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Old November 21st, 2012, 07:35 AM   #31

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In my mind it has been Isa-TIE but I have no real idea.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 08:21 AM   #32

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^ Thanks. I'll go with that.
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Old January 12th, 2013, 05:54 AM   #33

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German Sisters


During the battle at McClellan Creek, Lt. Baldwin's men discovered two young white girls among the captives named Julia and Adelaide German. The two little girls had been held for several weeks after their family's wagon was attacked in southwest Kansas on the way to Colorado. Their parents and brother were killed defending the family and the five girls were taken prisoner. A short time later, the oldest girl showed too much independence and was killed in front of the other four. The remaining four found themselves split between two bands of Indians who were on the run and had very little food for themselves. Colonel Miles described them, "they were the most emaciated mortals I have ever seen. Their little hands were like birds claws. They had been forced to travel rapidly by night and by day with the Indians in their long journeys, but with insufficient and coarse food. Their condition excited the deepest sympathy of the brave troops. When the officers and soldiers looked upon these poor unfortunates, warm tears could be seen coursing down their bronzed faces. It nerved every man to heroic endeavor to avenge the wrong and rescue those still in the hands of the savages."

Miles let it be known among the Indians that no surrender could be had until the other two German sisters were released. Several months later the Indians were starving and needed to surrender. Chief Stone Calf recovered the girls and started leading his band back to the reservation in hopes their surrender would be accepted. Miles reunited the sisters and sent them all to Fort Leavenworth to a newly appointed guardian. At Miles recommendation, $10,000 was withheld from the tribe's annuities and set up in funds of $2,500 for each girl.

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Old January 12th, 2013, 06:41 AM   #34

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Good to see you blow the dust of this thread.
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Old January 12th, 2013, 06:49 AM   #35

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I recently got hold of

Personal Recollections and Observations of General Nelson A. Miles, Volume 1 (Personal Recollections & Observations of General Nelson A. M) (v. 1): Nelson A. Miles, Robert Wooster: 9780803281806: Amazon.com: Books
Personal Recollections and Observations of General Nelson A. Miles, Volume 1 (Personal Recollections & Observations of General Nelson A. M) (v. 1): Nelson A. Miles, Robert Wooster: 9780803281806: Amazon.com: Books


The new volume reminded me that I got the war started in my blog but haven't yet written about the actual expeditions that comprise the Red River War. Anyway, workin' on it this morning and thought the German girls might make a an interesting side story to get the thread going again.
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Old January 15th, 2013, 08:41 AM   #36

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Captain W. Lyman - One Cool Character


My next blog entry remains in progress but covers the Battle for Lyman's Wagon Train. Here is a small bit of history from the occasion to supplement what will come on that engagement.

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On the 10th of September, 1874 Captain Wyllis Lyman found himself surrounded by several hundred Comanche and Kiowa warriors. The wagon train formed into corral, his men dug in for the siege, only the water on hand, Lyman sent the folllowing polite understatement of a plea for help to Colonel Lewis at Camp Supply:

In the field near Washita river
3 o'clock, p.m. Sept 10, 1874

Commanding Officer
Camp Supply,

Sir:

I have the honor to report that I am corralled by Comanches, two miles north of the Washita on Gen'l Miles trail. We have been engaged since yesterday morning, having moved since first firing, about 12 miles. I consider it injudicious to attempt to proceed further, in view of the importance of my train, and the broken ground ahead. It was nearly stampeded yesterday. commnication with Gen'l Miles is closed. My scout very properly will not return.

Lt. Lewis is dangerously wounded through the knee and I think he will die if he has no medical assistance. The Assistant Wagoner McCoy is mortally wounded, I fear. Sergeant DeArmon, Co I, 5th Infantry is killed, a dozen mules disabled.

I think I may properly ask quick aid especially for Lieut. Lewis, a most valuable officer. I have only a small pool of rain water for the men which will dry up today.

I estimate the number of Indians vaguely at several hundred (as Lieut. Baldwin did), whom we have punished somewhat.

Scout Marshall, who left Camp Supply, I am told, has not reached me.

I have but twelve mounted men - West made a pretty charge with them yesterday.

Very Respectfully
Your Obedient Servant,
W. Lyman
Capt. 5th Infantry
Commdg. Train Guard

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Old January 16th, 2013, 03:29 PM   #37

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Nelson A. Miles


I finished and posted the most recent chapter of the Red River Blog, it is at: http://www.historum.com/blogs/baltis...gon-train.html

Hope it isn't too long for a blog entry.


Anyway, Nelson A. Miles. The Red River Campaign was his first (of many) Indian campaign and it really didn't go that well for him. Certainly no disgrace but he was unable to ever draw the Indians into battle or find significant villages. But, that is the blog story.

For this post, a little insight into the man himself. Nelson Miles was a highly educated man who wrote very well. He fancied himself a lover of nature and especially the Plains Indians. Of the infamous Sand Creek massacre, Miles had this to say:

"The Sand Creek massacre is perhaps the foulest and most unjustifiable crime in the annals of America. It was planned by and excuted under the personal direction of J M Chivington * * * . The details of the massacre are too revolting to be enumerated * * *. But for that horrible butchery it is a fair presumption that ll the subsequent wars with the Cheyennes and Arapahoes and their kindred tribes might possibly have been averted. * * * Fleeing women, holding up their hands and praying for mercy, were shot down; infants were killed and scalped in derision; men were tortured and mutilated in a manner that would put to shame the savages of interior Africa."
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