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Old January 6th, 2011, 06:08 PM   #11

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The photos were taken by Alexander Gardner in 1867 and are amazing.

Mushroom Rock on Alum Creek, Kansas. 7 Miles east of Fort Harker & 496 miles west of St. Louis Mo. 1867

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The escort at Indian Cave on Mulberry Creek, Kansas. 11 Miles north east of Fort Harker & 494 miles west of St. Louis Mo. 1867

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Devils Bake Oven on Alum Creek, Kansas. 7 Miles east of Fort Harker & 496 miles west of St. Louis Mo. 1867



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Old January 8th, 2011, 03:20 PM   #12

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I guess you could call this thread a Virtual Tour of the Kansas portion of The Smoky Hill Trail, and area along the Kansas Pacific Rail Road. I will try to use first hand acounts as much as possible along the BOD, The notes of Howard Raynesford from The Raynesford papers will be used also, if not for Howard many of these locations along the trail would have been lost forever.

Click the image to open in full size.


If anyone has any questions as far as how to get to any of these places just ask, the state of Kansas does not promote any of this, if it is preseved, it's by small town Hisorical societys, so as these small western Kansas, towns wither away so do the few remaining ghost's of a not to long ago past. I am no expert not a Historian by any means, none of this information is new but it does put the story in the landskape.

I wonder if Custer would have been held here? When he left Fort Wallace, Kansas, during the cholera epidimic, and rode the 225 miles back to Harker. 1867 July 15th he leaves an under maned Fort Wallace, that had plenty of hostile Indians all around it in 67 and arrives at Fort Harker july 19th. He would have rode in on the road in front of the guard house to the stables. This was as far west as the Kansas Pacific had gotten that summer of 1867. On the first page of this thread the second Photo from the bluff above Castle Rock, had you been siting there that july you would have seen Custer and his men beatin feet up the old Smoky Trail right by the Castle.

Fort Harker 1867, Alexander Gardner.

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A few pics inside the Guard House, picture a 100 degree, humid, Kansas, summer in one of the cells with four huge stable barns right behind you, I guess you would have learned to like the smell of horse and mule.

The display cases have items excavated, I believe they dug out the privys.

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They might not have been useing smokeless powder back in the day but my god they were throwing around some lead.

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Ranche at Clear Creek, Kansas. (Formerly an overland stage station) 498 miles west of St. Louis Mo. 1867, the closest station to Harker, and one of the only old BOD station pics I have ever seen of the trail not in a town. Most of them were burned only one still stands in far west Kansas, many were just dugouts with corrals. three to six men per station. Low pay and a good chance to be killed, which was the job discription for most out here at that time.


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Group with tame elk at ranch on Clear Creek, Kansas. 498 miles west of St. Louis Mo. 1867, Alexander Gardner.


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Kansas, had Elk all over it at that time along with the Buffalo, Pronghorn, and Deer. There was very little left alive on these plains after Manifest Destiny took full effect. Kansas did not even have enough of a Deer population left to support hunting until a season was enacted in 1966, two small herds of Elk are now maintained, one on Fort Riely's reserve and out in the south west corner of the state. A few private Buffalo herds here and there, and a huge ranch bought by Ted Turner in the Red Hills of south central Kansas near Medicine Lodge, he has some big herds that can give you that feeling of what it must have been like.

The pic below is not on the trail but relates to the above. This sign is about fifty miles north of the trail about five miles off the Colorado border in Cheyenne county, Kansas. Tobe Zweygardt, is one of those local historians who has tried to keep these places and stories alive, he has put up markers all across the Arickaree Breaks in Cheyenne County. Google old Tobe if you get a chance.

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Back to the area around Fort Harker, this thing is kind of a bear to put together so I apologize if it comes a little slow, and I hope it's some what coherent.


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Top right the trains still pull West along the Smoky


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Next stop the cow town Ellsworth, in the cattledrive days it was known as Skagg town.


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Old January 8th, 2011, 04:24 PM   #13

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From the Raynesford Papers. These are the stage stops on the Kansas portion of the trail. The Trego county station above Threshing Machine canyon is a massacre site and we will make a stop there a little later. About 8 to 12 miles between stage stops.


