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Old June 14th, 2018, 06:44 AM   #11

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Originally Posted by markdienekes View Post
I'm with Antigonos on this one, he ultimately defeated Eumunes, who had fought well but was out-generaled by Antigonos on a number of occasions, and as Sala mentioned, his campaigns against the Perdikkans were impressive, so to his swift victories against three Persian armies which were operating behind Alexander's lines.
Wasn't that Antipater?
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Old June 14th, 2018, 07:18 AM   #12

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Antipater was Alexander's regent in Macedonia the whole time, from when Alexander left to way past his death.
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Old June 14th, 2018, 07:48 AM   #13

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Antipater was Alexander's regent in Macedonia the whole time, from when Alexander left to way past his death.
So it was, my mistake...get confused between those two sometimes.
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Old June 14th, 2018, 09:02 AM   #14
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Guarding your baggage train so the enemy doesn't capture it is part of generaling. And politics, that too.
Politics are not part of generaling or a very minor part in it because many great generals were not independent in their commands, they had to obey their rulers.

Baggage train was a mistake which was easy to correct as other poster wrote. A major thing was a betrayal of his subordinates. They payed for it though.
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Old June 14th, 2018, 09:16 AM   #15

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It wasn't easy to correct, Eumenes failed because his subordinates could see that it wouldn't be. His phalanx was useless against cavalry, and Antigonus had the advantage of more and better cavalry.
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Old June 14th, 2018, 03:32 PM   #16

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Originally Posted by markdienekes View Post
At Gabiene, Eumenes' cavalry had routed because they'd been whipped by Antigonos, much like his phalanx had been whipped by Eumenes.

It's probably best to remember Diodoros' words here (19.44.1):


Quote:
Now that Antigonus had unexpectedly mastered Eumenes and all the army that had been opposing him...
The question is, why "unexpectedly"? The answer is in the description (19.42.4-6):



Quote:
While this was taking place, Antigonus joined battle with those who were opposite him and by appearing with a large number of cavalry struck panic into Peucestes, satrap of Persia, who in retiring from the dust cloud with his own cavalry drew away fifteen hundred others as well. 5 Eumenes, although he and a few troopers were left unsupported at the extremity of the wing, regarded it as shameful to yield to fortune and flee; preferring to die while still upholding with noble resolution the trust that had been given him by the kings, he forced his way toward Antigonus himself. 6 A fierce cavalry battle ensued, in which Eumenes' men were superior in spirit but those of Antigonus had the advantage in number...

Eumenes is here deserted by a minimum 1,700 cavalry just as the battle had begun. Eumenes' problem was not his abilities as a general; it was his compromised command. Roisman may be right that the satraps had decided he couldn't win but leaving him as battle commenced was a dangerous tactic: they may well have fallen in the rout. It is instructive that of the satraps, it is only Antigenes who is killed (along with Eudamos who was technically not a satrap). There is likely to have some communications between Eumenes' camp and that of Antigonos. Diodoros is clear: Peukestas retired without fighting. While Antigonos removed him from his satrapy (Persis), this was because he was very popular. He did not kill him but kept him in his entourage. He was not about to have another Peithon at his back.
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Old June 14th, 2018, 03:47 PM   #17
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Nearly all the Diadochi died violently, in battle like Antigonus or assassinated like the victor Seleucus.

However Ptolemy died at 84 in his bed, master of Egypt, which was a very productive and ordered kingdom upon his death, beloved by his subjects. Notably he established the Great Library of Alexandria, as well as a dynasty that would last for centuries into the Roman era.

He wasn't the greatest, but I think he was the one who won Survivor Diadochi.

Last edited by jalidi; June 14th, 2018 at 03:53 PM. Reason: edit: spelling
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Old June 14th, 2018, 05:08 PM   #18

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Ptolemy was no slouch as a general either, to be honest. A lot of these men were very good.
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Old June 14th, 2018, 05:18 PM   #19

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Exactly, they all served under Alexander and Philip for many years.
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Old June 15th, 2018, 03:28 PM   #20

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Originally Posted by markdienekes View Post
It wasn't easy to correct, Eumenes failed because his subordinates could see that it wouldn't be. His phalanx was useless against cavalry, and Antigonus had the advantage of more and better cavalry.
I disagree on the cavalry. Eumenes had the Silver Shields, until they betrayed him. Antigonus had a harder time against him than people think/realise, imo.
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