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-   -   Is there a Difference between the Eskimos and the Inuit? (http://historum.com/american-history/27531-there-difference-between-eskimos-inuit.html)

Qymaen July 9th, 2011 10:48 AM

Is there a Difference between the Eskimos and the Inuit?
 
So I've decided to travel North and talk about Canada or specifically who is in Canada and I was wondering, is there a difference between the Eskimos and the Inuit? If so what is the difference?

A7X July 9th, 2011 11:00 AM

Eskimo and Inuit are the same thing, but Inuit is the real name, and Eskimo the given European one.

Kraken July 9th, 2011 11:04 AM

Eskimo can be seen as more of a stereotypical name for someone who lives up north in those conditions. While Inuit is the proper name of the native tribes that inhabit Nunavut etc.

Pancho35 July 9th, 2011 11:10 AM

They are the same. Eskimo is supposed to be more stereotypical and offensive I think. Best not to test it if you meet an Inuit.

Qymaen July 9th, 2011 11:45 AM

Thanks for the answers, but now I have another question. How are the Inuit and the Aleut people different?

beorna July 9th, 2011 12:03 PM

as far as i remember means Eskimo "raw meat eater" and it is the same as if you would call South Africans "kaffer" or Negros "Nigger" or japanese "Japs" etc.

Linschoten July 9th, 2011 12:30 PM

The name 'Eskimo' is not of European origin but derived from an Algonquian language; its original meaning is disputed, but it seems that it was not pejorative, but was interpreted as being so by some of the Inuit (apparently because they interpreted it as referring to the eating of raw meat, although it is hard to know why they should have taken offence at that, because the Inuit did in fact eat raw seal-meat). In any case, most or all of the Greenland and Canadian Inuit dislike the term, although it is acceptable among Alaskan Eskimoes (as one may call them) and I believe Siberian ones too. As often with such matters, the case is thus more complicated than it may at first seem.

Qymaen September 24th, 2011 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Qymaen (Post 667838)
Thanks for the answers, but now I have another question. How are the Inuit and the Aleut people different?

Bump... I'm waiting. :)

A7X September 24th, 2011 01:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beorna (Post 667860)
Negros "Nigger"

Lol, you shouldn't call them negroes or niggers! :laugh:

MrKap September 24th, 2011 04:50 PM

I was going to guess it was a regional thing, because the Aleut are from the Aleutian Island Arc Chain, but they appear to be all over.

wiki says...

Inuit
means “the people” in the Inuktitut language. An Inuk is an Inuit person. The [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inuit_language"]Inuit language[/ame] is grouped under Eskimo–Aleut languages.

--------

So Inuit is "everyone" while the Aleut would be a specific group within the Inuit People, that uses a specific language and originated from a distinct place, although might be prone to migrate.


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