Ellsworth County
Ft. Ellsworth (Old) Sec. 2-16-8 and SE 35-15-8

Ft. Ellsworth SE 27-15-5 (Ft. Harker)

Buffalo Creek SE 31-14-9 later SE 10-15-9


Russell County
Wilson's Creek 21-14-11

Bunker Hill NW 18-14-12 (Hick's)

Fossil Creek 30-14-13

Forsyth Creek SW 21-14-15 Abandoned favor Fletcher (Walker Creek)


Ellis County
Ft. Fletcher SE 27-14-16 (Old Ft. Hays) (Forks Big Creek)

Big Creek NE 5-15-17

Lookout SE 36-14-19

Ruthden NE 2-15-20 Abandoned favor (Louisa Springs) Stormy Hollow


Trego County
Stormy Hollow SE 25-14-21

Blufton SE 22-14-22 Abandoned favor (Threshing Machine White Rock Canyon)

White Rock NE 19-14-22

Downer NW 15-14-22 Made a fort later

Ruthton NE 2-14-25 Not used long

Castle Rock NE 31-13-25


Gove County
Grannell Springs SE 23-14-27

E.M. Beougher C 29-14-27 W.P. Harrington

Chalk Bluff NW 13-15-29

Carlyle 15-15-30 (Bridgins Reisen)

Monument SW 33-14-31 Made a fort later


Logan County
Smoky Hill 4-14-33 (Four Crossings)


Eaton S 1/2 22-13-35 Beougher (Russell Springs) W 1/2 23-13-35 Wm. Schutte

Forks Smoky Hill SE 11-13-36 Not regular station

Henshaw Springs 15-13-37


Wallace County
Pond Creek E 1/2 26-13-39 Original site

NW 26-13-39 2d site after railroad came

Goose Creek NE 9-13-40 Not regular station at first

Willow Creek E 1/2 15-13-41 (Fitch's Meadow)

Blue Mound SE 18-13-42 (Big Timbers)




The first trail surveyed (1859-60) and first used trail, probably by W. H. Russell and Stage Coaches, coincides with Smoky Hill SOUTH from Missouri River to Lake Station (NE 27-9-56) except that it followed along the Smoky in Russell, Ellis and Trego Counties. Then over Smoky Hill NORTH to Godfrey, then almost due west to crossing of Kiowa Creek 5 miles north of Kiowa, thence northwesterly to headwaters of Sampson Gulch and down Gulch to Cherry Creek at Twelve-Mile House. N to Parker to Denver between Cherry Creek and Highway 83. Later it followed the ridge from headwaters of Sampson Gulch to Nine-mile House and thence into Denver.
      • --Gleaned from Margaret Long's "Smoky Hill Trail"
This pic is jumping ahead about a 130 miles west, but is taken from where Monument station sat. Monument Rocks is spoken of often in old journals of traveling this trail.

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This is hands down one of the best books on the Smoky Hill Trail, I believe it is back in print now, I highly recomend it.



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Old January 9th, 2011, 02:48 PM   #14

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Ellsworth.


Once called "The Wickedest Cattletown in Kansas", the city is named for Fort Ellsworth, which was built in 1864. Due to speculation on imminent railroad construction, the population of Ellsworth boomed to over two thousand by the time it was incorporated in 1867 ""Abilene, the first, Dodge City, the last, but Ellsworth the wickedest".

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It was said that "Ellsworth has a man every morning for breakfast!" Wild Bill Hickok ran for Sheriff in 1868, but there were many equal to the calling in frontier Ellsworth. Former cavalry man, E.W. Kingsbury, defeated him, along with Chauncey Whitney. Hickok and Redlegs sidekick, Jack Harvey rode the district as Deputy U.S. Marshals.

Main Street of Ellsworth today.




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W
Walnut Street, Ellsworth Kansas. 508 miles west of St. Louis Mo. 1867







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TheTThe old Livery Stable on the Smoky Riverhe old Livery stable, it sits along the Smoky River. From here the trail splits from ttthtte RR staying south closer to the river meeting again at Fort Hays.


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North side of Main Street, Ellsworth Kansas. 508 miles west of St. Louis Mo. 1867, Alexander Gardner.








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Bull train crossing the Smoky Hill River at Ellsworth Kansas. On the old Santa Fe crossing 508 miles west of St. Louis Mo. 1867. Alexander Gardner. This is where you split off the Smoky to get over to the Santa Fe Trail picking it up close to the halfway point, Pawnee Rock.








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Moving up the line just a few miles we will come to a tragic spot on the Kansas Pacific line. By October 1867 the RR had made it to Hays, 6 track workers were working just to the east of Hays about 5 miles that october, when a Cheyenne war party came upon them.

