Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > American History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

American History American History Forum - United States, Canada, Mexico, Central and South America


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old April 17th, 2014, 10:13 PM   #1
Historian
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 4,861
New Sweden


What was the influence of New Sweden? Are there still elements of Swedish/Finnish culture in that area? I understand they brought the log cabin.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.

Last edited by betgo; April 17th, 2014 at 10:22 PM.
betgo is offline  
Remove Ads
Old April 17th, 2014, 10:29 PM   #2
Historian
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,005

Log cabins.

http://www.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlps/le...ns/4facts1.htm

EDIT: According to some things i have read it was actually claimed that Swedes (and Finns) fared the best (of the colonists) with the local indigenous population. At times even 'going native'. Catch was that the culture and style of living of the local Indians wasn't actually that far off how the poor folk had used to living in Sweden.

http://people.virginia.edu/~mgf2j/finns.html

Last edited by Vaeltaja; April 17th, 2014 at 10:48 PM.
Vaeltaja is offline  
Old April 17th, 2014, 10:44 PM   #3

Vikingr's Avatar
Lecturer
 
Joined: Apr 2014
From: Canada
Posts: 466

Quote:
Traces of New Sweden persist in the lower Delaware Valley to this day, including Holy Trinity Church in Wilmington, Gloria Dei Church in Philadelphia, and Trinity Episcopal Church in Swedesboro, New Jersey, all commonly known as "Old Swedes' Church".[19] Christiana, Delaware, is one of the few settlements in the area with a Swedish name. Swedesford Road is still found in Chester and Montgomery Counties, Pennsylvania, although Swedesford has long since become Norristown. The American Swedish Historical Museum, located in FDR Park in South Philadelphia, houses many exhibits, documents and artifacts from the New Sweden colony.
[ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Sweden]New Sweden - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]



The Finns Hack and Slash agriculture method was picked up by the nearby Natives.

Last edited by Vikingr; April 17th, 2014 at 10:47 PM.
Vikingr is offline  
Old April 18th, 2014, 06:59 AM   #4

Mike Lynch's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Aug 2012
From: Colorado
Posts: 1,733

No, there is nothing Swedish about the area, unless you are specifically going to a museum. Believe me, I've been in the area countless times and kept my eyes peeled. There aren't even Swedish place names, with the exception of a small handful. I wish I could say otherwise.

I've also tried to research when Swedish stopped being spoken in the area and haven't been able to pinpoint a date or decade. The Swedish settlers were small in number and often ran away to nearby Dutch holdings and English Maryland, so it is not difficult to imagine that Swedish ceased to be spoken within a generation or two or conquest.
Mike Lynch is offline  
Old April 18th, 2014, 07:33 AM   #5

skizzerflake's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Mar 2010
From: Baltimore, Maryland
Posts: 2,141

I live not too far from the old New Sweden area, have always been curious, but find nothing except historical references to anything Swedish, in fact, when I have asked, people seemed almost blank on Swedes in the colonial period. Whatever cultural influence there may have been has been absorbed into mainstream eastern US. I've been curious about it because my paternal ancestry was all Swedish, but they arrived in the late 19th and early 20th century and were pushed out to Minnesota. That upper mid-west + Swedish (think Lake Wobegon or Fargo) accent that is or was so common in small towns and Minneapolis was part of my growing-up memory but none of them had any connection the Delaware River valley at all, in spite of a couple town names that suggested Sweden.
skizzerflake is offline  
Old April 18th, 2014, 08:05 AM   #6

skizzerflake's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Mar 2010
From: Baltimore, Maryland
Posts: 2,141

On the log houses, I have a lot of them (or at least as many as you can have of something that's at least 200 years old, about a dozen, carefully preserved as private homes) on the road I live on in Baltimore and they are said to be of German origin. As a building type, I don't think they are uniquely Swedish. There were a lot more Germans in this area, including New Sweden, that arrived after the early Swedes, do have lots of place names and contemporary descendants and account for most of the log buildings in the area.
skizzerflake is offline  
Old April 18th, 2014, 09:05 AM   #7
Historian
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 4,100

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Lynch View Post
No, there is nothing Swedish about the area, unless you are specifically going to a museum. Believe me, I've been in the area countless times and kept my eyes peeled. There aren't even Swedish place names, with the exception of a small handful. I wish I could say otherwise.

