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Old March 5th, 2011, 01:50 PM   #61

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[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdCp7qLVGpg]YouTube - Sand Creek Massacre Part 1[/ame]


[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TID-arVaJME]YouTube - Sand Creek Massacre Part 2[/ame]


Just to the west of Monument Rocks the trail crosses highway 83 this paved road runs south straight out of Oakly on I-70 and crosses the Smoky River trail just a few miles west of the Monuments. We are going to jump off the trail and take a look at a couple of sites just a little to the south just off of 83, if you ever visit Monument Rock these two places are close and well worth a stop.


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The Smoky Hill River, looking west from 83, just about all of these pictures were taken in late august over a few years, the river is actually running pretty good for this time of year. Much higher and wetter than the summer the German family rolled down this trail.


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B.O.D. marker on 83 where the trail crosses it, looking back east towards the Monuments. Monument Rocks are about six miles east of 83.


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Looking south east from 83.


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Looking north west from the 83 marker.


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If you cross the Smoky to the south you will find the Keystone Fossil Gallery, it is housed in an the old Keystone church built in 1916.


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They used to host fossil hunting trips in their old suburban, many fossils from the area are on display here.


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The old fossil huntin suburban.


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Ladder creek runs from the west and then cuts north for about 25 miles paralleling 83 just to the west where it emptys into the south side of the Smoky Hill River. About 12 miles south of the river trail along Ladder Creek lies the canyons of El Quartelejo. This is also a major battle site of the plains Indian wars, in Kansas, it is known as the Last Indian raid of Kansas. It is the story of Little Wolf and Dull Knife and the Northern Cheyenne's excape from the Oklahoma reservation system. The route of the Northern Cheyenne pretty much follows 83 across the state.


Canyons of El Quartelejo.

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Old March 7th, 2011, 04:47 PM   #62

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El Quartelejo.


[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yASrfwkunm8]YouTube - Kansas: Cheyenne Anthem[/ame]


El Quartelejo, is only about 12 miles south of the B.O.D. off of highway 83, you will turn back west off of 83 for about three miles. To look at the landscape around you as you head in you would not know there were any canyons in the area, the canyons of Ladder Creek were an oasis on the prairie.

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El Quartelejo was constructed along Ladder Creek in what is now Scott County, Kansas. This site dates from 1650 to 1750 A.D. and is the northeasternmost pueblo ruin in the United States.
El Quartelejo, is located on state property at Scott lake, as Ladder Creek was damed for recreational purposes.


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From the bottom of the canyon near the Pueblo ruins, looking east towards the road in to the park.


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The Indians who first lived here were Taos, and Picuris, who created a village here along with the plains Apache in about 1664 the village was known as El Cuartelejo, the Apache were known as the Quartelejo band. Another group of Pueblo Picuris moved here in 1669 trying to excape spanish rule, by 1706 the Pueblo Indians were returned to New Mexico by Juan de Ulibarri, this is the furthest east that Pueblo ruins have been found in America.


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Canyons and bluffs surround the ruins from all directions and shield the area from adverse weather. The hills were look-out areas for intruders upon the village and the native rocks were collected for building material in the pueblo’s construction. It is not known whether all the structure was made of native rock or just the foundation with adobe used for the upper walls.


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A Spanish expedition of one hundred men under Pedro de Villazur camped at El Quartelejo in 1720 on it's way north to detrmine the location and strength of the french to the north and east, about 150 miles north of here they were atacked and killed by the Pawnee. French traders are said to have used the pueblo in 1727, shortly after this Ute, Comanche, and Pawnee attacks forced the Quartelejo Apache out of the area and El Quartelejo was abandoned for good




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The rocks are from the Ogallala formation, Pliocene Epoch, and date back 5 million years. This was the age when rhinoceros, camels, and horses roamed the Kansas plains.
Ladder Creek, which is adjacent to El Cuartelejo, is a spring-fed creek and runs year round. Infrequently—during torrential rains—temporary waterfalls cascade down the hillsides.


