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Old January 26th, 2012, 03:50 AM   #101

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To read your postings Balt, I have to cover a third of the screen to cover your avatar. LOL
now now Mr. Adams, we must work together to lead the forum to consensus. All this partisan posting leads to polarization, intransigence, and stalemate. Let those of history lead! Historum and its commitment to intelligent conversation on the events that shape our world shall provide a proper example for us all.

Ok Ok, a bit much to ask of a simple history forum. but, wouldn't it be nice. . . . .
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Old January 26th, 2012, 04:27 AM   #102

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It is if you are Ty Cobb. He was known (and hated) for sliding high with the cleats up.
True. He was a fierce warrior while the game was on. He'd tell opposing infielders,,
"I'm going to take second (or third), don't get in my way and you won't get hurt"
LOVE TY COBB!
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Old January 26th, 2012, 04:29 AM   #103

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Originally Posted by Baltis View Post
now now Mr. Adams, we must work together to lead the forum to consensus. All this partisan posting leads to polarization, intransigence, and stalemate. Let those of history lead! Historum and its commitment to intelligent conversation on the events that shape our world shall provide a proper example for us all.

Ok Ok, a bit much to ask of a simple history forum. but, wouldn't it be nice. . . . .
If I changed my avatar to Ron Paul, you can bet your house lightening would strike within ten minutes.
Maybe I should be a weatherman?
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Old January 26th, 2012, 04:40 AM   #104

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If I changed my avatar to Ron Paul, you can bet your house lightening would strike within ten minutes.
Maybe I should be a weatherman?
Hope not, Ron is my Congressman. Also a good man. A voice from the fringe but still found a place in the nation's political debate. I hope history is kind to Ron Paul.
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Old January 26th, 2012, 05:11 AM   #105

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Confederate President Jefferson Davis and his counterpart, US President Abraham Lincoln
both shared a horrific event while the US Civil war was fought: both men had a young son die.
On 30 April 1864 Davis and his wife, Varina, lost their five year old son Joe Davis in a fall from the high veranda at the Confederate White House in Richmond, VA.
On 20 February 1862 Lincoln and his wife, Mary, lost their eleven year old son William to typhoid
fever.
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Old January 26th, 2012, 06:55 AM   #106

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If you're a movie buff, then you know of Buster Keaton's Civil War silent-classic, "The General" (1926)
It was based on a very real event: "Andrews Raid" or "The Great Locomotive Chase" of 1862.
Union forces, dressed as civilians, led by civilian James J. Andrews, rode a train into Confederate
territory to do as much damage to the rail system as possible. Confederate forces did chase them
in their own locomotive, the Texas. The Union party was captured, some were executed, including
the leader, Mr. Andrews, who was hung as a spy.
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Old January 26th, 2012, 06:56 AM   #107

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If you're a movie buff, then you know of Buster Keaton's Civil War silent-classic, "The General" (1926)
It was based on a very real event: "Andrews Raid" or "The Great Locomotive Chase" of 1862.
Union forces, dressed as civilians, led by civilian James J. Andrews, rode a train into Confederate
territory to do as much damage to the rail system as possible. Confederate forces did chase them
in their own locomotive, the Texas. The Union party was captured, some were executed, including
the leader, Mr. Andrews, who was hung as a spy.
Click the image to open in full size.
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Old January 26th, 2012, 07:05 AM   #108

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Originally Posted by tjadams Click the image to open in full size.
Quote:
Who was the last?
Revolutionary War:
Daniel Bakeman, John Gray, Samuel Downing and Lemuel Cook. All died between 1866-1869.
War of 1812:
Hiram Cronk-1905
Mexican-American War:
Owen T. Edgar-1929
US Civil War:
Albert Woolson (Union)-1956
Pleasant Crump (CSA)-1951 (the last probable survivor died from 1951-53) There are claims
that the last survivor, either side, was Walter Williams-1959.
Indian Wars:
Frederick Fraske-1973
Spanish-American War:
Jones Morgan-1993
WWI:
Frank Buckles-2011
The last surviving veteran of WW1 is Florence Green who served in the Women's Royal Air Force she is still going strong although the tenth oldest person in Britain.
Three months after Buckles died, Charles Choules a British Born Australian Navy veteran who has been at Gallipoli and saw the German fleet scuttling died May 2011.
Everyone knows, or should know about Harry patch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RusEvo View Post
Fascinating. The Civil War seems like ancient history, but there are people alive today who will remember meeting its participants. Also some of those Civil War soldiers would have later been aware of modern technology like jets, movies and telephones.

I don't know why such details fascinate me, but they do.
The lady who did the flowers at our church when I was a youngster was the daughter of a trooper in the 8th Hussars who served in the Crimea and Boer War veterans were ten a penny in the 1960s.

Let's internationalise this:
Last survivor of Trafalgar ---Pedro Martinez (1789–1898) Spanish side.
---Joseph Sutherland (1789–1890) British side.

Last survivor of Rourke's Drift-- Frank Bourne (1854–1945)
Last survivor of the Zulu Wars-- Charles Wallace Warden (d. 1953)
Last survivor of the Boer War---George Frederick Ives (1881–1993)
Last survivor of the Irish uprising Dan Keating (1902–2007)

Frank Bourne who fought off the Zulus with single shot Martini-Henrys and a bayonet and had gone to battle behind Ox-waggons, lived long enough ( he died on VE Day) to see V2 missiles and Jet aircraft overhead.

Last edited by Ancientgeezer; January 26th, 2012 at 07:11 AM.
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Old January 26th, 2012, 07:10 AM   #109

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Thanks A_ for the information, but since this is an American History thread, I focus
on just US names.
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Old January 26th, 2012, 07:30 AM   #110

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Confederate General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson was accidentally shot by his own men on 2 May 1863. He died from his wounds eight days later. In the shooting, he had to have his left arm removed. The Reverend Beverley Tucker Lacy took Jackson's arm, wrapped it in a blanket and rode to his brother's home, Ellwood and buried it.
In 1903 Confederate Lieutenant James Power Smith placed a marker on the spot of Jackson's arm. Fifty eight years later in 1921 U.S. Marines were
conducting training maneuvers nearby & General Smedley Butler did not believe Jackson's arm was buried at the Ellwood farm. He ordered a squad of men to dig under the marker. His men found the arm bone surprising General Butler. He ordered a bronze plaque attached to the stone marker
and had it reburied.
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