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View Poll Results: what is your favorite 'culture area'?
Northeast 9 16.67%
Southeast 4 7.41%
Great Plains 14 25.93%
Southwest 13 24.07%
Great Basin 0 0%
California 1 1.85%
Plateau 1 1.85%
Northwest Coast 9 16.67%
Subartic 0 0%
Artic 3 5.56%
Voters: 54. You may not vote on this poll

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Old October 27th, 2014, 09:18 AM   #31

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Panthera tigris altaica View Post
It seems to me that wherever we are from, it will be the more powerful of the indigenous tribes that have had the most powerful influence on our views. For instance, the Comanches have left an indelible mark on the soul of my beloved Texas state. Of all the Plains Indians, no other tribes had ever given such trouble to the powerful States and great empires of the time: Spain, France, Mexico, The Republic of Texas, The Confederacy and finally the US.
When I was taking a class on the early history of "Texas" (obviously this was before this area was a state, and only as the Spanish were making contact with the natives here), I was told that the Comanche had been a tribe that was kicked around a lot by the other tribes in the area. That was until they got introduced to the horse -- and then they became a very ferocious force in battle.

Also, weren't the Texas Rangers started to protect ranchers, farmers, settlers, and the towns of Texas west of where I-35 now is from the Comanche? I am not a native Texan, and may not be remembering that part of the history correctly. I have seen those signs for the Texas Ranger museum -- the first time I saw them I thought it was strange that the Rangers would have a museum so far from The Ball Park up in Arlington! That isn't a joke. I really thought it was for the baseball team when I first saw the signs, but the distance made me reconsider. . .
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Old October 27th, 2014, 11:57 PM   #32

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Originally Posted by Zhang LaoYong View Post
When I was taking a class on the early history of "Texas" (obviously this was before this area was a state, and only as the Spanish were making contact with the natives here), I was told that the Comanche had been a tribe that was kicked around a lot by the other tribes in the area. That was until they got introduced to the horse -- and then they became a very ferocious force in battle.
Well, not in the Texas area. The short of it: They were originally a smallish group within the Shoshone tribe and were of no consequence by the end of the 15th century. Originally hailing from up north near the Canadian border, in the now current US state of Wyoming. as you noted, that is until the horse came along, which they first used as a source to feed themselves by hunting and of migration to the south by following the buffalo herds... then once the horse had become central to their culture and existence some where between the 1725 and 1750's, they came barreling south out from Colorado and Kansas area like a steam roller by sweeping all tribes before them, even the once feared Apaches were no match for them.

The Spanish, then the Mexicans had a hard time handling them and that wasn't because their military was weak, but because the distances involved in the area that was the Comancheria, was sparsely populated with Mexican citizens, leaving them and their towns isolated to military protection and Comanche attacks. By the time the Spanish or Mexican military could respond, the attacks were long over and the Comanches were long gone. The resources just weren't there to handle the Comanches, especially for the new Mexican government that had sprung up in the early 1820's. Hence, one of the reasons for the allowance of Anglo settlers from the US.

Quote:
Also, weren't the Texas Rangers started to protect ranchers, farmers, settlers, and the towns of Texas west of where I-35 now is from the Comanche? I am not a native Texan, and may not be remembering that part of the history correctly. I have seen those signs for the Texas Ranger museum -- the first time I saw them I thought it was strange that the Rangers would have a museum so far from The Ball Park up in Arlington! That isn't a joke. I really thought it was for the baseball team when I first saw the signs, but the distance made me reconsider. . .
Yes, that was the extent of Anglo settlement in the state at that time and yes, that was one of the reasons the Rangers were formed. The other reason was once Texas became a Republic, it didn't have nor could it afford a standing army to patrol the interior and control the borders between it and Mexico, so it was delegated to the Rangers to not only fight the Comanches but to also patrol the interior, handle border between the two states and other law enforcement issues, with the expenses of doing so mostly coming straight out of the rangers pocket.
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Old October 28th, 2014, 12:32 AM   #33
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Northeast because I had experienced staying at a Mohawk area in northern Ontario for a week. And also the three sisters (corn, squash, and beans) are kinda interesting.
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Old October 28th, 2014, 12:53 AM   #34
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I voted Great Plains. I read "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" when I was in high school and it was so interesting I read it twice. I was raised a stones throw from an Indian res in Washington state and the indians there had it pretty good with all the resources available, especially salmon and shellfish. I moved to Alaska when I was 18 and it's different when you go to eskimo villages where English is a second language for the elders.
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Old October 28th, 2014, 12:58 AM   #35
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I voted Great Plains. I read "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" when I was in high school and it was so interesting I read it twice. I was raised a stones throw from an Indian res in Washington state and the indians there had it pretty good with all the resources available, especially salmon and shellfish. I moved to Alaska when I was 18 and it's different when you go to eskimo villages where English is a second language for the elders.
This is very different. Some Mohawk elders that I met were very proficient in English, French, and even their Mohawk language. Although Mohawk is often the 2nd language for them.
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Old October 28th, 2014, 01:09 AM   #36
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This is very different. Some Mohawk elders that I met were very proficient in English, French, and even their Mohawk language. Although Mohawk is often the 2nd language for them.
Remoteness (location) and the fact that many villages have no white people living there. Most villages in Alaska are only accessible by airplane.


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Old December 30th, 2017, 08:43 AM   #37

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Old January 5th, 2018, 02:39 PM   #38
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Historically Cherokee and Iroquois.
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Old January 6th, 2018, 12:45 PM   #39
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I'm very interested in the Choctaw, especially as they sided with the Confederacy during the Civil War, which I find very intriguing.
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Old January 19th, 2018, 12:13 PM   #40

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Chippewas. We had several Chippewas in my local in Chicago so I knew more of them than any Indians. Arguably the most formidable of American Indians as they saw off the Iroquois to the east and Sioux to the west and along with their pals the Ottawa they were the eventual victors of the Beaver Wars.

The last fight the United States regular Army had with Indians was with Chippewas at Leech Lake Minnesota in 1898. The Chippewas won the fight. Marlins vs. Krags. ;-) They were also at the worst whipping the United States took from Indians, the Battle of the Wabash.

They also live in great walleye country and have successfully fought the states of Wisconsin and Minnesota for their treaty rights to harvest walleye. I was recently up in Fond du Lac Minnesota, outside Duluth, where the Fond du Lac band of Chippewas halted construction of a highway widening when Chippewa remains were found in the spoil. The Chippewas had warned the state beforehand there was a burial ground in the way but the state poo-pooed them and found out the hard way. Now all the spoil is being sifted for human remains before the road proceeds. Periodically the Chippewas hold a ceremony for the remains found, I witnessed one.

Last edited by Zip; January 19th, 2018 at 12:22 PM.
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