Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > American History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

American History American History Forum - United States, Canada, Mexico, Central and South America


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old October 14th, 2012, 07:58 PM   #1

Sphynx's Avatar
Citizen
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 24
Why did it take so long for the United States to put an end to slavery, when it was o


Just a thought. Please discuss below.
Sphynx is offline  
Remove Ads
Old October 14th, 2012, 08:17 PM   #2

tjadams's Avatar
Epicurean
 
Joined: Mar 2009
From: Texas
Posts: 25,396
Blog Entries: 6

A very complex answer,very complex.
The US, as a whole, North, Middle and South, didn't
like slavery, but it was so deeply woven into the lives,
careers and industry of some states & people, that to simply
manumit the slaves would cause a large issue of what to
do with them as a free people. Doing so in the process
would have required a lot of legal local and state laws being
re-written and states had a lot more power than they do today.
tjadams is offline  
Old October 14th, 2012, 08:24 PM   #3
Jedi Knight
 
Joined: Nov 2010
From: Indiana
Posts: 4,761

Slaves were tied up in collateral so that the slave owners didn't really own their slaves a lot of the time. You can't free what you can't own.
Mike McClure is offline  
Old October 14th, 2012, 08:53 PM   #4

UberHistorian1's Avatar
Academician
 
Joined: Oct 2012
From: New York
Posts: 74

and although they didnt "like" slavery, there was still that feeling of racial superiority as well as a sense of mystery. people feared the consequences of letting slaves run freely through the streets. it was considered to be for the safety of the slaves as well as the american people that they remain under control
UberHistorian1 is offline  
Old October 14th, 2012, 09:28 PM   #5

NEW ARK?'s Avatar
Soul Power
 
Joined: Sep 2009
From: USA
Posts: 236

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjadams View Post
A very complex answer,very complex.
The US, as a whole, North, Middle and South, didn't
like slavery, but it was so deeply woven into the lives,
careers and industry of some states & people, that to simply
manumit the slaves would cause a large issue of what to
do with them as a free people. Doing so in the process
would have required a lot of legal local and state laws being
re-written and states had a lot more power than they do today.

What do you mean by "as a whole" they did not like it?
Would a large portion of the country secede from the Union and fight a war to uphold/defend and die for something they did not like? I think it had a lot more involved in it than just careers and economics. I tend to think that it would be impossible to support slavery without being a racist. The courts of the US declared African-Americans not fully human and therefore a piece of property; and I think a lot of people, even many who opposed slavery, believed that also. I would have to disagree with your statement that "as a whole" the country did not "like" slavery. I think a lot of people "liked" it very much.
NEW ARK? is offline  
Old October 14th, 2012, 09:45 PM   #6

tjadams's Avatar
Epicurean
 
Joined: Mar 2009
From: Texas
Posts: 25,396
Blog Entries: 6

I don't know what part of "as a whole" you don't understand.
Maybe I should have written "As a whole the nation tolerated slavery."
tjadams is offline  
Old October 14th, 2012, 10:02 PM   #7

Rongo's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Ohio
Posts: 5,685

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sphynx View Post
Just a thought. Please discuss below.
Some of the richest, most powerful people in America were dependent on slavery for their lifestyle. And even though the vast majority of Americans were not, many of them were very concerned about the ramifications of suddenly freeing such a large population of people they considered to be an "inferior" race and incorporating them into the general population.
Rongo is offline  
Old October 15th, 2012, 04:28 AM   #8

Jax Historian's Avatar
Carpetbagger
 
Joined: Jul 2012
From: Here
Posts: 2,468
Blog Entries: 8

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rongo View Post
Some of the richest, most powerful people in America were dependent on slavery for their lifestyle. And even though the vast majority of Americans were not, many of them were very concerned about the ramifications of suddenly freeing such a large population of people they considered to be an "inferior" race and incorporating them into the general population.
that's essentially correct. And you can add to it that for decades Southerns had been promoting the benefits of slavery, both for whites and for blacks (paternalism) through education, religion, public speeches, etc. Many southerners, and even some northerners, bought into these ideas. Often non-slave-holding southerners thought highly of the rich planters and wished to emulate their life-styles (although not all southerners did). Slavery was a deeply engrained ideology that got more systematically entrenched in the South as the 19th century progressed. While abolitionism in the north also grew during this period, it had only a little affect in the south.
Jax Historian is offline  
Old October 15th, 2012, 04:52 AM   #9

Jake10's Avatar
Guardian Knight
 
Joined: Oct 2010
From: Canada
Posts: 10,448
Blog Entries: 3

Social changes in every society take time. When laws that contradict a practice that has gone on for a long time are put in place, people reject them and break them. It is only through enforcing them and educating people of the need for such laws that societies accept them. The idea of freeing slaves in America was not accepted even after the war. Many slaves had inferiority complexions, and there were slave owners who did their best to maintain that.
Jake10 is offline  
Old October 15th, 2012, 04:56 AM   #10

Rongo's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Ohio
Posts: 5,685

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jax Historian View Post
...While abolitionism in the north also grew during this period, it had only a little affect in the south.
Indeed, and this is largely because of the danger of being an abolitionist in the South, where all the power was in the hands of the slavocracy. If you were an abolitionist in the South, you either kept your mouth shut or you moved North, like Hinton Helper and the Grimke sisters. I'm doing some fascinating research right now on the part that Southern abolitionists played in starting and spreading the abolitionist movement in the North. I'll be posting a new thread about it before too long (hopefully).
Rongo is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > American History

Tags
end, long, slavery, states, united


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How did slavery in the northern states end? Jake10 American History 34 August 17th, 2012 09:51 AM
How long will the United States surive? Robespierre Speculative History 26 June 28th, 2011 08:01 AM
Civil War about Slavery or States' Rights Patito de Hule American History 80 April 22nd, 2010 06:47 AM
Why did it take people so long to realise that slavery is wrong? Ckris Philosophy, Political Science, and Sociology 154 March 6th, 2010 08:29 AM
United States Zapped PADDYBOY Speculative History 9 December 21st, 2008 06:43 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.