Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > American History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

American History American History Forum - United States, Canada, Mexico, Central and South America


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 7th, 2012, 12:51 PM   #21
Historian
 
Joined: Oct 2009
From: San Diego
Posts: 2,178

One of my favorite old west characters is Jim Beckwourth.
A Half Black freedman who went out west during the Mountain Man fur trading era of the mid 1830's

He ended up being adopted by the Crow and living with them 12 years. He heavily influenced the Crow to trade with the Whites, rather than just raiding them. He ended up being paid by the fur company to bring in Crow fur traders and this lead to the long lived alliance between the Crow and Whites that saw Crow scouts serving with most US military units during the indian wars.

He also discovered the lowest pass across the Sierras, and his early life story was chronicled by a western pulp writer... in a work long thought to be exaggerated because it was full of unknown names like 'Savrain'.... it was not until the late 20th century that historians realized the Author of the book was misspelling person and place names correctly pronounced by Beckwourth... 'Savrain", for example, turned out to be the St. Vrain mentioned above.

Beckworth ened up being accused by some historians of being the guy who gave the Mandans the smallpox infected blankets that destroyed the tribe...however, this was not possible as Beckwourth was in Washington DC at the time.

As an old guy, and renowned western scout, it was Beckwourth who Chivington drafted to guide his militia to the Sand Creek encampment.
However... testimony of those present stated that Beckwourth seemed "confused and lost" and led Chivington on a week long wild goose chase, getting no where near the Sand Creek encampment. It is almost certain that Beckwourth knew where he was at every moment and purposely led Chivington astray, feigning the confusion of age to prevent Chivington from accusing him of purposely sabotaging his raid..

Ultimately, Chivington forced one of the Bent brothers to lead him to the encampment using threats.

Beckwourth went to visit his beloved Crow one last time, and fell ill, possibly from food poisoning... and died among the Crow.
sculptingman is offline  
Remove Ads
Old December 7th, 2012, 03:27 PM   #22
Suspended indefinitely
 
Joined: Jun 2012
From: USA
Posts: 4,015

Being from Mississippi, I find the story(s) of Big Harpe and Little Harpe from the late 1700s to be interesting. The history on them is pretty sketchy, but they were certainly killers of the worst kind. They were Micajah Harpe and Wiley Harpe, they were both large men, and their reputation as murderers was so bad that many of their relatives changed their last names to names like Harper, Harp or even Earp, as rumor has it that Wyatt Earp was a relative.

Whether they were roaming the Natchez Trace, or other traces, or paths through the woods, they robbed and murdered on land or acting as river pirates. It is estimated that they killed between 25 and 40 people, but the count could have been much higher, and it excludes quite a few of their own infant children that they also murdered.

Big Harpe met his maker in 1799, wounded and captured by a posse. After he confessed to 18 murders, he was shot again and decapitated. His head was placed on a pike.

Click the image to open in full size.

Little Harpe lasted another 4 years or so. He decided to collect a bounty on a pirate named Samuel Mason, a friend of his. He killed Mason with a tomahawk and went into town to collect the bounty. Poor Little Harpe was recognized in town, and hanged. His head was placed on a pole along the Natchez road.

Revolutionary Killers: Harpe Brothers, Serial or Spree?

Last edited by Virgil; December 7th, 2012 at 03:51 PM.
Virgil is offline  
Old December 8th, 2012, 06:37 AM   #23

Baltis's Avatar
Goat Whisperer
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Texas
Posts: 3,113
Blog Entries: 30
Harpes - Random acts of Violence


Big and Little Harpe might well be considered our nation's first serial killers. There is one story of them hanging out with the rough crowd at Cave-in-Rock that I found memorable. It seems a pair of families were captured by the outlaws after a battle in which several members were killed. "the Harpes, seeing an opportunity to give their fellow criminals an exhibition of brutality, stripped one of the captives, tied him to a blindfolded horse and led the animal to the top of the bluff over the Cave. By wild shouts and other means the horse was frightened and at the same time forced to the edge of the cliff, and before long the blindfolded animal with the naked man tied on its back ran off the bluff and fell a distance of more than one hundred feet to the rough and rocky shore below." Apparently the other outlaws were unimpressed by this show of brutality and ran the Harpes out of their midst immediately.

Another example of Big Harpe's work comes down from an author named T. Marshall Smith: "Big Harpe snatched it - Susan's infant, about nine months old - from its mother's arms, slung it by the heels against a large tree by the path-side, and literally bursting its head into a dozen pieces, threw it from him as far as his great strength enabled him, into the woods." According to tradition, both Hall and Breazeale both of whom witnessed Big Harpe's death, heard him state that, of all his murders, the only one he regretted was "the killing of his own child."

Click the image to open in full size.
cave-in rock

Click the image to open in full size.


