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Old October 13th, 2017, 03:03 PM   #101

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https://www.inquisitr.com/4549713/se...gypt-pyramids/

An interesting item. Second Sphinx?
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Old October 13th, 2017, 03:21 PM   #102

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https://www.inquisitr.com/4549713/se...gypt-pyramids/

An interesting item. Second Sphinx?
I highly doubt it. This comes from the fringe, who are not aware of how carefully Giza has been probed (above and below ground). And they're espousing the "10,000 years old" yarn, which no credible historian believes.

They're actually saying you can't carve with sand in the way. Well, no, probably not, but the remains of trackways show how the builders of these monuments tended to level the sites and remove the sand beforehand.

As for "always coming in pairs," that's certainly not necessarily true. And the existing Sphinx wasn't built so much as carved. The craftsmen made use of a knob of limestone jutting from the Plateau.

These two "researchers" are simply recycling the theory of Robert Schoch, and Schoch's theory has almost no academic standing.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 03:29 PM   #103

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Apologies, John B. I don't want you to think I was attacking you. I've just heard the "second Sphinx" theme perhaps a bit too much.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 03:30 PM   #104

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From the Grand Master.

Egypt's top archaeologist Hawass refutes city, tunnels under Sphinx - Xinhua | English.news.cn

Egypt's top archaeologist Hawass refutes city, tunnels under Sphinx

Another killshot on Egyptocranks
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Old October 13th, 2017, 03:32 PM   #105

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Originally Posted by kmt sesh View Post
I highly doubt it. This comes from the fringe, who are not aware of how carefully Giza has been probed (above and below ground). And they're espousing the "10,000 years old" yarn, which no credible historian believes.

They're actually saying you can't carve with sand in the way. Well, no, probably not, but the remains of trackways show how the builders of these monuments tended to level the sites and remove the sand beforehand.

As for "always coming in pairs," that's certainly not necessarily true. And the existing Sphinx wasn't built so much as carved. The craftsmen made use of a knob of limestone jutting from the Plateau.

These two "researchers" are simply recycling the theory of Robert Schoch, and Schoch's theory has almost no academic standing.
OK now that is the other half of the JAW team. Cranktologists.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 03:36 PM   #106
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I highly doubt it. This comes from the fringe, who are not aware of how carefully Giza has been probed (above and below ground). And they're espousing the "10,000 years old" yarn, which no credible historian believes.

They're actually saying you can't carve with sand in the way. Well, no, probably not, but the remains of trackways show how the builders of these monuments tended to level the sites and remove the sand beforehand.

As for "always coming in pairs," that's certainly not necessarily true. And the existing Sphinx wasn't built so much as carved. The craftsmen made use of a knob of limestone jutting from the Plateau.

These two "researchers" are simply recycling the theory of Robert Schoch, and Schoch's theory has almost no academic standing.
Yes, I'm familiar with this particular fringe "theory." It has to do with the alleged alignment between Orion and the pyramids around 10,500 BC. Edgar Cayce, the high priest of Crankdom espoused this particular point of view. It's all nonsense of course.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 03:37 PM   #107

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Well yes of course. However, undisciplined irregulars certainly would have scattered at the approach of chariots. In that sense, they certainly "could" have been used to break through enemy lines. Though with regards to professional Hittite and Mitanni troops, they would have served to mainly support the infantry. But yes, they most often were used to attack the flanks while the heavily armed spearmen would break through the enemy ranks. These of course, would have been supported by archers positioned on the wings of the main battle line.
I agree with your assessment. As stunning as chariots were, they proved to be less than ideal on the battlefield. They were largely abandoned by the Early Iron Age.

However, the Persians pulled them out of storage and dusted them off for their massive battle at Gaugamela against Alexander and his Macedonians (331 BCE). These were the fearsome chariots with scythed wheels. The chariots rushed headlong toward the Macedonian phalanx...so Alex's men just scooted aside and speared the chariot drivers. The huge Persian army was crushed that day.

Egypt is and always will be my favorite, but Alexander the Great was impressive.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 03:39 PM   #108

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OK now that is the other half of the JAW team. Cranktologists.
Cranktologists. Cranktology. I like those terms.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 03:41 PM   #109
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I agree with your assessment. As stunning as chariots were, they proved to be less than ideal on the battlefield. They were largely abandoned by the Early Iron Age.

However, the Persians pulled them out of storage and dusted them off for their massive battle at Gaugamela against Alexander and his Macedonians (331 BCE). These were the fearsome chariots with scythed wheels. The chariots rushed headlong toward the Macedonian phalanx...so Alex's men just scooted aside and speared the chariot drivers. The huge Persian army was crushed that day.

Egypt is and always will be my favorite, but Alexander the Great was impressive.
The Bronze Age collapse and the development of iron weapons proved to be the death knell for Egypt as a great power. When the Near East and Mediterranean used copper and bronze weaponry, Egyptian dominance was umatched. The warrior ethos of the Egyptians, combined with their sophisticated military organization, and the fanatical loyalty to the Pharaoh combined to make Egypt a formidable military force without equal.

With the advent of the Iron Age, Egypt lagged behind. This was due to both a relative lack of local iron deposits, as well as scarce wood resources for smelting the iron ore.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 03:55 PM   #110

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Cranktologists. Cranktology. I like those terms.
It gives the group a professional identity.
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