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Old February 4th, 2014, 06:32 AM   #11

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Originally Posted by Jax Historian View Post
Lincoln always had the problem that while he give general directions, he didn't have enough time to supervise all of the arrests. So he put them (in early 1862) under Stanton in the War Department.
I believe it was Stanton who ordered shutting down of two of New York City newspapers, The New York World and The Journal of Commerce(?). They were owned by a fellow named Marble who was ordered arrested by Stanton. The World was a pro-Democrat paper, overtly racist in it's opposition to abolitionism and emancipation. What caused the flap was the World's printing of a forged presidential order calling for the drafting of an additional 400,000 troops for the Union army. Marble's Journal covered and had close ties with the activities of finance and the stock market. When the story broke, the price of gold rose and insiders alerted ahead of time about the forged proclamation took advantage of the situation, buy gold ahead of the printing and selling at the higher resulting price.
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Old February 4th, 2014, 06:59 AM   #12

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I believe it was Stanton who ordered shutting down of two of New York City newspapers, The New York World and The Journal of Commerce(?). They were owned by a fellow named Marble who was ordered arrested by Stanton. The World was a pro-Democrat paper, overtly racist in it's opposition to abolitionism and emancipation. What caused the flap was the World's printing of a forged presidential order calling for the drafting of an additional 400,000 troops for the Union army. Marble's Journal covered and had close ties with the activities of finance and the stock market. When the story broke, the price of gold rose and insiders alerted ahead of time about the forged proclamation took advantage of the situation, buy gold ahead of the printing and selling at the higher resulting price.
I knew of this case with the trumped-up draft document, but didn't know manipulating gold prices was involved. Interesting!

I can just hear Lincoln telling Stanton: "Don't worry, Edwin, I won't be stepping in on this one. Shut 'em down.
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Old February 4th, 2014, 07:32 AM   #13

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I knew of this case with the trumped-up draft document, but didn't know manipulating gold prices was involved. Interesting!

I can just hear Lincoln telling Stanton: "Don't worry, Edwin, I won't be stepping in on this one. Shut 'em down.
My source on the incident...

The Civil War in 50 Objects: Harold Holzer, New-York Historical Society, Eric Foner: 9780670014637: Amazon.com: Books
The Civil War in 50 Objects: Harold Holzer, New-York Historical Society, Eric Foner: 9780670014637: Amazon.com: Books


A neat little book, the incident is background information for the main topic of the chapter, the World's publishing of "The Miscegenation Ball", and the attempt by it's two reporters who penned it to get Lincoln to endorse the pamphlet, which was made to look like a pro-abolitionist and emancipation creation. It was hoped Lincoln would add his endorsement of it to the signatures of abolitionist who were fooled by it. Had he done so, it would have been used as proof of the World's contention that Lincoln sought to create a mixed-race society, and place whites in positions of servitude to blacks. Abe didn't fall for it. He kept the pamplet sent to him and it was found in his papers and donated to the Historical Society. All this was tied to the election of 1864. Despite their failure to nail Lincoln with it, the ball the pamphlet described was reported by the World as having taken place(it didn't) and that Lincoln approved of it. This, along with several other stories published, played on the racial fears of the citizens of New York City, primarily the Irish immigrants. Lincoln won the election, of course, but he lost in New York City.

Click the image to open in full size.

1864 ?Miscegenation Ball? Anti-Lincoln Cartoon » Sociological Images
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Old February 4th, 2014, 08:35 AM   #14
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Seems like ample justification to shut down the newspaper. I guess they didn't show black men with white women, in order to be more believable.
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Old February 4th, 2014, 10:13 AM   #15

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Seems like ample justification to shut down the newspaper. I guess they didn't show black men with white women, in order to be more believable.
I may have confused you a bit. The paper was shut down and the owner/editor jailed for the forged presidential proclamation and insider profiting thereof. Seward had given the orders to do so. Three days later Lincoln ordered Marble released and his two publications reopened. The Miscegenation Ball came afterward. So much for gratitude, eh? Btw, there was no action taken against Marble or the paper by the administration for that one.

Something I noticed in the illustration of the alleged ball. Look at the man on the left side of it back near the entrance to the hall. Look familiar?

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Old February 4th, 2014, 10:49 AM   #16

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He left out the fact that Congress approved the suspension of habeas corpus, as well as the fact that the Confederacy did it as well. The figure of 300 newspapers sounds high, but I don't have anything immediately to hand to double-check that with. The number of prisoners is probably in the right; I'm guessing that again DiLorenzo left out the fact that the Confederacy imprisoned thousands of political prisoners as well however...

Southern Rights: Political Prisoners and the Myth of Confederate Constitutionalism: Mark E. Neely Jr.: 9780813918945: Amazon.com: Books

The Confederacy also waged an active and brutal war against dissidents in certain areas, particularly in response to the Unionism of East Tennessee. EASTERN TENNESSEE. - THE UNION MOVEMENT DECLARATION OF GRIEVANCES ADOPTED BY THE CONVENTION. DECLARATION ON GRIEVANCES. RESOLUTIONS. - NYTimes.com

You were an especially unlucky Unionist if you ended up in Champ Ferguson's sights.