The Outlaws of Cave-in-Rock (Shawnee Classics) 1st Edition( Paperback ) by Rothert, Otto A. published by Southern Illinois University Press: -Default-: Amazon.com: Books
The Outlaws of Cave-in-Rock (Shawnee Classics) 1st Edition( Paperback ) by Rothert, Otto A. published by Southern Illinois University Press: -Default-: Amazon.com: Books

Baltis is offline  
Old December 8th, 2012, 06:46 AM   #24

Baltis's Avatar
Goat Whisperer
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Texas
Posts: 3,113
Blog Entries: 30
Harpe - News Flash


Lexington, KY September 10, 1799 (reprinted in Carolina Gazette Oct, 24, 1799)

"The two murderers by the name of Harps, who killed Mr. Langford last winter in the wilderness, and were arrested and broke the Danville goal, killed a family on Pond river, by the name of Staple on the 22nd day of August and burnt the house; a party of men pursued and overtook them and their women; the Harps parted, Micajah Harp, took two of the women off with him; the men pursued him, and in riding aobut 10 or 12 miles, caught him, having previously shot him. He confessed the killing of Mr. Stump on Big Barren; he also confessed of their killing 17 or 18 besides; they killed two men near Robertson's lick, the day before they burnt Staple's house. They had with them eight horses and a considerable quantity of plunder, seven pair of saddle bags &c. They cut off his head. The women were taken to the Red Banks. The above took place on Pond River in the County of Muhlenburg."


a link to story about the death of Big Harpe.

http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/s...others/12.html
Baltis is offline  
Old December 9th, 2012, 04:10 AM   #25
Suspended indefinitely
 
Joined: Jun 2012
From: USA
Posts: 4,015

Quote:
Originally Posted by Baltis View Post
Lexington, KY September 10, 1799 (reprinted in Carolina Gazette Oct, 24, 1799)

"The two murderers by the name of Harps, who killed Mr. Langford last winter in the wilderness, and were arrested and broke the Danville goal, killed a family on Pond river, by the name of Staple on the 22nd day of August and burnt the house; a party of men pursued and overtook them and their women; the Harps parted, Micajah Harp, took two of the women off with him; the men pursued him, and in riding aobut 10 or 12 miles, caught him, having previously shot him. He confessed the killing of Mr. Stump on Big Barren; he also confessed of their killing 17 or 18 besides; they killed two men near Robertson's lick, the day before they burnt Staple's house. They had with them eight horses and a considerable quantity of plunder, seven pair of saddle bags &c. They cut off his head. The women were taken to the Red Banks. The above took place on Pond River in the County of Muhlenburg."


a link to story about the death of Big Harpe.

America's First Serial Killers — Cornering Big Harpe — Crime Library on truTV.com
It is pretty terrifying to think of a couple of large murderous lunatics roaming the wilderness. I wonder if frontier life attracted more homicidal maniacs or less.
Virgil is offline  
Old December 9th, 2012, 06:57 AM   #26

Baltis's Avatar
Goat Whisperer
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Texas
Posts: 3,113
Blog Entries: 30
Buffalo Soldiers - First Medal of Honor


Sergeant Emanuel Stance of the 9th Cavalry was the first of the Buffalo Soldiers to win the Medal of Honor. Operating out of Fort McKavett, Texas, Sgt Stance led a patrol of 10 men whose mission was to chase a raiding party that hit the local ranches. I am personally delighted with this entry because one of my west Texas ancestors was Joe Thurman. Old Joe is memorialized on a highway marker at Kickapoo Springs in Edwards County as having been the first to settle in the area. Anyway, Sgt. Stances's patrol ran across the raiders at Kickapoo Springs.

From Sgt. Stance's report of May 26, 1870

"I accordingly started about 6 o'clock AM when about two miles from Kickapoo, I discovered a party of Indians about 20 in number, making for a couple of Government teams, which were about three miles in advance of me. They evidently meant to capture the stock as there was only a small guard with the teams. I immediately attacked them by charging them. They tried hard to make a stand to get their herd of horses off, but I set the Spencers to talking and whistling abou their ears so lively that they broke in confusion and fled to the hills, leaving us their herd of five horses. Resuming the march towards camp, they skirmished along my left flank to the eight mile water hole, evidently being determined to take the stock. I turned my little command loose on them at this place, and after a few volleys they left me to continue my march in peace. I reached camp at 2 PM on the 21st with 15 head of horses captured from the Indians.

The casualties of this scout was one horse slightly wounded."

Emanuel Stance, Sergeant, Co. "F", 9th Cavalry


Click the image to open in full size.


