Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > American History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

American History American History Forum - United States, Canada, Mexico, Central and South America


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 13th, 2011, 06:21 PM   #21

Sod Buster's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jan 2011
From: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 142

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOtvMuMCpyE]YouTube - Fort Larned, KS Memorial Day 2009 Flag Raising[/ame]
Sod Buster is offline  
Remove Ads
Old January 15th, 2011, 04:08 PM   #22

Sod Buster's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jan 2011
From: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 142

Custer, and the seventh.

In the spring of 1867 the United States army marched 1400 men into west central Kansas as a show of force to the southern plains tribes. The unit under command of Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock consisted of infantry, artillery, and four companys of the recently organized 7th Cavalry under the field command of Lt. Col. George A. Custer. Departing Fort Riley on march 26 the column reached Fort Harker on april 1 where two additional companies of calvary and one of infantry joined the expedition. On April 5, the column arrived at Fort Zarah and proceeded southwest to Fort Larned.


There in nothing left of Fort Zarah, it sat just north east of Pawnee Rock on the Great Bend of the Arkansas.

( Looking north, the building on the left was the barracks, the one on the right mess hall, hospital)

Click the image to open in full size.


This expedition would march on a Cheyenne, and Sioux Village just up Pawnee Fork in Ness county Kansas, Fort Larned, also sits on Pawnee Fork, This expedition was supposed to be about talking peace, but with the aproach of the military the Village of 1500 Cheyenne and Sioux fled their Village during the night with their pony herd and what they could carry , Hancock, had an inventory of their property taken and an estimate given of $100,000, he then burned the empty Village to the ground. Custer would give chase to the Cheyenne and Sioux but come up empty handed. The Sioux and Cheyenne proceeded north the the BOD and began burning stage stations.


(Looking east, hospital, mess hall on the left, Farier, forge, bakery on the right, on the far side of the building is the ox bow and cemetery)


Click the image to open in full size.



The buildings AT old Fort Larned, were started in 1866 and finished by 1868, there has been a fort in the way of dugouts since 1859, unlike Fort Zarah which is completly gone and Fort Harker, that has only a few buidings left, Fort Larned is the most complete fort of the Indian Wars in Kansas, it sit's about seven miles west of the city of Larned on the oxbow of Pawnee Fork, after being decommisioned the old Fort was a ranch from 1885 untill 1966 when it became a national landmark, it was first called Camp Alert and was two miles East on Pawnee creek it had no buildings at that time, if you ever get a chance to stop it costs nothing to have a look, but you might throw a few bucks in the donation box, the money goes to help maintain the fort.


Four men to a bunk head to toe.

Click the image to open in full size.


Tick Matress, grass filled.


Click the image to open in full size.



Click the image to open in full size.



Click the image to open in full size.


The kitchen. The fort had a seperate bakery as they all did.


Click the image to open in full size.



Click the image to open in full size.



Mess hall.



Click the image to open in full size.


Hospital.


Click the image to open in full size.


Some times there will be reenactors at the fort some times not.


Click the image to open in full size.



The black smith shop has two forges built in 1866 the bellows are original they have been rehided, but the frame work is the original.


Click the image to open in full size.



Click the image to open in full size.

Last edited by Sod Buster; January 15th, 2011 at 04:20 PM.
Sod Buster is offline  
Old January 17th, 2011, 02:59 PM   #23

Sod Buster's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jan 2011
From: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 142

Larned was where some of the tribes came for there government rations, it is also where a few white prisoners were returned back to the U.S, government for payment, some times Fort Dodge, was used for this also..


The article that I started the Fort Larned, part of this report with, talked of one of the soldiers at Larned, being killed by a wolf, below is the Fort Larned, Wolf story.


When Fort Larned, was in operation, the surrounding countryside was filled with animals no longer found here on the plains: bison, pronghorns, elk, bear, and wolves. The wildness allowed for some interactions that might seem very unusual to us now that these animals have been pushed elsewhere.


The Officers Quarters, west end.


Click the image to open in full size.


August 5, 1868, a rabid wolf went on a rampage through Fort Larned. A few days later, Captain Albert Barnitz of the 7th US Cavalry recorded this memory of the incident:


Click the image to open in full size.