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The Indians at this site built irrigation ditches to water their crops in this lush valley environment. Between forty to fifty springs could be found in the valley; many were situated close to Ladder Creek where bottomland was plentiful for raising corn and other crops.
At one time, this whole valley region was an Indian campground. Artifacts found at El Cuartelejo were typical of the Plains Apache Indians. The Plains Apaches roamed further from the pueblo, but also used it as a marketplace for trading buffalo hides for other foods and goods.
Part of the present-day park was a major Apache village. Although there may have been other types of people coming through or camping, archeological evidence points to the Apaches and pueblo dwellers living in this area.


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Herb and Eliza Steele homesteaded this land and built a rock house just south of El Cuartelejo. Mr. Steele is credited with discovering these ruins around 1888. According to local newspaper accounts, Mr. Steele observed ground squirrels bringing up parched corn through their holes to the surface. At this point the Kansas Historical Society was contacted about Herb Steele’s findings.
This began one of the earliest archeological digs in the state of Kansas.


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In 1897 and1898, Handel T. Martin and Professor S.W. Williston, paleontologists from the University of Kansas, led an archeological dig that verified the ruins as El Cuartelejo. In 1899, Prof. Williston presented and published his scientific findings to the Kansas Historical Society.Martin’s study and investigation was published in 1909. The 1912 Kansas Cyclopedia included the following passage: “After remarking that much of the stone has been taken away by the people living in the vicinity, [Mr. Martin] asks the rather pertinent question: ‘Would it not be well for the state to preserve at this late day our only known pueblo from further destruction?’”


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During excavation the lower 2½’ of the stone walls were exposed. The outside walls measured between eighteen and twenty inches thick and surrounded seven different rooms. These rooms ranged in size from 10’ by 14’ to 16’ by 18’. The total pueblo area measures 32’ by 50’. No windows or door evidence was found leading experts to classify the dwelling as a pueblo type ruin.
Charred ends of ladder posts were also uncovered leading to the theory that the pueblo was burned during its later years. Numerous artifacts were uncovered and now reside at the Kansas State Historical Museum and the University of Kansas.


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In 1970, Tom Witty of the Kansas State Historical Society re-examined the El Cuartelejo site. Twenty sites were found in conjunction with the pueblo, although only one pueblo building is known to exist. The other sites were either camp areas or storage buildings.
During the excavation the whole pueblo floor, hearths, and locations of posts were unearthed. The outline of the pueblo walls was found to be different then the 1898 dig, and the south porch posts were discovered for the first time. Also found was evidence of an Apache roasting pit under the ruins, pre-dating the pueblo. The walls were then stabilized and informational placards were added.


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The D.A.R. (Daughters of the American Revolution) Kansas Chapter holds the land deed to El Cuartelejo. In 1925, the D.A.R. erected a granite marker on this site. It was discovered later that the marker was actually on top of part of the pueblo ruins and the marker was subsequently moved further away.


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1664: Taos Indians fleeing from Spanish persecution started moving northward looking for a new home. They settled in the area among the Plains Apaches. This village was called El Cuartelejo and the Apache inhabitants the Cuartelejo band. The Taos Indians remained for only a few years. Before the pre-1680 pueblo revolt in New Mexico, a Spanish expedition led by Juan de Archuleta returned the pueblo Indians back to New Mexico.

1696: Picuris Pueblo Indians resettled El Cuartelejo and joined with their Apache trading partners.

1706: Picuris returned to New Mexico by Spanish General Juan de Ulibarri.

1720: Pedro de Villasur led a Spanish expedition of one hundred men. They camped at El Cuartelejo en-route to scouting for French forces somewhere north and west of this location. They wanted to observe the French soldiers’ strength in numbers and location.
About 150 miles north of the site the Spanish troops died under an attack by bands of Pawnee Indians which supposedly were under French control. El Cuartelejo was considered a potential military outpost for the Spanish after these battles, but the plans were dropped.

1727: French traders were reported by the Indians at this site.

1730s: Frequent Comanche, Ute and Pawnee attacks on the Cuartelejo Apaches forced the abandonment of El Cuartelejo.


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We will head north up the canyon around the lake and back west to the canyons where the Northern Cheyenne, Dull Knife, Little Wolf battle site lies in the next post.


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Old March 9th, 2011, 04:45 PM   #63

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Dull Knife, Little Wolf & the Northern Cheyenne.


I could get totally lost in trying to tell this story and show the pics of where it happened as the Cheyenne moved north across the state, it is a report in itself to show and tell it right, so I will try to keep this moving with the part that happened along Ladder Creek in the canyons near the B.O.D. The video below is really worth a look great on scene shots with the story told really well!

