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Old December 24th, 2017, 10:11 PM   #1

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Ostia


About a year or so ago I happened upon a virtual loop of the Port of Ostia, I believe, in the First Century. Now I can't find it. Does anyone know where I might?
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Old December 25th, 2017, 08:50 AM   #2

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These are the two I could find- I think there was another made which I can't find anymore either but you might be referring to one of these.



Colonia Ostiensis ? A Computer Graphic Reconstruction

I saw this one before but only in very early stages, looks a bit more interesting now.

http://ostiaforumproject.com/forum-overall-in-3-d/
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Old December 29th, 2017, 10:34 AM   #3
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Was it perhaps Ostia Antica?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ostia_Antica


There are links at the bottom which may lead to a page with a video.

I found searching on ostia animation:



https://app.curiositystream.com/video/632/ostia-antica


Last edited by authun; December 29th, 2017 at 10:44 AM.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 12:22 PM   #4

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^
It's interesting to note that the ancient port of Ostia is today located further inland in the Tiber estuary.
If I'm correct, this is due to the material the river had accumulated over centuries.

Ostia was where Rome got most of its grain and other imports from overseas provinces. Claudius greatly expanded the port in the I century AD, and other Emperors also did it because of increased demands for grain and other goods.

And of course, Ostia is of major importance for modern archaeological research.
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Old January 4th, 2018, 11:09 PM   #5

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Thank you all so much
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Old February 11th, 2018, 10:12 PM   #6

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Does anyone know what statue, of whom, the BIG statue just inside the opening to the port of Ostia is?

It is depicted here in this link?

https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/...g&action=click

and why is it not in the following link, which looks, anyway, more scholarly to my unscholarly eyes...

https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/...g&action=click
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Old February 12th, 2018, 07:28 AM   #7

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeadCorn View Post
Does anyone know what statue, of whom, the BIG statue just inside the opening to the port of Ostia is?

It is depicted here in this link?

https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/...g&action=click

and why is it not in the following link, which looks, anyway, more scholarly to my unscholarly eyes...

https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/...g&action=click
Augustus? per this link https://books.google.com/books?id=7O...0Ostia&f=false

The drawing in your second link is of a much smaller area.
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Old February 12th, 2018, 11:39 AM   #8

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I think you must be right, David Vagamundo. At first I thought I read somewhere that it may have been Emperor Trajan, but it couldn't have been if the coin is from 64 AD. And that the ports name is after Augustus... I wonder what he is holding... if there's a significance to his stance? And thank you.
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Old February 12th, 2018, 03:00 PM   #9

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valens View Post
^
It's interesting to note that the ancient port of Ostia is today located further inland in the Tiber estuary.
If I'm correct, this is due to the material the river had accumulated over centuries.

Ostia was where Rome got most of its grain and other imports from overseas provinces. Claudius greatly expanded the port in the I century AD, and other Emperors also did it because of increased demands for grain and other goods.

And of course, Ostia is of major importance for modern archaeological research.
I went there in 1991. It was amazing- go into this field, and there are houses, streets, coloured murals, public latrines- then you come to exotic mosaics with nautical themes, where the harbour met the sea- a line in the fields, that's where the sea was!
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Old February 12th, 2018, 04:17 PM   #10

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeadCorn View Post
I think you must be right, David Vagamundo. At first I thought I read somewhere that it may have been Emperor Trajan, but it couldn't have been if the coin is from 64 AD. And that the ports name is after Augustus... I wonder what he is holding... if there's a significance to his stance? And thank you.
The Sestertius is a famous coin of Nero with birds-eye view of the harbour at Ostia; Claudius began the construction of Ostia and it was extended and completed by Nero.

It is unlikely that the statue commemorates Augustus; were this the case then the reference would be to Divus Augustus.

The coin mentions Portus Augusti- this was the name of the port, Portus Augusti Ostiensis- here I believe Augustus refers to the title of the reigning emperor, that is, Nero, who is taking credit for the construction of the port and its benefits.Given Nero's approach to Seneca's pumpkinification of Claudius, it is very unlikely he is giving credit to his predecessor and in any case the reference would be to Divus Claudius and not Augustus. I understand that the statue may have stood atop the lighthouse rather than standing bestriding the harbour entrance.
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