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Old July 31st, 2011, 04:57 PM   #1
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Appalachian Mountains and the Proclamation Line of 1763?


On this map, I understand that the Proclamation Line of 1763 would be the western borders of the states. However, is the Proclamation Line the same thing as the Appalachian Mountains on this map?

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_TuQ1GMhHYR...es+in+1700.gif
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Old July 31st, 2011, 05:02 PM   #2

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Yes the Proclamation Line was intentionally designed to follow along the Appalachian mountains. It is not uncommon for political borders and boundaries to be based on natural boundaries.
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Old July 31st, 2011, 05:18 PM   #3

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You see correctly Fred R.
The mountains were a natural reminder of where the borderline
in stopping colonial expansion was to be. On paper at least.
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Old July 31st, 2011, 05:33 PM   #4
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It doesn't seem like this holds true for the western borders of Pennsylvania and New York though. Don't the Appalachian Mountains curve east through New York towards the New England states?
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Old July 31st, 2011, 07:18 PM   #5

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fredrogers3 View Post
It doesn't seem like this holds true for the western borders of Pennsylvania and New York though. Don't the Appalachian Mountains curve east through New York towards the New England states?
I think that that was as far as the Native American tribal union (Mohawks and Co.?) would let the Colonialist to advance in the valleys I guess? Anybody know?
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Old July 31st, 2011, 07:29 PM   #6

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A proclamation line is one thing, and enforcing it was something else. Those tough, self-sufficient, Crown-hating Scots-Irish settlers of the back country didn't let a proclamation line stop them from expanding into the wilderness. Don't forget Daniel Boone, who started "long hunting" into Kentucky around 1750 or so. The area around the rivers of the Monongahela and the Ohio were claimed early on by white settlers, since they were the highways of the frontier.
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Old July 31st, 2011, 07:35 PM   #7

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Yeah. The King didnt try too hard to enforce anything on us.
He did send Patric Ferguson and an army of torries up towards our neck of the woods once, though. He allowed he was a going to bring "fire and sword" upon us.

So, we just sort of shot him and his British army to ribbons at Kings Mountain, but we did indeed give him some of Appalachia.

6 feet of it, to be exact.

The demarcation line of 1763. A common joke around here. I wish I knew exactly where it was. I would go and disrespect it. And that is how the folks felt back then.

They had been persecuted by the British government back in Ulster, you see. The "Penal Laws" hurt our people as much as it did the Catholic Irish. And so, they had no use for the Kings laws or rules.

They were good people, the Scots Irish of Appalachia. But as my granny used to say, "As independent as a hog on ice".

A little known fact is that we formed our own state after the war, the State of Franklin. I suspect that if the rest of America wouldnt have declared independence from Great Britain in 1776, the Scots-Irish of Appalachia would have done it sooner or later, whether anybody else did or not.

They did send an emissary to Spain to discuss Spanish recognition of an independent nation here, where the State of Franklin was (East Tennessee). But Congress helped us to form the State of Tennessee in 1796. And then Tennessee seceded from the Union in 1861. East Tennessee was mostly loyal, and tried to secede from the rest of Tennessee and get our own state out of it.

So, you can see that the Scots-Irish of Appalachia were sort of independent minded.

These Scots-Irish didnt care too much about what the King had to say about anything.

Last edited by Richard Stanbery; July 31st, 2011 at 07:58 PM.
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Old July 31st, 2011, 08:11 PM   #8

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speculatin' View Post
A proclamation line is one thing, and enforcing it was something else. Those tough, self-sufficient, Crown-hating Scots-Irish settlers of the back country didn't let a proclamation line stop them from expanding into the wilderness. Don't forget Daniel Boone, who started "long hunting" into Kentucky around 1750 or so. The area around the rivers of the Monongahela and the Ohio were claimed early on by white settlers, since they were the highways of the frontier.
True points.
Once the French & Indian War was over, colonies looked westward for
future expansion and land speculation. A fence less border was a
mere speed bump to the future westward movement.
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Old July 31st, 2011, 08:13 PM   #9

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Quote:
Originally Posted by crossroadclarence View Post
I think that that was as far as the Native American tribal union (Mohawks and Co.?) would let the Colonialist to advance in the valleys I guess? Anybody know?
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjadams View Post
True points.
Once the French & Indian War was over, colonies looked westward for
future expansion and land speculation. A fence less border was a
mere speed bump to the future westward movement.
Am I on the same page here, TJ? My US history is not so hot.
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Old July 31st, 2011, 08:18 PM   #10

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I'm not too keen myself on Northern Indian tribes myself, but all those
millions of acres was just too much of a tease to resist for the colonies
regardless of tribe.
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