1867, Alexander Gardner.


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This bottom picture is a family photo, of my great great grand dad taken on the southern Kansas, route along the Arkansas River Valley.


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Am I boring you to death yet. This thing seems to be going over like a cold Buffalo Turd.
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Old January 10th, 2011, 04:06 PM   #16

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Southern Cheyenne, Raid on the Union Pacific RR.


Going to jump this report forty miles west up the track to Victoria, Kansas. Victoria sits on the south side of I-70, the town was not here when this took place. It was august 1st 1867, seven track workers were about ten miles east of Fort Hays where the Eastern division now had the end of the track, they were unarmed, after this attack railworkers were armed.


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Just two miles south of Victoria, lies a small gravesite just on the south side of the Union Pacific, tracks. Along a little creek that feeds into the Smoky, buried here are six Union Pacific workers killed by the Southern Cheyenne.

I do believe this is the only marker that was ever put by the Union Pacific Eastern Division, for workers killed while doing their job, most got a shallow grave along the tracks, no marker.


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You can see the tracks just on the other side of Highway 40. Before I-70 you took 40 to get west across this part of kansas, the Kansas portion of I-70 was completed in 1966.


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There names are below. When I first mentioned this story I talked of seven Rail Road Men but only six are buried here, one man survived his wounds long enough to make it by foot the ten miles into Fort Hays, where he died and was then buried in the Fort Hays, Cemetery.


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One of the facinating things about this site is the Head Stone made by their friends, weathered but still readable after all this time. I would love to know the story behind this stone, but I am afraid that story is lost to time.


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When you traveled west of Harker you ran out of Dime Store Indians and started runing into the real thing, a lot of people found that out the hard way.

This little Cemetery has one more sad tale to tell, their are five other graves here. It would seem that this is one of those storys that wasn't finished yet. The Cemetery has eleven graves, I would say it was a tough row to hoe for all of them.


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One of the original Head Stones, for the family.


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You can see the trestel through the trees where the tracks cross Spring Hill Creek, it is a lonely little place!


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Will take this over to Pawnee Rock and Fort Larned on the SantaFe Trail next, they are off the Smoky about fifty miles straight south but pertain to the Smoky Hill Trail.

Gardner took this photo in 1867 just west of Salina, Kansas, maybe one or two of these guys had a bad day out by Fort Hays that late summer 1867.


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Old January 12th, 2011, 03:37 PM   #17

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Pawnee Rock...


Pawnee Rock, is about forty miles south of the Smoky Hill, it was the halfway point on the Santa Fe Trail. One of the many old tales of Pawnee Rock involves Kit Carson.

Colonel Henry Inman, 1897.

Pawnee Rock, received its name in a baptism of blood, but there are many versions as to the time and sponsors. It was there that Kit Carson killed his first Indian, and from that fight, as he told me
himself, the broken mass of red sandstone was given its distinctive title.

Pawnee Rock.


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It was late in the spring of 1826; Kit, was then a mere boy, only seventeen years old, and as green as any boy of his age who had never been forty miles from the place where he was born. Colonel Ceran St. Vrain, then a prominent agent of one of the great fur companies, was fitting out an expedition destined for the far-off Rocky Mountains, the members of which, all trappers, were to obtain the skins of the buffalo, beaver, otter, mink, and other valuable fur-bearing animals that then roamed in immense numbers on the vast plains or in the hills, and were also to trade with the various tribes of Indians on the borders of Mexico.


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Carson joined this expedition, which was composed of twenty-six mule wagons, some loose stock, and forty-two men. The boy was hired to help drive the extra animals, hunt game, stand guard, and to make himself generally useful, which, of course, included fighting Indiansif any were met with on the long route.


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The expedition left Fort Osage one bright morning in May in excellent spirits, and in a few hours turned abruptly to the west on the broad Trail to the mountains. The great plains in those early days were solitary and desolate beyond the power of description; the Arkansas River sluggishly followed the tortuous windings of its treeless banks with a placidness that was awful in its very silence; and whoso traced the wanderings of that stream with no companion but his own thoughts, realized in all its intensity the depth of solitude from which Robinson Crusoe suffered on his lonely island. Illimitable as the ocean, the weary waste stretched away until lost in the purple of the horizon, and the mirage created weird pictures in the landscape, distorted distances and objects which continually annoyed and deceived. Despite its loneliness, however, there was then, and ever has been for many men, an infatuation for those majestic prairies that once experienced is never lost, and it came to the boyish heart of Kit, who left them but with life, and full of years.