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ii4QVKbXyVE&feature=relmfu"]YouTube - Battle Canyon 1878 - Kansas Tour[/ame]



Just to the north of the pueblo is Scott Lake, the lake covers some of the farm fields of El Quartelejo, a great little lake to camp and explore from.


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You will find groves of ash, cedar, cottonwood, elm, walnut, and willow trees, through out the canyons, the canyons cover about 1100 acres. There are and were many trees across Kansas, but they are in places like these, the military actually would protect some of these groves from settlers as the destruction of these groves was a transgression to the plains tribes.


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It would become the first state park in Kansas, 1928.


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In the middle of August of 1878, Dull Knife and Little Wolf of the Northern Cheyenne, pleaded with Indian agent John Miles to let the Cheyenne's return home to Montana. Half the band had died in a single year on the Oklahoma reservation. Dull Knife himself was shaking with fever as they talked. Miles asked for a year to work on the problem, and Little Wolf told him the Cheyenne's would all be dead in a year. Miles refused to relent. The next morning at sunrise, the three hundred surviving Cheyenne's, 89 Warriors and 246 women and children, broke for open country to the north, heading for their home on the powder river, over a thousand miles to the north, across a settled Kansas, while being chased by troops from the south as others tried to intercept the tribe from the east and west.


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On the 17th of August the Cheyenne were south of Dodge City, Kansas, they attacked the cattle camps just south of Dodge some whites were killed here but most telling of the fury and desperation to strike back is the fact that the Cheyenne killed everything they came upon, herds of cattle and sheep were killed out of anger and frustration. Dodge City and south western Kansas, went into a panic.


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Dull Knife said, "We cannot stay another year; we want to go now, before another year has passed, we may all be dead, and there will be none of us left to travel north." They did not care if the soldiers killed them, they said they would rather die going north than to die like dogs in the prison camp.


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Colonel. William H. Lewis, with a detachment of troops from Fort Dodge, pursued the Cheyenne towards these canyons. It is here among these canyon walls of Beaver creek where it meets Ladder creek, a place called Punished Women Forks that the Cheyenne would fight their last battle against the United States Calvary. Colonel. William H. Lewis would be the last military officer of the United States to die in battle with the Cheyenne in the state of Kansas, he would die enroute to Fort Wallace just to the north west of the canyons.


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Little Wolf and Dull Knife.


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When the Northern Cheyenne started across Kansas in 1878, the land had changed drastically, or the land had not changed but was now occupied by a lot of very nieve farmers, who had no idea of what was headed their way.


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It got ugly just south of Dodge, and regressed from there, by the time it rolled over the Oberlin Kansas, area to the north it was a horrible mess, and only got worse at Fort Robinson. But the Northern Cheyenne do not reside in Oklahoma today. The only bright spot of this story for the Northern Cheyenne!


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I have a few more pics to put up of this area, and will give the Sappa Creek raid part of this story. The map below shows the Route of the Northern Cheyenne across Kansas. where the Northern Cheyenne's route comes to a peak moving north west, and turns back north east, is where this report is at currently. If you look just north of the peak you will see the German Family site listed, thats where we are headed after the Canyons of El Quartelejo. And as a side note you will notice the Lone Tree massacre site I told of earlier, straight south of the German site, about 115 miles, these are tied together.


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Old March 10th, 2011, 04:56 PM   #64
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[QUOTE=Sod Buster;501424
In the middle of August of 1878, Dull Knife and Little Wolf of the Northern Cheyenne, pleaded with Indian agent John Miles to let the Cheyenne's return home to Montana. Half the band had died in a single year on the Oklahoma reservation. Dull Knife himself was shaking with fever as they talked. Miles asked for a year to work on the problem, and Little Wolf told him the Cheyenne's would all be dead in a year. Miles refused to relent. The next morning at sunrise, the three hundred surviving Cheyenne's, 89 Warriors and 246 women and children, broke for open country to the north, heading for their home on the powder river, over a thousand miles to the north, across a settled Kansas, while being chased by troops from the south as others tried to intercept the tribe from the east and west.[/QUOTE]


Half the band dead in one year, but Miles wanted another year to sort things out. How are people like him able to look their own families in the eye?
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Old March 10th, 2011, 05:09 PM   #65

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Oberlin, Kansas.


