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-   -   Should the US have joined ww1? (http://historum.com/american-history/68641-should-us-have-joined-ww1.html)

Meniken February 28th, 2014 10:22 AM

Should the US have joined ww1?
 
Hello there, since my thread here did not seem to attract a lot of attention I am gonna try here by creating a debate, if that is alright.

Should the United States of America have joined the first world war on the side of the entente, or should it have stayed passive?

KGB February 28th, 2014 10:43 AM

It was impossible not to join... USA was doomed to join and to win the war. The problem is that US hasn`t done what was needed after the war ...

Meniken February 28th, 2014 10:48 AM

Could you please be more specific?
I mean, they decided to join the war because of the German attack on RMS Lusitania, but they did a long time after.
So clearly they had some issues with joining the war.
They were not directly involved in the war, as far as I know. What forced them to join the war, other than helping out their friends?

General Mosh February 28th, 2014 10:59 AM

The US cannot afford to be an isolationist nation and alienate everybody. We had to have some sort of involvement in the war, and it was kind of inevitable due to the nature of our history and culture that we'd side with the Entente.

Underlankers February 28th, 2014 11:04 AM

The Kaiser's Navy wanted policies that would have brought the USA into the war in 1915, and finally got them implemented in 1916. Whether or not the USA should have joined is immaterial, the Germans would have strongarmed them regardless.

Meniken February 28th, 2014 11:49 AM

Lusitania was attacked 1915, the US joined the war 1917, so that's hardly a justification.
The Lusitania had weapons for the British on board so the attack was somewhat reasonable.
President Wilson tried to keep the US neutral.
As far as I understand the main reason was Germany's submarine war on all ships that approached Britain, as well as the Zimmermann telegram, so it was Germany's provocation that led them into war, rather than the choice to support the Triple Entente.
Why do you think that US culture made it inevitable to side with the Entente? There were many German Americans, and Prussian soldiers supported America during their war for independence, so I'd say neutrality was the default position for them.

aerial gunner February 28th, 2014 12:44 PM

The war was inevitable after Germany's Sussex Pledge and constant violations. Their unrestricted submarine warfare, the Zimmerman Telegram (whether it was legitimate or not), and the assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand in 1914, just remedied the the war.

Emperor Trajan February 28th, 2014 03:07 PM

Yes the US needed to join World War 1. Germany was violating to Sussex Pledge.

betgo February 28th, 2014 03:25 PM

The US entry followed right after 2 events. One was the Zimmermann admitting the Zimmermann telegram was genuine. Many people believed it was a British forgery, and in any case its release was a British attempt to manipulate the US.

The other was the first Russian Revolution. I think the US may have been reluctant to join on the side of the Czars. Also, there was probably fear that the provisional government would be overthrown by monarchists or radicals or that Russia would be defeated by the Central Powers.

So I would think those events, combined with British manipulations and perceived US interest in preventing the Entente from being defeated and playing a role in deciding the war, were the main reasons.

I don't think it is at all certain that the US joins the war. I think the Central Powers really lost the war diplomatically. I don't think it was at all obvious that either Italy or the US would join the Entente.

aerial gunner February 28th, 2014 04:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by betgo (Post 1737931)
The US entry followed right after 2 events. One was the Zimmermann admitting the Zimmermann telegram was genuine. Many people believed it was a British forgery, and in any case its release was a British attempt to manipulate the US.

The Zimmerman telegram was intercepted by the British, and Arthur Zimmerman never admitted to the telegram being "genuine" or a "British forgery". Please give a link or two for your statement with credible sources. As well, it's not true that many believed it was forgery, only a minority of historians did, and they have still to this day, not found any evidence to support that claim.


Quote:

Originally Posted by betgo (Post 1737931)
The other was the first Russian Revolution. I think the US may have been reluctant to join on the side of the Czars. Also, there was probably fear that the provisional government would be overthrown by monarchists or radicals or that Russia would be defeated by the Central Powers.

The Russian Revolution had little to no impact on the United States' decision to join the war.
Quote:

Originally Posted by history.state.gov
On April 2, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson went before a joint session of Congress to request a declaration of war against Germany. Wilson cited Germany’s violation of its pledge to suspend unrestricted submarine warfare in the North Atlantic and the Mediterranean, and its attempts to entice Mexico into an alliance against the United States, as his reasons for declaring war. On April 4, 1917, the U.S. Senate voted in support of the measure to declare war on Germany. The House concurred two days later. The United States later declared war on Austria-Hungary on December 7, 1917.


Quote:

Originally Posted by betgo (Post 1737931)
So I would think those events, combined with British manipulations and perceived US interest in preventing the Entente from being defeated and playing a role in deciding the war, were the main reasons.

There is no solid evidence to support the idea that Britain forged the Zimmerman Note, and the U.S. was more particularly concerned with its own safety. since the major policy that was supported during the beginning of the war was complete isolationism.


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