Click the image to open in full size.
Baltis is offline  
Old December 12th, 2012, 02:31 PM   #27

Baltis's Avatar
Goat Whisperer
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Texas
Posts: 3,113
Blog Entries: 30
Buffalo Soldiers - Moses Green convicted


Before we get away from Emanuel Stance it might be wise to point out the man could be aggressive and difficult. So Moses Green found out. On August 31, 1883 Stance had a scuffle with Private Davis of 'F' troop. During said scuffle, Stance dropped his pipe on the gound. Another man, Sergeant Hope broke up the fight at which time Stance returned to the barracks spoiling for a fight.

Moses Green was just standing in the barracks when Emanuel Stance walked up to him and asked 'did you kick my pipe?'. Green said 'no' but Stance pressed the issue at which time Green told him 'there was no need to come in startin' a fuss with him (Green).' Becoming enraged, Stance drew his sword and brought it down flat upon Green. "for two cents I'd plunge this sabre through you" Green offered Stance a fist fight but Stance declined claiming "I'll fight with what the government issued me." At that point the two men split with Stance leaving the building.

About a half-hour later, Stance returned to the barracks only to have Green strike him in the head with an oak club studded with large protruding nails. It was, lights out for Emanuel Stance on the first blow but Green gave him a couple extra for good measure. At that point, William Green grabbed Moses and restrained him. Moses Green said that 'Stance can't run him through with a sabre no more'.

Well, naturally Moses Green faced the court martial. Stance didn't die and tried to testify without the first altercation on record but several other witnesses came forward. They also testified that Stance was generally difficult and frequently aggressive in starting fights. In spite of that, the court found Moses guilty on all counts of the indictment. However, at sentencing things didn't really go well for Stance.

"And the court does therefore sentence him, Private Moses Green, Troop "F", 9th Cavalry, to be confined at hard labor, under charge of the guard, at the post where his Troop may be serving for the period of nine months, and to forfeit to the United States ten ($10.00) dollars per month for the same period.

The Court is thus lenient on account of the unreasonable and ill advised conduct of Sergeant Stance toward the prisoner."

R. M. Taylor
Capt. 20th Inf. President


Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.
I confess to not knowing anything about this pic other than it appears to be a 19th century court martial

Last edited by Baltis; December 12th, 2012 at 02:36 PM.
Baltis is offline  
Old December 15th, 2012, 10:54 AM   #28

Baltis's Avatar
Goat Whisperer
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Texas
Posts: 3,113
Blog Entries: 30
Fitzhugh Lee


As the nephew of Lt. Col. Robert E. Lee, Lt. Fitzhugh Lee already had much to live up to. The two were stationed together with the 2nd Cavalry in Central Texas before the Civil War. While leading a small patrol in January 1860, Lt. Lee found himself chasing a Comanche warrior with only his bugler, Jack Hayes.

The two tracked the warrior several miles into a snow covered cedar forest. They came upon an abandoned blanket meant to make them hurry forward in belief the warrior was moving fast. In reality, he was hiding bhind a rock ledge only a few yards off the track. Lt. Lee recognized the ruse and jumped over the ledge to face the warrior who was in the act of cutting loose with an arrow. Lee's rifle butt caught the arrow and the two men crashed together in a fierce embrace. Both men lost their weapons and wrestled to the ground. Lee later described the scene. "Here was I on top, holding down, breast to breast, a live Comanche, and a very slippery one with nothing to kill him." At just that right moment, bugler Hayes arrived and helped hold the Comanche down while Lee grabbed his revolver and shot the Indian twice.

The patrol recovered 25 stolen horses. Fitzhugh Lee took the warrior's weapons and headdress keeping them as a souvenier throughout his life.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.



I got this info from::

Forgotten Fights: Little-known Raids and Skirmishes on the Frontier, 1823 to 1890: Gregory F. Michno, Susan J. Michno, Gwen McKenna: 9780878425495: Amazon.com: Books
Forgotten Fights: Little-known Raids and Skirmishes on the Frontier, 1823 to 1890: Gregory F. Michno, Susan J. Michno, Gwen McKenna: 9780878425495: Amazon.com: Books

Baltis is offline  
Old December 16th, 2012, 05:48 PM   #29

Baltis's Avatar
Goat Whisperer
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Texas
Posts: 3,113
Blog Entries: 30
Black Seminole Scouts


Descended from runaway slaves , the Black Seminoles came from Florida after the Seminole Wars with their friends and relatives in the main tribe. Although often intermarried with the Seminoles, the Black Seminoles maintained a separate identity. In 1849, a number of Creeks, Seminoles, Kickapoo, and most of the Black Seminoles became disgruntled in the Indian territory and moved to Mexico. They spent a number of years working for the Mexican government during which time the Creeks, Seminoles, and some Kickapoo of the group returned to the Indian Territories. By 1860, only the Black Seminoles continued to scout for the Mexicans.


