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Old February 24th, 2012, 02:20 PM   #1

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Why do you spell it "color"?


Something that always irritates me is that anytime I'm reading something American the words colour, honour, labour and harbour are always spelled without a "u". I don't mean irritated like "Fecking Americans! Learn how to spell!". It's more like "Uh. That's a bit annoying. Oh yeah, they spell it differently".

I'm not trying to be condescending or anything, trying to make you speak "proper" English, it's just every time I see the word "color" it looks wrong to me. So could any of you "honorable" people please tell me why you spell it "color" and how this came about.

Also, as bonus, David Mitchell raises some other good points in this video which I'd also like you to explain.

This isn't me trying to give out about American-English, I'd just like to learn a bit more about it.
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Old February 24th, 2012, 02:22 PM   #2

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuatha De Danann View Post
Something that always irritates me is that anytime I'm reading something American the words colour, honour, labour and harbour are always spelled without a "u". I don't mean irritated like "Fecking Americans! Learn how to spell!". It's more like "Uh. That's a bit annoying. Oh yeah, they spell it differently".

I'm not trying to be condescending or anything, trying to make you speak "proper" English, it's just every time I see the word "color" it looks wrong to me. So could any of you "honorable" people please tell me why you spell it "color" and how this came about.

Also, as bonus, David Mitchell raises some other good points in this video which I'd also like you to explain.
Dear America... | David Mitchell's SoapBox - YouTube

This isn't me trying to give out about American-English, I'd just like to learn a bit more about it.
We're a frugal people. We don't like to waste u's.
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Old February 24th, 2012, 02:28 PM   #3
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Who cares, the fact that you even made a thread about it is too much. I have no clue, but I'm not going to start throwing u's in because it doesn't sound like a u when I say it. It's like your awful spelling of centre or theatre, get over it.
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Old February 24th, 2012, 02:35 PM   #4

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I like the English spelling. I like to put a line through my sevens also.
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Old February 24th, 2012, 02:38 PM   #5

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Originally Posted by CT9 View Post
Who cares, the fact that you even made a thread about it is too much. I have no clue, but I'm not going to start throwing u's in because it doesn't sound like a u when I say it. It's like your awful spelling of centre or theatre, get over it.
Actually we spell it centre and theatre too. I thought it was the Americans who spelled it "theater" and "center", but I don't know. That's exactly why I started this, because I want to know.
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Old February 24th, 2012, 02:40 PM   #6

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Yes we spell it center and theater here in America.
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Old February 24th, 2012, 02:41 PM   #7

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Documents from past ages in English are full of terrible spelling as we see them today, as many people wrote based on what they heard.
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Old February 24th, 2012, 02:51 PM   #8

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CT9 View Post
. It's like your awful spelling of centre or theatre, get over it.
Sorry,what?
Whats awful about it..its English...dont call it awful because you decided to change it.
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Old February 24th, 2012, 02:58 PM   #9

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Color, labor and honor are all Latin words - without the "u". So actually the American spelling is more "conservative" and true to the words' origins than the English!
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Old February 24th, 2012, 02:59 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuatha De Danann View Post
Actually we spell it centre and theatre too. I thought it was the Americans who spelled it "theater" and "center", but I don't know. That's exactly why I started this, because I want to know.
lol I know how you spell it we spell it theater and center... and yea its awful so what get over it, I don't care, I didn't make a thread... It's named after your country big deal, none of you living today had anything to do with the creation of it so who are you to comment on spelling. What's awful is that it isn't pronounced like re it is er.
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