"Quite a serious affair occurred at the Post on the night of the 5th. Colonel [Wynkoop], the Indian Agent, was sitting on his porch, with his wife and children, and Mrs. Nolan and Tappan, I believe, and Lt. Thompson of the 3rd Infantry - and others, when a mad wolf - a very large grey wolf - entered the Post and bit one of the sentinels


Click the image to open in full size.


ran into the hospital and bit a man lying in bed - passed another tent, and pulled another man out of bed, biting him severely - bit one man's finger nearly off - bit at one woman, I believe and some other persons in bed, but did not bite through the bed clothes.


Click the image to open in full size.


passed through the hall of Captain Nolan's house, and pounced on a large dog which he found there, and whipped him badly in half a minute - and then passed the porch of Col. [Wynkoop] - and springing in upon Lt. Thompson bit him quite severely in several places - he then passed on to where there was a sentinel guarding the haystacks and tried to bite the sentinel, but did not succeed - the sentinel firing and shooting him there on the spot!"


Click the image to open in full size.


Corporal Michael McGillicuddy of the 3rd Infantry, Company C was in bed in the hospital when he was bitten on the hand. McGillicuddy refused to have his wounded finger amputated. He later died of rabies.


Click the image to open in full size.


This was not the only time wolves attacked the fort. Private Ado Hunnius recorded in his journal on July 13, 1867, "During night some wolves tried to work under the door to get into the cook house, a dugout in old bed of Pawnee Fork Creek. One got in but was shot by cook. It was a big one."


Decrative sand stone on the Officers Quarters, all of the stone was quarried near the fort, some one spent some time!

Click the image to open in full size.


They have one of the best Harpers Weekly displays from this time period, I think Kansas, kept Harpers in business for a while.


During a 2005 renovation of the north wall of the Old Commissary, the National Park Service work crew discovered a 100-pound stone with "J H Mc LAUGHLIN CO B 3 RGT" etched on its top side. This stone, which had been hidden since the building was completed in 1866, revealed an interesting individual. It turns out that the graffiti artist was John H. McLaughlin, a private in the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, Company B. That his name appears on the stone suggests that he was involved in building the structure, suggesting soldiers participated in its construction. McLaughlin placed the stone at the top, face up, so that the roof would cover the carvings, suggesting that although he wanted to leave his mark, he did not want to get caught; he must have known the hazards of defacing government property. His stone is one of the rare examples of soldiers leaving graffiti behind.





Click the image to open in full size.


John Henry McLaughlin was born June 22, 1826 in Limerick, Ireland. At age 20 he boarded a famous sea craft named the "Jane Black," bound for America. After 37 days at sea, a violent storm sent the "Jane Black" to the bottom of the Atlantic. A chance passing ship saved the crew and passengers from their fate and returned them to Ireland. McLaughlin changed plans and went to Calcutta, India. There, he was offered a position as Chief of the Native Police, which he declined. While in Calcutta, he narrowly survived cholera. Only with the dedication of a female doctor did he survive.


Click the image to open in full size.


In India, McLaughlin learned the trade of manufacturing paper. He took his newfound skill and headed for America via the West Indies. He arrived in Baltimore, then traveled to Buffalo, New York to apply his new trade. The Civil War pulled McLaughlin into military service. He joined the United States Navy and was assigned to the "USS Virginia." For unknown reasons, he was transferred to the "USS Ida." The "Ida" was assisting other ships taking of seaports in Alabama, and was known for her capture of the Confederate ship "Southern Republic." One day, as the "Ida" was sailing from Fort Blakely, she struck a sea mine. In McLaughlin's words, the ship "blew into a thousand pieces." Most of the crew were killed in the blast. McLaughlin was blown overboard and managed to hold on to a floating timber until rescued by the "USS Tallahatche." The "Tallahatche" picked up only one other survivor.


Click the image to open in full size.


After his discharge, McLaughlin had trouble finding work, so he enlisted in the Army. McLaughlin was assigned to Company B, 3rd Infantry Regiment, and posted to Fort Larned, Kansas in 1866, just as construction was ramping up on the fort's sandstone buildings. It was there and then that McLaughlin carved his name and unit on the stone atop the Commissary wall. John McLaughlin's career in the army spanned 12 years. In 1870, he transferred to the 6th Cavalry, and re-enlisted with the 8th Cavalry in 1874.


Click the image to open in full size.


McLaughlin recalled his most terrifying experience fighting Indians while carrying dispatches with five others to another post. "We were attacked by about 130 Indians, we made breastwork out of our horses and when forced back we took cover behind two of our fallen comrades who had just been killed. When all hope was lost, we were saved by the arrival of another troop of Cavalry."


