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Old May 16th, 2013, 08:21 AM   #371

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl of Mountain View View Post
I wonder if Buford had an opinion on GAC?
He certainly knew of him. Anybody?
I don't know that they ever even met personally, though both were probably around Pleasonton's HQ at the same time. I can't say what he thought of Custer personally, but his reaction to the sudden promotion of Custer and two other captains straight to the rank of brigadier general is recorded. The day after the promotions went through, Buford's men caught a spy near a town in Maryland; Buford gave him a drumhead court-martial and hanged him on the spot, leaving the body there for three days. When citizens came to protest, he was apparently asked why he didn't send the man to D.C. under guard. Buford sardonically replied that he was afraid if he had sent the man to D.C., they would have made him a brigadier general.

I think it's a reasonably safe assumption that the modest, professional Buford probably would have seen Custer as a flashy showboat though.
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Old May 16th, 2013, 08:30 AM   #372

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Buford sardonically replied that he was afraid if he had sent the man to D.C., they would have made him a brigadier general

Well said Mr. Buford...Now that's funny
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Old May 16th, 2013, 08:42 AM   #373
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Viperlord View Post
I don't know that they ever even met personally, though both were probably around Pleasonton's HQ at the same time. I can't say what he thought of Custer personally, but his reaction to the sudden promotion of Custer and two other captains straight to the rank of brigadier general is recorded. The day after the promotions went through, Buford's men caught a spy near a town in Maryland; Buford gave him a drumhead court-martial and hanged him on the spot, leaving the body there for three days. When citizens came to protest, he was apparently asked why he didn't send the man to D.C. under guard. Buford sardonically replied that he was afraid if he had sent the man to D.C., they would have made him a brigadier general.

I think it's a reasonably safe assumption that the modest, professional Buford probably would have seen Custer as a flashy showboat though.
And I would probably agree with your last Viper. Jno Buford was no man's fool.

Thanks
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Old May 19th, 2013, 01:47 PM   #374
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Custer essentially disobeyed his orders at the Little Big Horn. It is true that he was young, brash and arrogant. However, he had no idean what he was running into. The Lakota and Northern Cheyenne were not just another bunch of "Indians". He ran up against overwhelming odds and the finest light cavalry on the plains. His "last stand" was over in quickly and he did not die as the dime novelists depicted his death. The archaeological artifacts from the site suggest he died relatively early in the fight. There was nothing glorious or brave about his demise. Even if Reno and Benteen had come on as Custer ordered, the result would have been the same, except they and their commands would have been killed as well.
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Old May 21st, 2013, 08:40 AM   #375

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Custer essentially disobeyed his orders at the Little Big Horn.

How did he disobey his orders?
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Old May 21st, 2013, 11:30 AM   #376

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I ran across an article on possible survivors of the Little Big Horn in the current issue of Wild West magazine. (Yes, in small towns of Central Texas the IGA still stocks the good stuff. ) Anyway, there seem to be several different legends for possible survivors.

In one story, a trooper's body was found several miles from the battlefield. At least one witness, Ferdinand Widmayer, identified the man as Nathan Short. He knew that from initials on the man's cartridge belt. Widmayer had this to say: "heard that a dead soldier was found and went to see him. Bones of man and horse and carbine were found. Sling belt still on the skeleton. Says was near the Rosebud. body lay out in an open space near some brush but not in brush. . . . A good many went to see it. . . . Says body had been dead a long time and clothing rotted."

The idea is that Short may have gotten away from the battlefield but died a few days later anyway.

I'm not really certain his story constitutes a 'survivor'.
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Old May 21st, 2013, 11:43 AM   #377

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Originally Posted by Baltis View Post
I ran across an article on possible survivors of the Little Big Horn in the current issue of Wild West magazine. (Yes, in small towns of Central Texas the IGA still stocks the good stuff. ) Anyway, there seem to be several different legends for possible survivors.

In one story, a trooper's body was found several miles from the battlefield. At least one witness, Ferdinand Widmayer, identified the man as Nathan Short. He knew that from initials on the man's cartridge belt. Widmayer had this to say: "heard that a dead soldier was found and went to see him. Bones of man and horse and carbine were found. Sling belt still on the skeleton. Says was near the Rosebud. body lay out in an open space near some brush but not in brush. . . . A good many went to see it. . . . Says body had been dead a long time and clothing rotted."

The idea is that Short may have gotten away from the battlefield but died a few days later anyway.

I'm not really certain his story constitutes a 'survivor'.
Thanks for the info and I agree, that's exactly what I was thinking while I read the post...is he really a survivor then?
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Old May 21st, 2013, 06:06 PM   #378

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Viperlord View Post
I don't know that they ever even met personally, though both were probably around Pleasonton's HQ at the same time. I can't say what he thought of Custer personally, but his reaction to the sudden promotion of Custer and two other captains straight to the rank of brigadier general is recorded. The day after the promotions went through, Buford's men caught a spy near a town in Maryland; Buford gave him a drumhead court-martial and hanged him on the spot, leaving the body there for three days. When citizens came to protest, he was apparently asked why he didn't send the man to D.C. under guard. Buford sardonically replied that he was afraid if he had sent the man to D.C., they would have made him a brigadier general.

I think it's a reasonably safe assumption that the modest, professional Buford probably would have seen Custer as a flashy showboat though.
Seat of the pants, here, but I think a relatively long serving subordinate of Buford... Thomas(?) Devin... Later had a division of cavalry during the end game and served alongside Custer. They seemed to get along rather well. If Devin carried any characteristics learned under Buford that would have clashed with Custer, he kept them under control.
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Old May 21st, 2013, 06:58 PM   #379

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Here is another recent article on Custer's Last Stand. It is not the same one mentioned above about possible survivors. More of that in a following post. But this article is also a Wild West publication.

Custer's Last Stand Still Stands Up

Yo Jegates, take a look at the section on Reno's action and see what you think? The author calls his attack an intended diversion?

Last edited by Baltis; May 21st, 2013 at 07:01 PM.
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Old May 23rd, 2013, 06:20 PM   #380

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And then there was the horse without a rider. Seems there was one horse skeleton "that lay some brush near Rosebud and Yellowstone, and at the time it was supposed that this man has escaped from the Custer fight." Richard Thompson-1864 West Point Grad who retired a full Colonel.

Supposedly several people saw the body. The horse shot in the head. There was a carbine near that was untouched. A testament to the fact no Indian had done it.

Later on, it was said, "by the time Thompson saw the horse, the remains of the man had been buried." Edward Godfrey-later a brigadier General and Medal of Honor winner.

The horse was identified by one man as having belonged to Nathan Short whose body was discussed in the posts above.

Next: Do we have a winner?
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