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So they marched for about three weeks, when they arrived at the crossing of the Walnut, where they saw the first signs of Indians. They had halted for that day; the mules were unharnessed, the camp-fires lighted, and the men just about to indulge in their refreshing coffee, when suddenly half a dozen Pawnee, mounted on their ponies, hideously painted and uttering the most demoniacal yells, rushed out of the tall grass on the river-bottom, where they had been ambushed, and swinging their buffalo-robes, attempted to stampede the herd picketed near the camp. The whole party were on their feet in an instant with rifles in hand, and all the savages got for their trouble were a few well-deserved shots as they hurriedly scampered back to the river and over into the sand hills on the other side, soon to be out of sight.


(The names of travelers of this Trail can still be found along the Rock face, the sad part is with some of these places you have to look past the graffiti from today scratched on this Santa Fe Trail site.)

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The expedition traveled sixteen miles next day, and camped at Pawnee Rock, where, after the experience of the evening before, every precaution was taken to prevent a surprise by the savages.The wagons were formed into a corral, so that the animals could be secured in the event of a prolonged fight; the guards were drilled by the colonel, and every man slept with his rifle for a bed-fellow, for the old trappers knew that the Indians would never remain satisfied with their defeat on the Walnut, but would seize the first favorable opportunity to renew their attack.


(Looking north east down the Santa Fe Trail, from the top of the bluff. My photos do not do the place justice, about thirty foot of the sandstone top was quarried by the early settlers.)

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The alarm proved to be false; there was no further disturbance that night, so the party returned to their beds, and the sentinels to their several posts, Kit of course to his place in front of the Rock.
Early the next morning, before breakfast even, all were so anxious to see Kit's dead Indian, that they went out en masse to where he was still stationed, and instead of finding a painted Pawnee, as was expected, they found the boy's riding mule dead, shot right through the head.

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Kit felt terribly mortified over his ridiculous blunder, and it was a long time before he heard the last of his midnight adventure and his raid on his own mule. But he always liked to tell the "balance of the story," as he termed it, and this is his version:

"I had not slept any the night before, for I stayed awake watching to get a shot at the Pawnees that tried to stampede our animals, expecting they would return; and I hadn't caught a wink all day, as I was out buffalo hunting, so I was awfully tired and sleepy when we arrived at Pawnee Rock that evening, and when I was posted at my place at night, I must have gone to sleep leaning against the rocks; at any rate, I was wide enough awake when the cry of Indians was given by one of the guard. I had picketed my mule about twenty steps from where I stood, and I presume he had been lying down; all I remember is that the first thing I saw after the alarm was something rising up out of the grass, which I thought was an Indian. I pulled the trigger; it was a centre shot, and I don't believe the mule ever kicked after he was hit!"




The only grave stone at Pawnee Rock. But I doubt the only grave in the area.




Pvt. John Taylor Hughes, also a member of the 1st Missouri, described Carson's burial in his 1847 book, Doniphan's Expedition.
Early on the morning of the 14th the Army was put in motion, Capt. Congreve Jackson and his company being left to pay the last honors to the remains of young N. Carson, who died suddenly the previous night. His burial took place near the Pawnee Rock, a decent grave being prepared to receive the corpse, wrapped in a blanket instead of a coffin and shroud. A tombstone was raised to mark the spot where he reposes, with his name, age, and the date of his decease engraved in large capitals. He slumbers in the wild Pawnee's land. This is but a sample of the interment of hundreds whose recent graves mark the march of the Western Army.


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(There are stairs to the top of the structure at the top you are standing where the top of the bluff once stood before being quarried off by the early settlers of the area.)


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Next stop Fort Larned, on Pawnee Fork.


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Old January 12th, 2011, 03:38 PM   #18
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Continuing great stuff.
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Old January 12th, 2011, 06:15 PM   #19

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Glad you are enjoying it Centrix. One thing I would like to point out in this virtual tour is that these places are not protected, most have been vandalized for years by people that did not realize that their name probably did not belong along side a guy that rolled by here in a freight wagon in the 1830's, seeing as how they drove up in a mini van!