Click the image to open in full size.


McLaughlin retired from the army in 1877 and lived an active life to the end, attending reunions and lodge meetings. Others remembered he was the center of attention. John H. McLaughlin died on October 6, 1907 at 4:30 pm at Fort Randall, where he had spent most of his twilight years.



Click the image to open in full size.


1867 and 1868 were Fort Larned's most consequential years. In the spring of 1867, General Hancock blundered into war with the Cheyenne, a season of fighting known as Hancock's War. That conflict ended with the pivotal Medicine Lodge Treaty in October, 1867, which Fort Larned supplied. The following year, the gifts promised by the treaty were distributed at Fort Larned.


Click the image to open in full size.


That'l do it for Larned, will jump back over to the Smoky, BOD, in the next post.
Sod Buster is offline  
Old January 17th, 2011, 05:09 PM   #24

Sod Buster's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jan 2011
From: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 142

One last thing on Larned, it was used as a film location in the recent film The Only Good Indian, with Wes Sudi, they also filmed along the Smoky as Monument Rocks is in a scene. Not a bad movie, kind of shows a different perspective. And if your a fan of the prairie the scenery in it is grand!

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7OVCFNNUfk"]YouTube - The Only Good Indian Movie Trailer[/ame]
Sod Buster is offline  
Old January 21st, 2011, 03:36 PM   #25

Sod Buster's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jan 2011
From: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 142
Fort Hays, Kansas.


Fort Hays, is a little like Harker, there are only four buildings left standing. Two of the officers quarters were moved into town after the fort was decommisioned, they would eventually be moved back to fort Hays. Larned is pretty much whole, Harker and Hays have pieces left, Zarah is completly gone, Wallace as I will show later is gone but for the cemetery and what a cemetery it is! A bunch of prairie between Hays and Wallace to see.


(Officers Quarters. These are the two surviving structures that were moved from town back to the fort, the fort is on the south west edge of town near the university.)


Click the image to open in full size.


Fort Hays was an important U.S. Army post that was active from 1865 until 1889. Originally designated Fort Fletcher (after Governor Thomas C. Fletcher of Missouri), it was located five miles south of present-day Walker, Kansas, and became operational on October 11, 1865. Troops stationed at Fort Fletcher were to protect the stage and freight wagons of the Butterfield Overland Despatch (BOD) traveling along the Smoky Hill Trail to Denver. Despite the presence of the soldiers, Southern Cheyenne and Southern Arapaho Indians continued to confront traffic along the trail.


(Officers Quarters.)


Click the image to open in full size.


On October 11, 1866, Fort Fletcher was reopened approximately one-fourth mile north of its previous location, at the confluence of Big Creek and the North Fork of Big Creek. The Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division, was being constructed westward roughly paralleling the Smoky Hill Trail and the construction workers needed the protection of the U.S. Army. In December 1866 Fort Fletcher was renamed Fort Hays in honor of Brigadier General Alexander Hays, who was killed during the Civil War, Battle of the Wilderness. As the railroad approached Fort Hays, it became apparent that it would pass approximately five miles to the north of the post.

(The back side of the officers quarters, they stand in the same spot that they were moved from, I belive there were ten of these at one time and would have ran to the left of the pic side by side, with the Parade Ground directly in front of them.)

Click the image to open in full size.


The army wanted the fort to be used as a supply depot for other forts in the area and therefore needed it to be located close to the railroad line. In the spring of 1867 a flood nearly wiped out Fort Hays killing nine soldiers and civilians. Two weeks later, on June 23, the new Fort Hays near the railroad right-of-way was occupied. With the arrival of the railway a few months later, the goal of a large supply depot to service forts to the south and west was realized. ( I think this flood would have been the one Libby Custer endured while camped outside Fort Hays with her husband)


Click the image to open in full size.


In addition to its supply role, Fort Hays was a base for troops defending the railroad and white settlements in the area. Nearly six hundred troops were stationed here in the early years. Some of the famous figures associated with the fort included Wild Bill Hickok, Buffalo Bill Cody, General Nelson Miles, General Philip Sheridan, and Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer. It was also the home of several well-known Indian wars regiments such as the Seventh U.S. Cavalry, the Fifth U.S. Infantry, and the Tenth U.S. Cavalry, whose black troopers were better known as buffalo soldiers. After twenty-five years of service, Fort Hays was abandoned on November 8, 1889.

