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Old November 16th, 2012, 03:56 PM   #431

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Hahahahahahahahaha. There is an 1850 one. They didn't do the census every year. He's not listed in it either.
Boy that went right over your head. I wasn't saying there was a census every year. I was saying that just because he didn't own them in 1860 doesn't mean he didn't own them prior to that census.
Arlington, Bobby Lee, and the 'Peculiar Institution' - Ta-Nehisi Coates - The Atlantic

Lee first came to slave ownership in 1829 when, newly out of West Point, he inherited several slaves from his mother's estate. Lee quickly discovered, Pryor writes, that for him slaveholding represented "an uncomfortable stewardship." He found supervision of the their work to be distracting from his own career, and disliked the daily details of managing and providing for them. He found slaves to be, in Pryor's words, "more trouble than they were worth." To relieve himself of the day-to-day responsibility for them, and to provide additional cash for his household, Lee soon took to hiring out his bondsmen and -women. This practice, common among slaveholders in Lee's circle, makes it difficult to track his ownership of slaves in detail over the next three decades. Freeman believed that Lee had divested himself of slaves by 1847, based on Freeman's failure to find any relevant tax records, and Lee's own son, Robert Jr., claimed that his father had manumitted all his slaves "a long time before the war." Pryor counters that Lee definitely owned slaves as late as 1852, considered buying more shortly before the war began, and throughout the war itself used slaves as personal servants. Whether Lee directly and personally owned slaves at a given point before or during the war, Pryor would argue, is almost immaterial, for presence of slaves and the benefit of their labor was an intimate and familiar part of Lee's daily life until the end of the Civil War.

Please apply aloe to that burn.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 03:58 PM   #432

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You said you would read the "right book about him". What book would that be?
A book that doesn't heap unworthy praise on him nor one that is a hatchet job.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 04:35 PM   #433

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Click the image to open in full size.Is the little girl, who I consider to be White, a slave of Lee's? Is there anyway to find out for sure?
The adult is Charles S. Syphax. The child is William's grandson William Syphax.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 04:43 PM   #434

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The adult is Charles S. Syphax. The child is William's grandson William Syphax.
oops, my bad. It's harder to tell gender in the older pics since all babies were in gowns. Thanks for the correction. So gentleman and grandson were slaves at Arlington?
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Old November 16th, 2012, 04:56 PM   #435

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Lee had no slaves of his own. His wife inherited slaves and it took 5 years to carry out the wishes of the will, but he freed them. Virginia law stated that that the slaves must have funding to succeed on their own before they could be freed. Lee managed to emancipate the slaves of his father-in-law. He did not own any himself.
Lee inherited slaves from his mother in 1829. He was required by George Custis' will to free those slaves no more than 5 years from Custis' death.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 05:10 PM   #436

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Lee inherited slaves from his mother in 1829. He was required by George Custis' will to free those slaves no more than 5 years from Custis' death.
I wonder if you would furnish a reference to this statement?

Lee didn't inherit slaves. He was appointed Executor of the Custis estate.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 05:11 PM   #437

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Ok so it seems the light skinned slaves were a product of the Custis men. I really admired GWP Custis too. Pity.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 05:18 PM   #438

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After Custis' death in 1857, Lee took leave from the army to act as executor of the Custis estate and manager of Arlington and the other Custis lands. Though Arlington House never belonged to Lee (it belonged to his wife), he was the effective master of Arlington after 1857. Between 1857-1861, he attempted to reorganize the slaves into a more efficient labor force, cleaned up the grounds, hired a new overseer and supervised the planting of crops. He also oversaw extensive rebuilding around the plantation. He virtually rebuilt the overseer's house at the farm and the stable west of the mansion. He also fixed the roof of the mansion and took out a fire insurance policy on the mansion and the barn.

Robert Edward Lee - Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial
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Old November 16th, 2012, 05:20 PM   #439
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Lee inherited slaves from his mother in 1829. He was required by George Custis' will to free those slaves no more than 5 years from Custis' death.
It appears you are correct about that Fiver. It is a shame that Unrevised was suspended after I injected a detail that was incorrect.

I apologize to you Unrevised for that completely my friend.

I will agree on one point with Unrevised, Yankee does appear to have ulterior motives. She is not what she appears to be. I find that interesting enough to stay tuned to these events.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 05:26 PM   #440

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I wonder if you would furnish a reference to this statement?

Lee didn't inherit slaves. He was appointed Executor of the Custis estate.
I don't want to speak for Fiver but I got the impression he is speaking on two different inheritances. He inherited slaves from his mother that were indeed his then separately he was the executor of the Custis estate with those slaves. I could be wrong.
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