Champ Ferguson: An American Civil War Rebel Guerrilla

Jefferson Davis? care to explain?
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Old February 4th, 2014, 11:32 AM   #17

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Three days later Lincoln ordered Marble released and his two publications reopened.
Three days??? Some dictator. He sounds more like a wuss to me.
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Old February 4th, 2014, 11:41 AM   #18
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Three days??? Some dictator. He sounds more like a wuss to me.
Well, that raises an interesting question. Were those 300 or whatever newspapers shut down permanently or for a few days? Definitely relevant to whether he was a dictator.
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Old February 4th, 2014, 12:27 PM   #19

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Well, that raises an interesting question. Were those 300 or whatever newspapers shut down permanently or for a few days? Definitely relevant to whether he was a dictator.
It appears that what we have here is a classic case of, "If you want all the glory, you have to take all the criticism." Meaning Lincoln is responsible to history for the actions taken during his administration. From what I can gather, most of the papers shut down were done in the earliest stages of the war. An awful lot of them by "extrajudicial action" by enraged citizens and some by outright thugs in the border states. Most of these simply chose not to reestablish their papers in that particular community or area. Some closed down by martial decree of military officers, but many of these were ordered reopened by higher authority, sometimes Lincoln himself. Of course we have the actions by the more famous figures such as Burnside, Stanton, Sherman and Dix that are, by the very nature of their origin, more readily documented and commented upon. It certainly looks to me that if there were indeed 300 papers shutdown, an intellectually dishonest element hangs them all on Lincoln as since they were done on his watch he must have had direct involvement in all of them.
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Old February 4th, 2014, 12:40 PM   #20

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Well, that raises an interesting question. Were those 300 or whatever newspapers shut down permanently or for a few days? Definitely relevant to whether he was a dictator.
That's a real good question and, from what I've looked at, we'll never know for sure (I've looked hard for a list of all the papers that were shut down/suspended and the corresponding dates, I don't think one can be compiled on the evidence that exists). So. I'll speak to a few cases I do know about.

First, the information that Viperlord posted about Oregon papers being shut down, I didn't know about. That article named a couple and claimed their were a couple more. Mostly what struck me about the article is what seems to be a simple truth; given the way newspapers operated in that era, even a temporary shutdown spelled financial ruin for small papers, so undoubtedly whether the sentence was long or short, restricting small papers from using the mail was a death sentence for them.

What we do have evidence about is larger papers or certain editors who made the news of the time. If a big anti-Lincoln paper was shutdown, it was commented on - even often in the Republican papers (this kept Lincoln ever watchful that he wasn't losing his own constituency). I already mentioned the Wilbur Story/Chicago paper 2 day shutdown (I believe even Republican Horace Greeley spoke up on that one;I know he did on the Vallandigham conviction). Then we have the New York World case mentioned above.

Getting to longer suspensions, I know that Dennis Mahoney, editor of the Dubuque (Iowa) Herald. I'm not sure what he wrote, but Lincoln let him sit in jail at least a month demanding an apology and that he not say, whatever it was, again. Finally, Mahoney apologized and was released. He then penned a small book, Prisoner of State, which Lincoln head to toe for his arrest. But Lincoln never arrested him again.

Here's a clip from Mahoney's book (the whole book is an free online ebook):

Quote:
Instead of the Constitutional Government instituted by the State and People, power has been usurped and exercised by the Administration to restrain freedom of speech and of the press, to incarcerate freemen for exercising their rights, and for performing their duty as American citizens, and to perpetuate the rule of fanatic partisanship over our once free, happy, and prosperous land. And, strange to say, the people bear it all, submit to it all, hold out their arms to be manacled by the tyrants in power… [1]
[1] D.A. Mahony, [1863] Prisoner of State: The Journal of a Victim of the Lincoln Regime (New York: Carlton: 1863), 230. Accessible online athttp://www.archive.org/details/prisonerstate00mahorich, accessed April 8, 2011.

There are a couple other cases I could mention, but I've never found any evidence that any newspaper publisher was held for any length of time over a couple months. One thing that should be understood is that military arrests of this type happened, generally in two periods. The first was in 1861 when Lincoln's actions targeted Maryland (which) Lincoln was determined to keep in the Union to protect D.C., and in New York city where some papers were advocating that even New York seceded. In early 1862, Lincoln freed all political prisoners accept those he believed to be actual spies and saboteurs.

But that wasn't the end of it; state conscription in '62 and (far more so) Emancipation and the Federal Draft in '63 heated it up all over again. It appears that Ambrose arrested Vallandigham based on what he said about Lincoln and Emancipation. But that wasn't Lincoln's main concern. As I said earlier, Lincoln was concerned with the draft; he saw it as law vital to the Union War effort, and he took out newspapers (at least temporarily) he thought encouraged draft resistance.

I've never found an editor who was jailed for more than a few months, but that doesn't mean it didn't happen. But I think its strange that there doesn't seem to evidence of such given that we know about newspaper closures being pretty big news at the time.
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