Wild Bill.
In late 1869 Hickok became sheriff of Hays City, Kans., where drinking, gambling, and prostitution often led to violence. In 4 months as sheriff there Hickok helped establish law and order, although in doing so he killed two men.


Click the image to open in full size.


Today four original buildings survive: the blockhouse (completed as the post headquarters in 1868), guardhouse, and two officers' quarters. The museum was opened in 1967 and is administered by the Kansas Historical Society.

The Guard House.

Click the image to open in full size.


In the fore ground of this pic you can see a foundation, the foundations are evident through out the grounds so you can tell where the buildings stood. And yes that is a golf course directly behind the old Fort.


Click the image to open in full size.


In 1868 General Philip Sheridan, reported seeing a herd of 300,000 buffalo near Fort Hays. He estimated the herd covered a territory 90 miles in length and 25 miles wide.


Click the image to open in full size.


Following Howard Raynesford's death on March 2, 1967 many of his papers were donated to the Hays Public Library. They now reside in the Kansas Room there.

The Block House.

Click the image to open in full size.


Hays Kansas, Denver stage with Buffalo Soldier guard. 1867, Alexander Gardner.


Click the image to open in full size.

One of Howards BOD markers.


Click the image to open in full size.



Fort Hays, 1867 580 miles west of St Louis. Alexander Gardner.




Click the image to open in full size.


Hays City, Kansas, 1867, Alexander Gardner.

Click the image to open in full size.


Map of where this report has been so far, I will take it straight west up the trail next, no more forts for about a hundred miles.



Click the image to open in full size.

One last pic, not much to see at Ft Zarah. But I do love a historical marker, can't seem to ever be able to pass one with out stoping.


Click the image to open in full size.

Last edited by Sod Buster; January 21st, 2011 at 04:22 PM.
Sod Buster is offline  
Old January 25th, 2011, 02:33 PM   #26

Sod Buster's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jan 2011
From: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 142

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8OSJ2HdE7U&feature=player_embedded]YouTube - A Drive Through History Along the Post Rock Scenic Byway[/ame]

An interesting video on the origins of and how the old timer's quarried Post Rock.

North Central Kansas, is known as Post Rock country, Begining about 1880 the settlers started fencing it, Post Rock country stretches about two hundred miles from the Nebraska border near Mahaska almost directly southwest to just north of Dodge City, it covers roughly five thousand square miles of Kansas a little more than three million acres, much of it in the Smoky Hills.


Click the image to open in full size.

These posts are what Howard used to mark the B.O.D these fence lines are a 100 to 150 years old.


Click the image to open in full size.

The posts sold for as low as five cents to 50 cents a post, the hay day of rock posts ran from about 1880 to 1920, in the pic above you can see the drill marks down the side of the post.

Click the image to open in full size.


In 1950 they estimated that there were thirty to forty thousand mile of rock post fence line in this part of Kansas, thats a lot of rock, some of it has been tore out as roads were widened, but most of it is still out here on the prairie.


Click the image to open in full size.


The lime stone was easy to work when first quarried it then hardens with exposure to sun and air, in the pic below the hillside in the distance is covered in post rock.


Click the image to open in full size.


The old posts fit well into the landscape, and many of the old homes and barns were made from it, any posts that were to short for fence went into buildings. There are some beautiful examples of immigrant stone work across the state in it's buildings and bridges.


Click the image to open in full size.
Sod Buster is offline  
Old January 28th, 2011, 04:08 PM   #27

Sod Buster's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jan 2011
From: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 142
The BOD, Butterfield Overland Despatch.


[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCmeUr7s_ac&feature=player_embedded]YouTube - Stagecoach[/ame]

Though the Government was using it some, as were probably many emigrant parties and gold-seekers, the life of the Smoky Hill route really began when David A. Butterfield took hold of it in 1865. Though living at Atchison, he had an extensive acquaintance in Denver from several years residence there, and the people of Denver had unbounded faith in him. He was a smooth talker was very ambitious and had few equals as an organizer, and evidently believed in advertising, for he spent large sums of money advertising his enterprise through the leading papers in New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Atchison, Denver and Salt Lake, and it became one of the leading topics of the day all over the country.


Click the image to open in full size.


Alexander Gardner, 1867, 6 miles west of Hays, 886 miles west of St Louis.
(The prairie apears to have burnt in this photo)

Click the image to open in full size.


