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View Poll Results: what is your favorite 'culture area'?
Northeast 7 14.58%
Southeast 2 4.17%
Great Plains 12 25.00%
Southwest 13 27.08%
Great Basin 0 0%
California 1 2.08%
Plateau 1 2.08%
Northwest Coast 9 18.75%
Subartic 0 0%
Artic 3 6.25%
Voters: 48. You may not vote on this poll

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Old October 18th, 2014, 11:56 PM   #21

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Originally Posted by Edgewaters View Post
Oh I'd say there's quite a few other bits of material culture inhabiting the stereotype: canoes, tomahawks, tasseled leather jackets and moccasins, beadwork, feather headdresses, teepees and wigwams and longhouses, Haida-style artwork (up here in Canada anyway, where the stuff is ubiquitous), dreamcatchers, etc
I thought longhouses tomahawks were northeastern woodlands, the tasseled buckskin and feathered headdresses and teepees were great plains, etc.

Northwest coast houses were typically made of cedar planks with peaked roofs, quite similar to European carpentry except for lack of metal nails. Indeed I'm surprised that they still made dugout canoes rather than plank-built watercraft.
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Old October 24th, 2014, 12:58 PM   #22

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Just found a tribe that was around the area where I grew up: Meskwaki, which are the Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa. I remember the name Meskawki from living out there decades ago, but I didn't know that it was an officially designated band of the Sac and Fox (one of three official bands of Sac and Fox according to the Sac and Fox Nation of Missouri website I am looking at currently).

I guess the Mississippian tribes are the ones I am most interested in, just because of that connection I have to the area (well, I am familiar with the Mississippi from Minnesota down into Missouri at least). I wouldn't pass on the opportunity to learn about any of them, same goes with any tribe of people around the globe (people and cultures are interesting I think), but I would really like to get off my duff and learn more about those from my old stomping grounds.
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Old October 25th, 2014, 11:24 AM   #23

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I don't think I can reasonably vote. In California, part of the history classes dwelt on the "mission Indians", yet we also covered the NW Indians and the potlatch culture, the Navaho, Hopi and anasazi cultures, the Commanche and Apache and finally, a sort of generic "East Coast" Indians -- usually identified as Iroquois. All of these peoples were as different as the Vikings were to the Romans or the English and the French and with so much of their culture unrecorded and therefore only available via archaeology, it's hard to say if one is really accurate in knowledge, any more than we are regarding what the Helvetii, Arverni and Sequani were like -- or how they differed. I suppose I like the Navaho most for their pueblos and pottery, the NW for their fishing and wood work, admire the whale hunters of the Arctic for their courage, and Apache and Comanche for their ferocity and warriors.
South of the border, I can acknowledge the various cultures there for their organization and building while being quite dismayed about their rather blood thirsty religions.
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Old October 25th, 2014, 01:32 PM   #24

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I don't think I can reasonably vote. In California, part of the history classes dwelt on the "mission Indians", yet we also covered the NW Indians and the potlatch culture, the Navaho, Hopi and anasazi cultures, the Commanche and Apache and finally, a sort of generic "East Coast" Indians -- usually identified as Iroquois. All of these peoples were as different as the Vikings were to the Romans or the English and the French and with so much of their culture unrecorded and therefore only available via archaeology, it's hard to say if one is really accurate in knowledge, any more than we are regarding what the Helvetii, Arverni and Sequani were like -- or how they differed. I suppose I like the Navaho most for their pueblos and pottery, the NW for their fishing and wood work, admire the whale hunters of the Arctic for their courage, and Apache and Comanche for their ferocity and warriors.
South of the border, I can acknowledge the various cultures there for their organization and building while being quite dismayed about their rather blood thirsty religions.
I agree with a lot of what you said. I find it ridiculous to pick a "favorite" to be honest, like picking a favorite people/culture/country/language/whatever from anywhere else on the planet. I would be happy to learn more about them all, but I do find a certain connection to the tribes that lived on the same river banks and wooded areas that I grew up around.

I have some love for the Iroquois nations as well, do to our family connection, but even that doesn't beat my feelings to the people who lived loving the same land that I did (and still do).