Click the image to open in full size.


By 1870 work with the Mexicans dried up and the Black Seminoles accepted a job offer from the US Army at Fort Duncan, Texas. They began with 17 scouts but quickly proved reliable and the force was expanded to 31. In his 1873 campaigns, Ranald Mackenzie relied extensively on the scouts for direction during his Mexico campaign against the Lipan and remaining Kickapoo. A year later, they scouted for him again in the Red River War.


Click the image to open in full size.


Once the Comanche raids ceased, the Black Seminole Scouts moved close to the border and patrolled the Big Bend region. They chased Apaches under Victorio and Geronimo. There were at least 4 medal of Honor winners among the Black Seminole Scouts.

Click the image to open in full size.


Click the image to open in full size.

I notice this post is number 1,000. Not sure if that is a testament to hard work or too much time on my hands. I also notice it comes almost exactly a year after joining the forum. Thank you friends for a very pleasant experience. Looking forward to the next one.


Oh, almost forgot, this info (and much more ) can be found in:

Buffalo Soldiers in the West: A Black Soldiers Anthology: Bruce A. Glasrud, Michael N. Searles: 9781585446209: Amazon.com: Books
Buffalo Soldiers in the West: A Black Soldiers Anthology: Bruce A. Glasrud, Michael N. Searles: 9781585446209: Amazon.com: Books

Baltis is offline  
Old January 11th, 2013, 06:15 AM   #30

Baltis's Avatar
Goat Whisperer
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Texas
Posts: 3,113
Blog Entries: 30
Sumner raids Canyon de Chelly


In August of 1851 Colonel Sumner led a troop of some 200 men into Navajo territory for the purpose of establishing the first military post in the Arizona territory. He chose a deep canyon with steep sides known as Tsehootsoh (Meadows in the Rocks). The choice would later turn sour as hostile Indians found it relatively easy to rain shot and arrows down at them from the canyon rims. The fort would become known as 'Hell's Gate'.

Click the image to open in full size.

Sumner sent for the Navajo chiefs. When they failed to materialize he grew frustrated and ordered the troops to shoot any Navajos on sight. As a result, "We killed and wounded a number of them, but I cannot say how many. They never faced us, or gave us an opportunity to inflict upon them any signal chastisement."

Col Sumner decided to patrol deep into Navajo country. Specifically, he would lead the men into Canyon de Chelley.

Click the image to open in full size.

During the day, warriors would shadow the column just outside of rifle range. At night, they moved forward and regularly fired into the camp. At least one man was wounded by their random shots. Major Blake of the 1st Dragoons actually had a trench dug inside his tent so he could feel safe enough to sleep.

In order to protect his soldiers as they entered the canyon, Sumner sent a detachment of his dragoons with Major Graham to shadow the column along the south rim. Unfortunately, about 12 miles in, the Navajo started firing from the north rim. They fired guns, arrows, and sent rock avalanches rolling down the canyon sides. Major Thompson and Captain Ewell tried to scale the cliffs to get in range but abandoned the attempt as hopeless. Without finding any significant orchards or fields to destroy, Colonel Sumner reluctantly turned his column around. He commented that it would be, "prudent and proper to leave the canon".

As they tried to march out the next morning, they came upon a peach orchard. It turned out to be a hornet's nest as the 'air suddenly buzzed with musket balls fired from the rimrock and the men were forced to find shelter among rocks, where they remained the rest of the day.'

That night the army saw lights of a 'thousand little fires' on the canyon rim. They could see Indians moving all about. The Colonel called an officer's meeting where it was decided the Navajo were in such numbers that a retreat was called for. The next morning the soldiers very quietly moved down the canyon and out. As a parting shot, several arrows whizzed out at the last minute striking one man and a horse. Sumner's only campaign against the Navajo ended quietly and with tail firmly tucked between the hind legs.

Click the image to open in full size.
Navajo Warriors

Story and quotes from:

Navajo Wars: Military Campaigns, Slave Raids, and Reprisals: Frank McNitt: 9780826312266: Amazon.com: Books
Navajo Wars: Military Campaigns, Slave Raids, and Reprisals: Frank McNitt: 9780826312266: Amazon.com: Books

Baltis is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > American History

Tags
american, tidbits, west


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Shootouts in the American Old West: fact vs. Fiction. Vintersorg American History 12 August 29th, 2012 09:01 AM
Slang Terms in the American West jegates Art and Cultural History 8 November 4th, 2011 07:49 AM
A History of the Early American West - Video ThatFrontierHistorian American History 9 April 22nd, 2011 08:48 AM
Presidential Tidbits n1ck American History 8 March 17th, 2008 10:59 PM
East vs West American Civil War Commander American History 11 August 28th, 2006 03:41 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.