Meanwhile the actual road was being prepared. The surveying party, consisting of Lt. Julian R. Fitch and four men of the U S Signal Corps, Col. Isaac Eaton and his party of twenty-six constructionists with eleven four-mule teams and wagons, and an escort of two hundred and fifty cavalry under Maj. Pritchard, left Ellsworth July 14 on the actual work of surveying and constructing the road and stations.


Click the image to open in full size.


Click the image to open in full size.



Some extracts from Lt. Fitch's report concerning this particular part of the trail will be interesting, - "Our road from this point laid over a hard stretch of level bench land covered with a luxuriant growth of buffalo grass. Finding fine springs as we traveled along, erecting mounds for every station, forty-six miles from Ft. Ellsworth we came to Big Creek at its mouth, a large stream having a beautiful valley with heavy timber. Here we made a good rock ford and erected a mound for a station. On the morning of the 18th we left camp, bearing a little south of west, close to the Smoky, and at a distance of twenty-eight miles we came to a fine large spring, one of the finest in the west. (This was the spring at Fremont's Pawnee Indian Village located on the N E quarter of 21-15-19, which village site H. C. Raynesford surveyed and mapped in 1953).


Click the image to open in full size.


Fifteen miles further (at the John Allman ranch) we bore away from the river and kept on high level ground about three miles north of the river which here makes a southerly bend. On the south side of the river, opposite this point, we discovered high bluffs covered with cedar. (Cedar Bluffs).

(The Smokey is now damed at Cedar Bluffs, below is a photo from the top of the bluffs looking out over the trail, which is covered by the reservoir now, looking west)

Click the image to open in full size.


Click the image to open in full size.


(Looking east, the thing you must remember is that out here on these Great Plains places like this that had some elevation were a magnet for people, if you traveled the Smoky you were going to come up here for a look, you can see forever)

Click the image to open in full size.


Twelve and a half miles west we camped at the head springs of a stream emptying south three miles into Smoky Hill. The water and grass at the place we found unusually fine. We called this place Downer Station. Nine and one-fourth miles furtherwest we crossed Castle Rock Creek (Hackberry). Camped two days to rest. The scenery here is really grand. One mile south is a lofty calcareous limestone bluff, having the appearance of an old English castle with pillars and avenues traversing it in every direction. We named it Castle Rock....The advantages of the Smoky Hill route over the Platte or the Arkansas must be apparent to everybody. In the first place it is 116 miles shorter to Denver, and emigration, like a ray of light, will not go around unless there are unsurmountable obstacles in the way. In this case the obstructions are altogether on the Platte and Arkansas routes. Aside from the difference in the distance in favor of the new route, you will find no sand on it, whilst from Julesburg to Denver, a distance of 200 miles, the emigrant or freighter has a dead pull of sand, without a stick of timber, or a drop of living water, sane the Platte itself, which is from three to five miles from the road; and when it is taken into consideration that a loaded ox-train makes but from twelve to fourteen miles a day, it will not pay and will double the distance to drive to the Platte for the purpose of camping, and all will admit that the Platte waters are so strongly impregnated with alkali as to render it dangerous to water stock in it, whilst on the new route not a particle of this bane can be found." "Another advantage of the new route is hardly a spear of grass can be found to hide the sandy desert-like appearance of the route: whilst on the new route an abundance of excellent buffalo grass and gramma grass can be found all the way."


Click the image to open in full size.



The enterprise started off with a rush. Business was big from the start. The first train sent out -- a small one -- was on June 4th, 1865 and was known as "Train A", loaded with 150 thousand pounds of freight for Denver. On July 15th another train carried seventeen large steam boilers and another carried 600,000 lbs. of miscellaneous supplies. Steamboats discharged great quantities of freight on the Atchison levee for shipment on the "Despatch line",


Click the image to open in full size.


Butterfield himself went through on the first coach, which reached Denver Sept. 23d, 1865. The people of Denver had the greatest confidence in him and his enterprise and gave him an enthusiastic welcome. They met him a few miles out of Denver with a delegation of prominent citizens -- his old friends and neighbors -- transferred him to a carriage and drove him direct to the Planter's House, where they received him royally with enthusiastic speeches and a great banquet.


Click the image to open in full size.


All of these photos are the landskape of the Smoky Hill Trail, they are taken just off to the side or directly off of the trail, this is what you would have seen minus the crops out the window of your coach.


Click the image to open in full size.