A really great second hand account of the story, from grandmother to grandson.


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsDPwwCjTRk"]YouTube - Forgive & Remember: Northern Cheyenne Fort Robinson (1 of 3)[/ame]



The Northern Cheyenne left the Canyons of El Quartelejo crossing the Smoky Hill River about where the 83 B.O.D. marker pics were taken. Continuing northward on their trek, raiding small farms and settlements as they went, on the 30th of september they arrived on the banks of Sappa Creek, within a few miles of the small settlement of Oberlin. With the loss of much of their horse herd and that this area held bitter memories for the Northern Cheyenne, for it was here in april, 1875, that buffalo hunters slaughtered 27 members of the tribe in an unprovoked attack. Not only men, but women and children fell under the hunters buffalo guns and . Now it was time for revenge.


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[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cJU6QwdE-dg&feature=related"]YouTube - Forgive & Remember: Northern Cheyenne Fort Robinson (2 of 3)[/ame]


The Indians spread out along the creek for ten miles or so, attacking targets of opportunity. Farmers working in their fields or hauling supplies from town were the first to fall. A thirteen year old boy out tending cattle watched in horror as the Indians shot two neighbors to death, and fled back home to warn his family. At first the settlers along Sappa Creek were not alarmed by reports of Indian activity. They had heard rumors of raids for so long that nobody really believed it could actually happen. But it was happening. The last time the Cheyenne had been in this area there were no homesteads.


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[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vddm-_F04lE"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vddm-_F04lE[/ame]


After killing several men and boys and capturing two schoolgirls, the Indians appeared at one small farm and were driven off by gunfire, losing one brave. They abandoned their two captive girls when they retreated. Moving farther along the creek, the raiders killed several more settlers. Several people from the Bridal farm ran into a stand of trees to hide just before the Indians arrived.


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Among the group was an infant girl named Pearl , who began to cry. One of the men was forced to choke the baby into silence to avoid detection and certain death for all at the hands of the raiding party. At the Laing farm, after killing the family’s two teenaged sons, the Indians piled all the furniture and bedding in the center of the floor and set it on fire. They stripped the two young Laing girls and prepared to throw them into the blaze, but Mrs. Laing begged them to spare her remaining children. After she gave them all of the money she had, they pushed the girls at her and told her to go. Mrs. Laing wrapped her daughters in her petticoats and fled to a nearby farm, only to learn that her husband had been killed earlier in the day when the atrocities began.


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The victims of the Last Indian Raid are buried in the Oberlin Cemetery, and in 1911 a monument was erected in the cemetery in honor of those lost in the massacre.


Some of the Cheyenne were returned to Kansas for trial, they would be acquitted. Picture taken in Dodge City.


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They say that Wild Hog was as much or more so in control of the warriors than Dull Knife.


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Bat Masterson, would pic these Cheyenne up in Leavenworth Kansas, they had just attended under guard, the London circus which was in town, Masterson as sheriff of Dodge would return the Cheyenne for trial.
Some times this stuff is kind of surreal.


Dodge City law enforcement, Masterson back row far right, Wyatt Earp, front row 2nd from left.



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I will get this back on to the B.O.D. and the Smoky, up the trail to Russel Springs and the German site.

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Old March 11th, 2011, 09:08 AM   #66

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knarly Dan View Post
Half the band dead in one year, but Miles wanted another year to sort things out. How are people like him able to look their own families in the eye?

There were many mistakes made by both sides of this conflict, I am trying to show both sides of this situation the best that I can.
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Old March 11th, 2011, 10:44 AM   #67

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sod Buster View Post
There were many mistakes made by both sides of this conflict, I am trying to show both sides of this situation the best that I can.

And, doin' a d----d fine job of it too, Sod!

(I'm still following your thread brother.)
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Old March 13th, 2011, 04:31 PM   #68

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Logan County, Russell Springs, Kansas.


[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pi6HXp_v44]YouTube - Native American: Cheyenne Fast War Dance ( Buffalo Calf Road Woman )[/ame]


We will pick this back up 10 miles back north of El Quartelejo, at the 83 B.O.D. marker, where we will turn back west up the trail. You are crossing from Gove County, into Logan County at this point on the trail, I do believe all Countys in Kansas are named for Indian tribes or Civil War veterans. The next county west of Logan is Wallace, then the Colorado border.


