Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > American History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

American History American History Forum - United States, Canada, Mexico, Central and South America


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 14th, 2012, 01:51 AM   #11

diddyriddick's Avatar
Forum Curmudgeon
 
Joined: May 2009
From: A tiny hamlet in the Carolina Sandhills
Posts: 13,137

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chui View Post
Minor nitpick: The Wasp diddriddick listed is the second CV called Wasp. The original was sunk by a Japanese submarine during the Guadalcanal campaign.
You are correct sir. There are probably other mistakes in that list if anybody takes the time to look into it.
diddyriddick is online now  
Remove Ads
Old January 15th, 2012, 10:54 AM   #12
Citizen
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 26
Blog Entries: 2

Does anyone know how quickly the U.S. carrier force was reduced after the war? I guess what I am wanting to know is how many carriers did the U.S. have by, say, the Korean Conflict? I would imagine most if not all of the escort carriers were almost immediately scrapped, but are there any good books or online sources discussing this?
SiegeOfPetersburg is offline  
Old January 15th, 2012, 11:00 AM   #13
CT9
Suspended indefinitely
 
Joined: Aug 2011
From: NY to TX
Posts: 320

Quote:
Originally Posted by pikeshot1600 View Post
This is just a comment about salvage. No attempts at salvage were envisioned as the ships expended at Bikini were obsolete and intended for the breakers yard anyway. Several battleships were expended, but those all dated from before WW I (1910-1913). Saratoga was laid down I think about 1920. The ships were used up.

There were the usual congressional expressions of outrage that all that shipping was wasted (1946 was a congressional election year). Efforts to salvage and transport scrap were not deemed worthwhile, notwithstanding the limited understanding of radioactivity and its effects.
Wow thank god, so what you are saying is that if it were more cost effective to use the scrap metal they would have?
CT9 is offline  
Old January 15th, 2012, 11:13 AM   #14
Historian
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 6,239

Quote:
Originally Posted by CT9 View Post
Wow thank god, so what you are saying is that if it were more cost effective to use the scrap metal they would have?
No, the navy was not interested in the salvage to any real degree. The purpose of the tests was to assess the damage to ships at various distances from, and at various angles to the atomic bomb's blast at "ground zero." The costs of development etc. probably outweighed the value of the scrap metal.

The ships were expendable, but in the absence of the Bikini tests, there might have been some sent to the breakers. Still, old ships are only worth so much - even as scrap. Cost/benefit and all that.
pikeshot1600 is offline  
Old January 17th, 2012, 07:04 PM   #15

Pauke! Pauke!'s Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 228

Quote:
Originally Posted by SiegeOfPetersburg View Post
Does anyone know how quickly the U.S. carrier force was reduced after the war? I guess what I am wanting to know is how many carriers did the U.S. have by, say, the Korean Conflict? I would imagine most if not all of the escort carriers were almost immediately scrapped, but are there any good books or online sources discussing this?
This website claims to lists the fate of all US Carriers:

Fate of aircrafts carriers in the US Navy

This websites lists Carriers and Carrier Based Squadrons deployed during the Korean Conflict:

Korean War order of battle

This website has Korean War: Chronology of U.S. Pacific Fleet Operations

Korean War Naval Chronology, June-Dec. 1950

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.
Pauke! Pauke! is offline  
Old January 18th, 2012, 05:19 PM   #16

botully's Avatar
With the Ball People
 
Joined: Feb 2011
From: Amelia, Virginia, USA
Posts: 2,927

Quote:
Originally Posted by SiegeOfPetersburg View Post
I would imagine most if not all of the escort carriers were almost immediately scrapped, but are there any good books or online sources discussing this?
A quick look at US Carriers: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman shows that some were converted back to merchant ships, some were broken up 1946/47 (probably damaged), and a good number were mothballed until stricken and scrapped 1959/60.
botully is offline  
Old January 21st, 2012, 11:51 AM   #17

Vladimir's Avatar
Citizen
 
Joined: Oct 2009
From: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 25

This is quite informative - if America had the ability to create almost 100 aircraft carriers by the end of the WWII, imagine the potential of the U.S. still in the 21st century.
Vladimir is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > American History

Tags
carrier, end, numbers, ww2


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Solution to the Carrier Isoroku295 War and Military History 131 March 30th, 2011 03:34 PM
First night operations from a carrier at sea Terrible Turk War and Military History 8 December 19th, 2010 05:31 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.