Kansas Mud Wagon, I took this pic at the Kansas Historical Museum in Topeka this is what a lot of the coaches looked like, they were rag tops.


Click the image to open in full size.


What they would have used to grade the trail.


Click the image to open in full size.
Sod Buster is offline  
Old January 28th, 2011, 04:30 PM   #28

Sod Buster's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jan 2011
From: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 142

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6vREiRNMFc&feature=player_embedded"]YouTube - The Big Country - composer Jerome Moross[/ame]


The Stations... miles...


Junction City, Kansas........

Chapman's Creek... 12

Abilene................ 12

Solomon River....... 10

Salina................. 13

Spring Creek........ 15
below. Alexander Gardner 1867.
Click the image to open in full size.

Ellsworth............. 14
Near Ft Harker.

Buffalo Creek........ 12

Hicks Station........ 15

Fossil Creek.......... 15

Forsythe's Creek... 11

Big Creek............. 11
Near where the railworkers died.

Louisa Springs...... 12 Near Hays.

Bluffton.............. 14
Threshing Machine canyon. Massacre site.

Downer.............. 13
Where in the story above Howard takes the old man to the trail that was youngest trooper in Custer's 7th. Cavalry.

CastleRock Creek. 9
A little east of Castle Rock

Grannell Springs... 11
Just west of Castle Rock.

Chalk Bluffs......... 12

Monument.......... 13
Monument Rocks

SmokyHill Spring.. 11
Where the stage and ambulance are atacked coming into the station.

Eaton............... 12

Henshaw Creek.. 13
Near the German Family massacre.

Pond Creek....... 11
The last surviving Station. Below.

Click the image to open in full size.

Willow Creek..... 14

Blue Mound....... 9
last station in Kansas.

Cheyenne Wells. 13
First station in Colorado.

Dubois............. 24

Gradys............. 11

Cornell Creek..... 13

Coon Creek....... 12

Hogan.............. 12

Hedingers Lake... 9

Big Bend of Sandy. 13

Reeds Spring.... 13

Bijou Creek...... 12

Kiowa Creek.... 9

Ruthton.......... 9

Cherry Valley... 16

Denver........... 14

Total from Junction City, Kansas, 592 miles.

Last edited by Sod Buster; January 28th, 2011 at 05:12 PM.
Sod Buster is offline  
Old January 28th, 2011, 07:07 PM   #29

Sod Buster's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jan 2011
From: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 142

Monument Station was along the tree line to the left, West, of Monument Rock at the end of the road. We will get back to this area later we are not near this far west yet.


Click the image to open in full size.


The trail cut right beside the old Chalk Pyramid's. Another BOD Marker placed by Howard Raynesford. Looking straight north.

Click the image to open in full size.


Click the image to open in full size.
Sod Buster is offline  
Old January 29th, 2011, 01:11 PM   #30

Sod Buster's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jan 2011
From: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 142

Below are links to Gardners 1867, Kansas photos the first link is to his photos starting in St Louis and around Leavenworth, Kansas, The second link is to the area around Lawrence, Kansas, Abilene, Junction City, and Salina, as he moved up the BOD, the third link photos are from Abilene to just west of Hays. The Lawrence, Kansas, photos are facinating for the fact you must remember it had been burned by Quantrill's Raiders in August of 1863, just four years before Gardner took his photos of Lawrence.

#1
The Photographs of Alexander Gardner 1 | Photo Galleries | Wichita Eagle

#2
Images of Alexander Gardner 1867 | Kansas 150 photos | Wichita Eagle

#3
The Photographs of Alexander Gardner 3 | Photo Galleries | Wichita Eagle


Men like Gardner and Raynesford who documented this history are my heros, enjoy.

Alexander Gardner 1867. Hauling a camera around back then had to of been a total pain, a photo of Gardner on the back of his photographic rig that he used on the Smoky.


Click the image to open in full size.
Sod Buster is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > American History

Tags
united states, wild west



Search tags for this page
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trail Markers/New World davu Ancient History 0 September 17th, 2010 07:10 AM
William Howard Taft Saturn American History 2 September 12th, 2010 08:27 AM
On Hannibal's Trail BBCFour Danjwood History in Films and on Television 19 September 10th, 2010 04:23 AM
Beneath Hill 60 Son of Cathal History in Films and on Television 4 March 31st, 2010 01:57 PM
The Trail of Tears, October 1st 1838 MrStoff1989 American History 2 February 18th, 2007 05:26 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.