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At this point on the trail the Monuments are 7 miles back east, Fort Wallace is about 38 miles west, the German family was probably covering about 10 miles a day in their ox drawn wagon.


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The German family were about 2 days out from their last camp site on the Smoky as they rolled past this spot.
The German story did not end at that last camp site on the Smoky, or with the return of the girl captives, it faded to an old story that you read about in old history books, the girls did live on to have familys of their own, think of the storys their grand kids heard. In 1989 the Great Great Granddaughter of Sophia German, started to do family research into the tragedy, a letter sent to the Oklahoma, Historical Society, regarding information on the German tragedy had found it's way to John Sipes, a Southern Cheyenne, in Norman Oklahoma, the Great Great Grandson of Medicine Water, and Buffalo Calf Woman. He would make a phone call.


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John Sipes would call Arlene Jauken, the Great Great Grandaughter of Sophia German, what a call that had to of been, the two decendents would arange a meeting between these two familys, on the plains of western Kansas, at a lonely old camp site with the ruts of an old trail, and the depresions of shallow graves, still visible before them, dug over a hundred and sixteen years before, the year was 1990. We will pick this story back up at the German site.


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The German family was a poor family, they owned two milk cows, two calfs, two horses, two oxen, and a few chickens, the father and son were armed with two muzzle loaders. The wagon contained a feather bed and what few possessions the family of nine would need to start over in Colorado.


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Riding north from Indian territory to the south, Medicine Water, Buffalo Calf Woman, Yellow Horse, White Man, Little Sheild, Bears Heart, Big Moccasin, Rising Bull, Sharp Bulley, Hail Stone, and nine others had reached the Smoky Hill River, and were now stalking the Smoky Hill Trail.
There was a second women riding in this war party, and it would be a lucky thing for the two youngest girls.


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Medicine Water would be riding Captain Shorts Bay horse taken at the Lone Tree Masacre of the surveyers over by Meade Kansas, from earlier in this report. As you trek west up the trail 6 miles east of Russell you come to what is known as Six Mile Creek. It is here that some mystery is involved with the turn of events.
The mystery to Joanna's death, one of the sisters killed in the attack, is that it might not have happened on the north fork of the Smoky with the rest of the family west of Russell Springs, in The book The Moccasin speaks the family beleives that Joanna was killed on Six Mile Creek, six miles west of Russell Springs, the family does not beleive that Joanna's, body was ever found, only four bodies were buried on the north fork of the Smoky, for years there was controversy over where the massacre happened, some thought it was on Six Mile Creek some thought it was on the north fork about nine miles apart. The Kansas Hisorical Society says that it was Six Mile Creek and it does have an historical marker on the site but it is on private property, there is a marker on the North Fork of the Smoky, west of Russel Springs also, since the first marker on Six Mile was errected the debree from the burned out wagon was found on the North Fork of the Smoky, and four grave depresions .


Six Mile Creek.

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The story of Joanna's death goes like this. The wagon was ransacked and burned, the five girls were loaded on horses along with what was taken from the wagon, the cattle were driven along with them , they rode a few miles to the east where the band stoped to pick up their gear, saddles and extra ponys, they proceeded to the east just to the south of the B.O.D trail, when they reached Six Mile Creek they stoped and butchered and cooked the cattle, split up property from the family, and to use the term from that time the older girls were ravaged and Joanna was killed, the family bible was found here on Six Mile Creek and was how the Army would know who this family was and who had been taken captive as their names were all in the old bible. Medicine Water and his war party with the girl captives would head back south from Six Mile Creek.


six Mile Creek.

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Another war party that had been raiding a little further north along the railroad met up with Medicine Waters bunch at this spot also, the other war party had attacked a hay crew and and a bone pickers outfit (picking up buffalo bones), a nine year old boy and a fourteen year old were killed in these raids.


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Next stop Russell Springs, before moving just west to the actual site the German family were attacked at. Russel Springs was a stage stop on the B.O.D. then A Union Pacific rail town, and would later become the county seat.


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Old March 15th, 2011, 03:42 PM   #69

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Russell Springs, Kansas.


