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Old June 6th, 2014, 03:29 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by BoilerL1 View Post
At one of my trade union conventions out in Vegas our Chicago delegation was seated near the guys from Vancouver B.C. and we chatted quite a bit. One of the Canadians chided me like a finger wagging old schoolmarm when I referred to myself as an American, so I told him to go **** himself. That was that.
Nice, I think that pretty much sums up the whole issue. We call ourselves what we call ourselves and who cares what anyone else thinks.
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Old June 6th, 2014, 03:59 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by RoryOMore View Post
You can also say that saying "Yo Yo Ma" is bad manners, because it is offensive. To who? To a reasonable person?

Americans began calling themselves Americans because they came to believe they were different than the English, French, and Spanish people around them. No one else on this territory though of themselves as Americans, including the tribal peoples who didn't know what "the Americas" were. So you'd think the term "Americans" would have been up for grabs then.

There's an absolutely perfect analogy to this situation: "English." In America, you occasionally hear someone say, "I don't talk English, I talk American!" It's not a position that taken by educated people, though.
Not long ago a married woman was proud to be called Mrs. Smith, or whatever her last name was, and we accepted being treated as though we really did not have an important role in society, besides as wives and mothers who existed under the care of men. Our husband's determine our social status, not our own activity. Things change with time, and what was once taken for granted, can be very offensive in the present. As a woman, I can relate to people in south America objecting to terminology that fails to acknowledge their existence.
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Old June 6th, 2014, 04:05 PM   #43
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Nice, I think that pretty much sums up the whole issue. We call ourselves what we call ourselves and who cares what anyone else thinks.
I hope you are being sarcastic and not inconsiderate and disrespectful.
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Old June 6th, 2014, 04:14 PM   #44
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Also,isn't this more appropriate for The Lounge? What does it have to do with history?
RoryOMore gave a good explanation of why the people of the US call themselves Americans. We do not live in the past, and change may be appropriate. A smooth transition needs to begin with an understanding of the past, and the present, and an idea of a better future.
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Old June 6th, 2014, 04:20 PM   #45

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I am delighted to say introduce myself as an American and have never been misunderstood when doing so. I think the term is commonly accepted about the globe as a reference to those of us from the USA.

Now, no wish to be offensive. I understand about the continent thing. However, I wonder how many Brazilians, Chileans, or Columbians can go to Europe and identify themselves as Americans with confidence they communicated correctly to their listener?
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Old June 6th, 2014, 04:47 PM   #46

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My mother is Swedish and my father is Chinese. That’s why my name is Erik Han.
I live in Mexico.
So I am Erik Han and live in America, then I am American. But I still am Erik Han. So am I American twice, without being American?
If you live in Mexico you're a Mexican. Simple enough.

Last edited by BoilerL1; June 6th, 2014 at 05:05 PM.
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Old June 6th, 2014, 04:53 PM   #47

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I was in Indiana twice. Both times some guy yelled "Gentlemen, start your engines." I understood it quite clearly.
Imported talent.
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But I was in Boston a few times. When someone told me to "Pak here." I asked "what the hell does that mean?" Apparently it means "Park here."

I hate being outside of the U.S. It's so confusing.
I was in 72 countries at least overnight when I was in the Navy, and passed through a few more. I loved traveling.
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Old June 6th, 2014, 04:59 PM   #48

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Originally Posted by athena View Post
As a woman, I can relate to people in south America objecting to terminology that fails to acknowledge their existence.
Fails to acknowledge their existence? Hardly. Just fails to recognize them as being of The United States. And they aren't.
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Old June 6th, 2014, 05:02 PM   #49

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As a woman, I can relate to people in south America objecting to terminology that fails to acknowledge their existence.
Anyone who complains about Americans calling themselves Americans however, is 1) attempting to manufacture outrage, and 2) unfamiliar with the history of the continent. The citizens of the United States are called Americans because originally they were the citizens of the only independent nation on the continent. The United States of America was named as such because everywhere else in the Americas was claimed by Europe. Outside of the United States, other than the Native Americans, everyone was either a Brit, or a Frenchman, a Spaniard, a Dutchman, or a Portuguese.

And why does no one complain about citizens of the Republic of Colombia calling themselves Columbians? Colombia (or Columbia) also originally referred to the entire 'New World,' just as America, or the Americas did.

Last edited by Scaeva; June 6th, 2014 at 05:06 PM.
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Old June 6th, 2014, 05:39 PM   #50
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And why does no one complain about citizens of the Republic of Colombia calling themselves Columbians? Colombia (or Columbia) also originally referred to the entire 'New World,' just as America, or the Americas did.
Just as an aside, I'm pretty dubious of the conversation as reported in the link. Anyone remotely familiar with Washington would assume "Columbia" meant nearby Columbia, Maryland, and not Columbia, South Carolina.

Last edited by RoryOMore; June 6th, 2014 at 07:30 PM.
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