I've also tried to research when Swedish stopped being spoken in the area and haven't been able to pinpoint a date or decade. The Swedish settlers were small in number and often ran away to nearby Dutch holdings and English Maryland, so it is not difficult to imagine that Swedish ceased to be spoken within a generation or two or conquest.
On the contrary, the colonists remained in the area. It's rather that the Quakers, when they turned up a couple of decades after Sweden had ceded the colony to the Dutch, complained that they had trouble telling the colonists apart from the natives.

The thing that really kept those two groups apart however, was that the former colonists and their descendants continued to be members of the Church of Sweden all the way up to 1783, and at least some of the old folk still spoke Swedish up until around 1800. It was an official parish, and some young priest was regularly sent out from the Archdiocese in Uppsala. (Once read a fascinating report from one of these, having had a religious debate with some of the natives in the region, at a settlement called Connestooga.)

But probably the only remnant of Swedishness in the region today are a bunch of churches. Wilmington is apparently the place where there might be most New Sweden memorbilia around. But likely you're still going to have to hunt around for it, or know in advance where to look.

Generally, the Swedish colonists can probably be regarded from about the same colonial distance as the native Americans in the regions. The "Susquehanna" (Minqas etc.) even formally allied themselves with the Swedes, and declared a "protectorate", with themselves as the protectors of the Swedes.

I've also read an even more fascinating MS by a fortifications officer, who took part in the final defense of the colony, against the Dutch under Stuyvsant in 1653. The man is clearly two minds about the natives, who are on the one hadn devil worshippers, but the most loyal allies he's even come across — who pratice ritual torture and studied cruelty against captive Englishmen in one sentance, and in the next he turns the "cruel savages" narrative on the head, detailing the alleged crimes of the Englishmen, meaning that opposite to expectation, the natives are practicing just retribution — since ritual torture was what people did in Europe as well. Etc.

Last edited by Larrey; April 18th, 2014 at 09:11 AM.
Larrey is offline  
Old April 18th, 2014, 09:12 AM   #8

Mike Lynch's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Aug 2012
From: Colorado
Posts: 1,733

Quote:
Originally Posted by Larrey View Post
On the contrary, the colonists remained in the area. It's rather that the Quakers, when they turned up a couple of decades after Sweden had ceded the colony to the Dutch, complained that they had trouble telling the colonists apart from the natives.

The thing that really kept those two groups apart however, was that the former colonists and their descendants continued to be members of the Church of Sweden all the way up to 1783, and at least some of the old folk still spoke Swedish up until around 1800. It was an official parish, and some young priest was regularly sent out from the Archdiocese in Uppsala. (Once read a fascinating report from one of these, having had a religious debate with some of the natives in the region, at a settlement called Connestooga.)

But probably the only remnant of Swedishness in the region today are a bunch of churches. Wilmington is apparently the place where there might be most New Sweden memorbilia around. But likely you're still going to have to hunt around for it, or know in advance where to look.
Great stuff. I've been trying to figure out what happened to the Swedes for some time. Thanks for the information.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Larrey View Post
But likely you're still going to have to hunt around for it, or know in advance where to look.
Definitely. I live near Delaware and have been up and down the state countless times and have never come across anything concerning New Sweden. Like Sizzlerflake said, if you mention New Sweden people like at you like you are talking about UFO's!
Mike Lynch is offline  
Old April 18th, 2014, 10:30 AM   #9
Historian
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 4,861

There seem to be many Swedish place names in southern NJ, like those ending in "boro" Are there Swedish or Finnish surnames in "New Sweden"?
betgo is offline  
Old April 18th, 2014, 03:39 PM   #10

Speculatin''s Avatar
Scholar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
From: evergreen state, USA
Posts: 917

As far as I can tell after putting my family tree together over the last few years, on my maternal side I connect to New Sweden in 3 different threads. Two are at Fort Christina (Wilmington,Delaware). I'd have to check the third origin. Anyway, they mixed in with English (& Welsh?) and early Dutch, and moved to other parts of the country over generations. I also have an unrelated thread with Welsh. And then there is my direct maternal line (U5b2b2) that goes back to England.

Last edited by Speculatin'; April 18th, 2014 at 03:47 PM.
Speculatin' is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > American History

Tags
sweden



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hello from sweden fredrikslicer New Users 19 September 5th, 2013 12:24 PM
Hello from Sweden! cbs New Users 17 November 19th, 2012 12:31 PM
Hello from Sweden! Cornelius New Users 36 May 31st, 2011 06:26 AM
Greetings from Sweden! Arvenides New Users 22 August 11th, 2010 01:19 PM
Greetings from Sweden Karlsson New Users 13 November 20th, 2009 02:26 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.