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_03OXN054M"]YouTube - prairie town[/ame]

Six miles east from the site above you come to Russell Springs, it sits 3 miles north of the river trail. The old photos below are all of Russell Springs, or the area around it, these photos would have been taken after the German tradgedy, as the area was later settled. Most think of how great it would have been back then, free land for the taking, they say that many folks could never work their way through the bureaucracy of the land office, it was ran by the government and was one big hoop jumping contest for five years to get that eighty or one hundred sixty acres of free land, some claims were jumped or lost due to an i not being doted or t crossed, i think it was like a $1.25 an acre after you had met all the requirements of the homesteading act, and a whole lot of blood sweat and tears. So the land really wasn't what you would call free.
The contest's out here as it settled sometimes came to blood shead over what town would be the county seat.


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If the bureaucrats didn't get you the drouths, grass hoppers, weather, accidents, Indians were your next worry, when people first came out here to try and homestead this land, they had no clue of dry land farming, one theory said that when so many square miles of the prairie had been plowed it would change the weather and bring rain, that did not work, the fact is this area has wet periods and dry there is no changing it, even the experts were clueless on how to farm this land, it was a learn as you go type of deal, and many would try and many not make it.
Today this area is farmed but it is heavily irrigated.

Russell Springs.


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Russell Springs. County Seat untill 1963 it's now Oakly, it was about the railroad then, now it's about I-70, in 2000 the population was 32. On September 17, 1887, Logan County, named after General John A. Logan, was organized and Russell Springs was named the temporary county seat. The earliest known settler of "Russell" Springs was William D. Russell, a cattleman that ran large herds of cattle on the open range. The cattle were watered at the clear-water springs near where the town would eventually be located. Debris of his huts were still visible when the town was first surveyed in 1886. On december 22, 1887, Russell Springs won the election and became the permenent county seat.


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As the population grew out in western Kansas it mainly followed the two railroads, the Union Pacific later called the Kansas Pacific, up the Smoky Hill River Valley up the center of the state. And the Sante Fe, to the south up the Arkansas river valley, and thats pretty much where all of your main towns are to this day in western Kansas, the rivers and rail road determined the lay out of this state long ago.
Highway 25 crosses the trail.

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By the time Russell Springs, poped up as a full fledged town the old B.O.D was just a memory, the train could get you to Denver, and the trail was usually just called the old stage road.


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A little info on Fort Wallace, just west about 15 miles.

Wallace County had several BOD Stage Stops of its own. The most prominent, namely the Pond Creek Stage Station, was situated 1 1/2 miles west of present day Wallace. A "home" station renowned for its food, this little stage stop saw so many Indian attacks that Camp Pond Creek, a military encampment, was situated right next to it. When the BOD was sold to another company in 1866 (the Indian raids were so numerous by this time that the business had become unprofitable), Camp Pond Creek moved a few miles east to the Smoky Hill river and was renamed Fort Wallace in honor of W.H.L. Wallace, a general who died at the Battle of Shiloh.


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Although Fort Wallace was no longer attached to the Butterfield Overland Despatch, soldiers stationed at Fort Wallace still had their hands full trying to protect those settlers who were moving through on their way west. Many of the most prominent trails that pioneers used cut straight through the best buffalo hunting grounds. Indians, whose livelihood depended on the buffalo, did not treat the trespassers lightly. Instead, as buffalo began to scatter and become scarce, Indians began to view their new neighbors with something less than friendly eyes. This made the presence of Fort Wallace an absolute necessity. Although according to official counts , the number of men stationed at the Fort never exceeded 350, these soldiers saw more encounters with Indians than any other Fort, rightfully earning Fort Wallace the distinction of being the "Fightin'est Fort in the West." General George Armstrong Custer was stationed at Fort Wallace and saw his first battle with the Indians not far from the fort. Other great frontier men, such as George Forsyth, Bill Comstock, Buffalo Bill Cody, and Wild Bill Hickok, were also stationed at Fort Wallace at various times.