I remember helping quiz my dad on the various time periods, and tribes and nations at those times. He went back to school in his 30s and got his BA in archeology and anthropology, so I had an opportunity to see a lot of the stuff he was studying. He also went on a lot of digs across the state looking at prehistoric native campsites, finding discard piles from where they fashioned their stone weapons. Sometimes they even found full points, and my dad had found the oldest and largest that had been discovered in the state at that time (early 1990s). He loved it. He also went to AIM meetings in surrounding areas, and participated in researching for a fight against developers in our town who were trying to put up expensive houses (built super cheap, with inferior supplies of course) in an area that had been a burial ground.
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Old October 25th, 2014, 03:33 PM   #25

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Originally Posted by Zhang LaoYong View Post
I agree with a lot of what you said. I find it ridiculous to pick a "favorite" to be honest, like picking a favorite people/culture/country/language/whatever from anywhere else on the planet.
If it gets us talking about the subject at hand, then it suits its purpose within the context of the forum.
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Old October 25th, 2014, 04:56 PM   #26

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If it gets us talking about the subject at hand, then it suits its purpose within the context of the forum.
Sorry, I didn't mean that in a negative way. I really meant that for me it is ridiculous to try and nail down 1 over the others. There is just so much I don't know about all of them still. I have had very little opportunity to take intensive classes on Native cultures at the few colleges and the university I have attended. The best class I had was the undergrad archaeology class on the history of Meso-American civilizations up to the Spanish arrival.

In fact, I was just on the phone talking with my dad about his time studying the various tribes, and his digs at prehistoric camp sites looking for discarded flakes or the occasional point. When he retires, he wants to go back to working for the state archaeology office, working at the sites as a shovel man.

I have been lucky to run into a few Native vets at the VFW and Legion posts around town. One is a WWII pilot who flew in the European theater. Typically, we don't talk about the tribe or their business, unless something happens. Some of the guys in this past year have been rallying behind the hopeful name change of the Washington team name in the NFL.

Getting off topic, sorry. Anyway, I would be very excited to see more threads on this site dedicated to informing those of us who like myself, really want to learn more on as many cultures as possible here. I used to see a lot about the tribes that used to live in my old homeland (those tribes were later moved to Missouri, Kansas and Nebraska) along the Mississippi around the Quad Cities. I used to hear about Chief Blackhawk and the war he fought, leading to the settlement of the area I was born at. It was so long ago, I don't remember much if anything any more. It would be nice to bone up on all that history. That is why I say that they are my "favorite" in a way, but by no means does that mean I wouldn't be thrilled to read about all the other fascinating things from other cultures that the previous poster had mentioned.

Again, I wasn't trying to be rude, and apologize if it came out that way. Unfortunately, I don't see a way to go back and edit old posts (like on other sites where that option is always available).
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Old October 25th, 2014, 06:58 PM   #27

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Did the Comanche extend out into the Great Plains area? I thought they were just down here in the Southwest and West Texas? I am no expert, just asking.
Geographically speaking, the "Great Plains" in the US includes the entire states of North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma along with parts of Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, and Texas.

The Comanche ruled over the southern most part of the Great Planes in the Texas Panhandle and Oklahoma.
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Old October 26th, 2014, 06:03 PM   #28

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It seems to me that wherever we are from, it will be the more powerful of the indigenous tribes that have had the most powerful influence on our views. For instance, the Comanches have left an indelible mark on the soul of my beloved Texas state. Of all the Plains Indians, no other tribes had ever given such trouble to the powerful States and great empires of the time: Spain, France, Mexico, The Republic of Texas, The Confederacy and finally the US.
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Old October 27th, 2014, 07:19 AM   #29

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Originally Posted by Panthera tigris altaica View Post
It seems to me that wherever we are from, it will be the more powerful of the indigenous tribes that have had the most powerful influence on our views. For instance, the Comanches have left an indelible mark on the soul of my beloved Texas state. Of all the Plains Indians, no other tribes had ever given such trouble to the powerful States and great empires of the time: Spain, France, Mexico, The Republic of Texas, The Confederacy and finally the US.
sure. One remembers the Scots or the Vandals, not so much the Aduatuci. People are more likely to remember Vercingetorix than Dumnorix (spelled Dubnoreix on coins).
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Old October 27th, 2014, 10:07 AM   #30

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I voted Northwest Coast since I now live here. This region had abundant natural resources for pre-Columbian (before "white man") Native Americans. When I lived in Wisconsin in my youth, I liked the Great Lakes "Indians" best. Then later, when we moved down to Florida, I was interested in Seminoles and earlier tribes.
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