To be fair it's hard to say how many names were lost when Pawnee Rock, was quarried, but all of these places are this way in Kansas, if they are cared for it is by small historical societys in small vanishing western Kansas, towns. How long will Mushroom Rock stay balanced? from the old pics you can see the bases are wearing down, Castle Rock lost a thirty foot piece in the 80's, and has lost some of the landmark formations to erosion. Shadows of that time are still out here to be found but some of them are geting dimmer. The history and events that made this state have pretty much been forgotten west of I-35.


After Larned, this report will move back to the Smoky Hill Trail and Fort Hays, onto the high plains of western Kansas.There is some really cool history and places out that way to show you.


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On the map above the Cheyenne and the Kansa or Kaw had at it a bit, the Osage and Kaw were pretty close to the same and hunted the plains. The Osage, had villages more in the south eastern part of Kansas. The Kaw lived by Council Grove, the Cheyenne and Kaw once fought a battle just outside of Coucil Grove, the town went out to watch. I have a ton of Council Grove, and Kaw reservation pictures, but will spare you for now.


As you can see in the map below as you move across the middle of the state the action gets a little hot and heavy, thats pretty much the Smoky Hill Trail, or BOD!

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Old January 13th, 2011, 05:27 PM   #20

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Fort Larned. Guardian of the Santa Fe Trail.


The old fort still makes the papers every now and then, I think this was in the Wichita Eagle two years ago.


Long-buried Ft. Larned soldiers to be identified


BY JOHN MILBURN

Associated Press

FORT LEAVENWORTH After 121 years of resting in peace, 62 frontier soldiers who died on the Kansas plains are about to get their identity back.
The soldiers were once stationed at Fort Larned, one of many frontier outposts established by the War Department in the 1800s to protect settlers and traders from Indian attacks along trails west. Fort Larned was occupied from 1859 to 1878, its soldiers known as "Guardians of the Santa Fe" as they protected settlers traveling the trail heading southwest.


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When the post was abandoned and later sold in 1888, the remains were exhumed and taken 300 miles northeast to Fort Leavenworth for reburial. Fort Larned National Historic Site historian George Elmore said the Army knew the name of each soldier, but the identities weren't placed on headstones when the remains were re-interred.
"It was just a different period of time," Elmore said. "The Army didn't do anything to identify the soldiers coming in. There were no photographs or fingerprints."


(The fort sits in an Oxbow of the Pawnee Fork, the fort cemetery sat on the opposite side)

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With no markings, the soldiers were given white headstones reading "Unknown US Soldier" in Section B of the cemetery.
On Saturday, those soldiers who died over a 19-year span at Fort Larned in southwest Kansas will be identified. A new bronze monument will be dedicated in Section B with the names of 62 soldiers, giving them recognition for their service. The identities of three soldiers remain unknown.


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"It finally gives the Fort Larned dead the name recognition," Elmore said. "In a sense, it gives identity to the individuals who gave their lives out here at Fort Larned."
Most of the men died of diseases that today wouldn't be fatal but were on the
remote Kansas prairie. Elmore said about 15 percent of those who died were killed in fighting with Indian tribes. Most of the men were single, choosing a life in the Army and adventure in the West over a wife and family.


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Sam Young, a historian at Fort Leavenworth who will play taps at the dedication, said one soldier was killed by a wolf.
Like it did from Forts Hays, Harker and Wallace, Young said the Army moved soldiers' remains east because the graves could no longer be maintained. Fort Larned became ranch and farmland for 80 years, owned by one family for 64 of those years before it was re-established as a national historic site.


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Fort Larned averaged four companies of cavalry, or 300 to 350 men at any given time, during its operation. Elmore said the largest encampment there was in 1867 when Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock led an expedition against hostile tribes.
Other famous Americans to serve at the post were George Armstrong Custer and William "Buffalo Bill" Cody, who was a clerk, scout and guide in 1867.


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Elmore said the post was no longer needed after railroads reached southwest Kansas and life on the prairie became more feasible.
"The whole West just changed during that period of Fort Larned, almost overnight," Elmore said.
Efforts to recognize the Fort Larned soldiers buried at Fort Leavenworth began in 2001 with volunteers at the historic site who felt the soldiers should be properly honored.
Young said it would be cost-prohibitive to try identifying individual soldiers and give each his own headstone. However, small U.S. flags will be placed at the Fort Larned graves during Saturday's ceremony to identify them.


(The old original 1867 Cenotaph, was found in the town of Larned's cemetery, about 5 miles to the east, and returned it to stand in the Oxbow, there are still civillian graves here, but the exact locations are lost to time)


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