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The majority of the buildings at Fort Wallace were made of native stone while the remaining buildings were wood. Eventually 40 buildings were constructed, enough to house and support four hundred men, even though the total number of troops topped 350 only a handful of times. Two Companies were usually enough to man the fort, but in October of 1871 14 Divisions (most of them Infantry) met at Fort Wallace. Despite the fact that Indian raids were constant and expected, for a period of 4 years the total number of troops stationed at Fort Wallace averaged just 75.
Despite the low population, the comfort level at Fort Wallace was not very high. Everyone had complaints about the food and soldiers spent a considerable portion of their pay to supplement their diets. With Fort Wallace being stationed so far from any major town, problems with the food deteriorating or rotting were rampant. Diseases such as dysentery and diarrhea killed many soldiers as did an outbreak of cholera in 1867.


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Fort Wallace was officially decommissioned on May 31, 1882, although a detachment of soldiers did remain for a time at the fort in order to prevent settlers from using the Fort grounds. By 1886, however, settlers in the region began removing vital building materials, and even entire buildings from the Fort. As there were few trees for lumbar and little time to hew rock into bricks, the ready-made materials that were Fort Wallace were especially desirable to settlers. In 1888, the Fort Wallace Reservation was opened for use to the settlers, but by this time there was little of the Fort remaining. In just 6 years nearly everything except the foundations had been removed. Absolutely no buildings are left standing at the site of Fort Wallace, and very few of the original materials remain. The Post Cemetery is all that remains of the fort as we will see a little latter.


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In the street scene below you can see the Logan County Court House on the far hillside, it was built in 1887.


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The building just to the left of the court house, is the old jail house.

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It's been the Butterfield Trail Museum since 1963. Kind of a depository of artifacts and fossils from the area.


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Last edited by Sod Buster; March 15th, 2011 at 03:53 PM.
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Old March 19th, 2011, 07:08 PM   #70

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The German Family Massacre.


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5byHU3FC4nM"]YouTube - The Lord's Prayer in Cheyenne[/ame]


That word, Massacre was used alot back then, by both sides. Mostly a matter of being in the wrong place at the wrong time, and vengence usually did not fall on the guilty but on the innocent. Buffalo Calf Woman, was a survivor of Sand Creek.

Not the German family below.


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I told of a phone call earlier in this report made to the Great Grand Daughter of Sophia German, as she had sent out some questions to the Oklahoma Historical Society about the German Family Massacre as she was doing research for her book, The Moccasin Speaks, those questions found their way to John Sipes, the Great Grand Son of Medicine Water. Some of these storys have unfolded for years, kind of like the tomb stone being placed in 2008 on the family grave in the railworker cemetery, the rededication of the soldiers of the Fort Larned cemetery, these storys are old and dusty but not totally forgotten, yet!

West out of Russel Springs, you must remember there was no Russell Springs the town in 1874, just a burnt out old stage stop on The Smoky Hill Trail.


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After that phone call in 1989 between the descendents of the German's and Medicine Water, clans, a meeting was agreeded upon, that meeting would be on the South Fork of the Smoky River, in a prairie canon called Death Hollow, on Sept 9th 1990. A letter was sent by Goerge Bush, senior to be read at the ceremony, the United States Army was represented by Colonel LaGrange, out of Fort Riley, Kansas, 150 German Family members attended, as did many Southern Cheyenne, the descendents of General Miles, from the Plains Indian Wars, were also there.


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The pic above is from that day, not sure if this is the Calvary unit out of Fort Riley, as the fort does still have a mounted unit, they are riding up the ravine to the top of the ridge that the Cheyenne attacked from.


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In the hat, in the middle is John Sipes, Medicine Waters great grand son, Colonel LaGrange sits beside him and then Arlene Jauken, Sophia's great grand daughter, Author of The Moccasin Speaks, you would really enjoy this book, i would highly recomend it! The ceremony was good for both familys, the German Family members signed a petition for the Cheyenne calling for the return of all Native American remains be returned from museums and exibits to their people to be buried, the Smithonian Museum at one time called for the heads of Indians killed in battle be sent to the museum.


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It would have taken the German family about three days from the Monuments to get to this spot on the trail, as they were making about ten to twelve miles a day with their Oxen and wagon.

I realize that through out this report I really have not pointed out the river much, but it has always been there in many of the pics, any time you see a tree line as in the photo below thats the Smoky.


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It would have been a thursday, thursday the 10th of september 1874 when the family would have rumbled over the trail and past the future site of the Logan County Court House at Russell Springs, but a few short miles from what would be their last camp as a family.


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