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Old July 13th, 2018, 12:43 PM   #1
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The 4th july 1776 and religions


Hello everybody.What were the importances (statistics) of the religions at the moment of the independance of the USA in 1776 ?
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Old July 13th, 2018, 01:09 PM   #2
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Not sure if there are statistics. Most of the delegates were Anglican, Congregationalist, or Presbyterian. At the end of British rule New England had established Congregationalism, and everywhere else was established Anglican, including New York, which was originally Dutch Reform, and Maryland,which was originally Roman Catholic. There was a significant percentage Dutch Reform in New York and New Jersey. Pennsylvania had Quakers and German Lutherans and Mennonites. There was less than 1% Roman Catholic, and less Jewish than that.

Numbers of Baptists and Methodists were growing, but they were sort of underground, as many who were officially Anglican were really Baptist. By the early 19th century, the vast majority in the south were of one of those two religions.

The Anglican Church had a high percentage before the war, but it was mostly destroyed by the Revolution. Anglicans were mostly loyalists and many left for Canada, Bermuda, etc. It had a bad reputation with many for British and Catholic sympathy. Ever since, it has been small and had the reputation of the religion of the elite.

In the 20th and 21st centuries, Anglican/ Episcopal, Presbyterian, Dutch Reform, Congregationalism, and Unitarianism all have the reputation of being elite. Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Baptist, and Methodist are more numerous.
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Old July 13th, 2018, 01:12 PM   #3
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Congregationalist - 20%
Presbyterian - 18%
Baptist - 15%
Anglican/Episcopal - 15
Quaker - 9
Lutheran - 4
Methodist - 2
Roman Catholic - 1.7
Jewish - .2%
Only about 10% of all Americans regularly attended church services. The source below lists other faiths but these are the main ones. Numbers cited here are the number of congregations, not church memberships, but the author assumed all congregations were about the same size or would average out that way.


https://www.researchgate.net/publica...tical_Portrait

Last edited by Chlodio; July 13th, 2018 at 01:16 PM.
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Old July 13th, 2018, 02:29 PM   #4

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In the rural areas churches with pastors were often not available. The Methodists began the tradition of circuit riders and revivals in the U.S. which led to a spiritual renewal, but this was primarily after the following the establishment of the USA.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circuit_rider_(religious)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wesley
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Great_Awakening
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Great_Awakening
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Old July 14th, 2018, 12:17 AM   #5
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Thank you very much;it is very interesting.When you say Dutch Reform,you significate Calvinist,and when you say Presbyterian,you significate John Knox,student of Calvin ?
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Old July 14th, 2018, 04:03 AM   #6
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The Presbyterians and Congregationalists are both derived from Calvinism. Doctrinally there's little difference between the two. Most of the differences are in the way the churches are organized and governed. Congregationalists put more power in the hands of the congregations. Presbyterians put more power in the upper church hierarchy.
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Old July 14th, 2018, 04:11 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chlodio View Post
The Presbyterians and Congregationalists are both derived from Calvinism. Doctrinally there's little difference between the two. Most of the differences are in the way the churches are organized and governed. Congregationalists put more power in the hands of the congregations. Presbyterians put more power in the upper church hierarchy.
Presbyterian refers to the minister. It is Church of Scotland, and does not have any church hierarchy. The English Civil War / War of the Three Kingdoms started when Charles I with a Roman Catholic wife tried to make the Church of Scotland have bishops and use the Church of England prayer book, which Scots considered the mass in English.

Dutch Reform and Congregationalist are also Calvinist. Congregationalist congregations would vote on things. They believed in power to the Congregation, as opposed to Presbyterians, where the ministers would meet and vote on things.
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Old July 14th, 2018, 04:59 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by betgo View Post
Presbyterian refers to the minister. It is Church of Scotland, and does not have any church hierarchy. The English Civil War / War of the Three Kingdoms started when Charles I with a Roman Catholic wife tried to make the Church of Scotland have bishops and use the Church of England prayer book, which Scots considered the mass in English.

Dutch Reform and Congregationalist are also Calvinist. Congregationalist congregations would vote on things. They believed in power to the Congregation, as opposed to Presbyterians, where the ministers would meet and vote on things.

Those meetings of ministers are the hierarchy I was referring to. In the US all of the Presbyterian churches in the same locality belong to a presbytery. Only the presbytery has the authority to ordain ministers. The presbytery also owns all its church buildings although each congregation pays their own operational and maintenance costs including the salaries of the minister and any other employees. Rights of ownership can sometimes be a contentious issue between congregations and their presbytery. The presbytery performs many of the same functions as a bishop or diocese in the Catholic Church although certainly the Catholic structure is far more rigid. The Presbyterian organization is more democratic than the Catholic organization.
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