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Old June 26th, 2011, 01:25 PM   #1
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What did Truman do for a living?


According to wikipedia (spit)

"[Truman ran] a haberdashery at 104 West 12th Street in downtown Kansas City. After a few successful years, the store went bankrupt during the recession of 1921. Truman worked to pay off the debts until 1934."

Ok well how did he support himself in the mean time?
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Old June 26th, 2011, 01:35 PM   #2

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Active in the Democratic Party, Truman was elected a judge of the Jackson County Court (an administrative position) in 1922. He became a Senator in 1934. During World War II he headed the Senate war investigating committee, checking into waste and corruption and saving perhaps as much as 15 billion dollars.
Harry S. Truman | The White House
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Old June 26th, 2011, 02:19 PM   #3
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So he went straight from failed store owner to judge?
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Old June 26th, 2011, 02:59 PM   #4

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So he went straight from failed store owner to judge?
Yep, but in an administrative position. IIRC he looked at cases and determined which judge should be assigned to handle it. Obviously that kind of position is a prime target for graft, something the Republicans played up in 1948. I don't recall if they proved anything. (Working from memory here.)
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Old June 26th, 2011, 03:08 PM   #5

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Wasn't he also an artillery officer in WWI? Also involved in firing the last shots/battle of the war?

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Old June 26th, 2011, 03:13 PM   #6

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Wasn't he also an artillery officer in WWI? Also involved in firing the last shots/battle of the war?

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Yeah, he was in the artillery, rank of Captain.

As for the last shots of the war, several thousand folks claimed that honor, and the resulting unnecessary carnage was very regretable.
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Old June 26th, 2011, 03:19 PM   #7
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Yep, but in an administrative position. IIRC he looked at cases and determined which judge should be assigned to handle it. Obviously that kind of position is a prime target for graft, something the Republicans played up in 1948. I don't recall if they proved anything. (Working from memory here.)
Sounds like a glorified bureaucrat to me.

But I'd perfer that to his being made an actual Judge.
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Old June 26th, 2011, 03:25 PM   #8

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Sounds like a glorified bureaucrat to me.

But I'd perfer that to his being made an actual Judge.
As I understand it the law clerks who worked for the state "advised" the judges, in some cases to the point where they didn't even need to come into the office more than once a week to sign paperwork.
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Old June 26th, 2011, 03:31 PM   #9
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As I understand it the law clerks who worked for the state "advised" the judges, in some cases to the point where they didn't even need to come into the office more than once a week to sign paperwork.
So Truman was giving the advise?
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Old June 26th, 2011, 03:38 PM   #10

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So Truman was giving the advise?
The source I read was a little coy with the details, stating that reports had it that the clerks would do the actual deciding, which was then referred to as "advice" if it was questioned. People in Truman's position were known to stand ready to take the flak if things went awry, and in return they got out of most of the actual work. As few of them had law degrees this may have resulted in better work than would have been done if the appointee judges had allotted cases based on their own estimates of the cases.
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