader. Is that correct?
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Old February 11th, 2018, 12:29 AM   #3

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherman View Post
The carving in the stock isn't all that uncommon. The cross isn't necessarily a Templar Cross, after all the Templars existence ended long before firearms were common.
Underlined.

Nor they were the only ones to use this kind of crosses. I think that it can be seen as a variant of the cross pattée (cross with foots):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_patt%C3%A9e
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Old February 11th, 2018, 02:35 AM   #4

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The name suggests a British origin but we'd need to see the rest of the musket to try and get an idea of its age. The cross could be a simple mark of a puritan faith.
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Old February 11th, 2018, 02:47 AM   #5

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.
Is the Gun a flintlock or a percussion cap type ?
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Old February 11th, 2018, 06:32 AM   #6

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I intended, and thought I asked for more photos detailing the weapon from multiple angles, and with close ups of things like the firing mechanism. Whether "wheel-lock" or "center fire cartridge", the firing mechanism is essential in narrowing the date of origin. Stamp marks give us clues as to who and where the piece was manufactured, and if there is a serial number on more than one part of the piece we might narrow it down to at least the exact year it was made, and whether its all original, or a marriage of parts. Photos good place to find the initial clues needed to seriously research the item.

The name carved into the stock doesn't tell us much more, than that the piece once had an owner with that that name. The "H", and "s" might be anything at this point.
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Old February 12th, 2018, 03:12 PM   #7
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I have little information on the origins of this musket. It is a muzzle loader. The hammer is missing. My dad obtained it via a trade. And he is passed away now so I have no way of knowing where it came from originally. I will post more detailed pictures. I appreciate the feedback.
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Old February 12th, 2018, 04:13 PM   #8
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Some more Pictures
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Old February 12th, 2018, 04:44 PM   #9

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Looks like a percussion cap musket. So 1830s or after. In the US it becomes more standard after the 1840s

The name is McFarline? Could be American or British. Might want to look at some honor rolls of the Texas wars.
The cross is most likely nothing to do with templers.

Sorry. Just noticed youre in Canada.

Last edited by Edric Streona; February 12th, 2018 at 04:48 PM.
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Old February 12th, 2018, 04:55 PM   #10

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Not knowing from whence it came, it might have come from almost anywhere. I agree that sure looks like a firearm made to use a percussion cap, though I think the piece isn't that old. I would guestimate it at mid-19th century. Mexican War 1847-48? There's a good chance it is American, and so we might look to Harper's Ferry stocks. First though, we need the stamping which should narrow the possibilities a lot. It might, for instance tell us if the piece was sold to the US Army, or to a private party. What are the marks?
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