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Old December 29th, 2008, 07:21 AM   #11

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Re: Depictions of Akhenaten


What do y'all think about the theory of head shaping? I mean, I know that the Mayans used to do it and I too noticed that all of Akhenaten's family had that weird head shape. It actually is noticeable in his father's father-in-law, Yuya, as well -- not in drawings, but in his actual mummy.

Marfan syndrome is rare, according to Mayo Clinic. but has a 50% chance of being passed onto children with only ONE parent having it; if Nefertiti had it as well... well maybe it was more likely. I'm not sure how likely it was for two parents and the grandfather's father-in-law to have it, though...

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mar...ndrome/DS00540.

I can't find much information on Froehlich Syndrome, so no comment...

So, does anyone know if head shaping become popular around that time?

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Old January 6th, 2009, 04:40 AM   #12
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Re: Depictions of Akhenaten


Akhenaten, which means servant of the sungod Aton, changed the polytheistic Egyptian religion to a monotheistic religon. He probably did this to break the ever growing power of the class of priests. He founded a new capital near modern day el-Amarna. This is why we now speak of the Amarna–style when talking of art from during Akhenaten’s reign.

The art looks very different if compared with traditional Egyptian art, which nearly didn't evolve during it's existence. First of all in the Amarna-style there is a significant interest for contemporary events, while traditional Egyptian art was more future-orientated. There are also a lot of images of the private life of the pharaoh and his family where personal feelings such as grief and affection are depicted. Instead of the traditional portrait of the body they now stressed the long back of the head, small face and the plump belly of Akhenaten. These marks are so over exaggerated that we can speak of a “caricatural Amarna-style”.

The depiction of Akhenaten must be based on his looks, which can be caused by incest. It was not uncommon for pharaohs to marry their sisters as their first wives in order to prevent inheritance and succession quarrels.
Because Akhenaten was the personification of the new god Aton his looks were seen as ideal. Other people would depict themselves with his looks because they wanted to look as their pharaoh, god.
The Amarna period only lasted for 17 years, under influence of the priests of Amon the drastic changes made by Akhenaten were undone during the reign of his still very young son Tutankhamun. Most of the buildings built by Akhenaten were destroyed and his capital became a ghost town. Ironic is the fact that due to the short reign of Tutankhamun, most of the treasures burried with him are in Amarna-style.
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Old December 10th, 2009, 11:22 AM   #13
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Re: Depictions of Akhenaten


There are several theories, each with its own merits, perhaps it was a combination of a couple different theories. I found this article rather interesting: http://egyptian-history.suite101.com...raoh_akhenaten
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Old December 10th, 2009, 11:43 AM   #14

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Re: Depictions of Akhenaten


I read Allen Drury's books ( historical fiction) A God against the Gods and Return to Thebes and believe that he favored the theory that Akhenaten had Adiposogenital dystrophy or Frolich syndrome. I am not sure what he based this on though.
Click the image to open in full size.
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Old December 10th, 2009, 12:01 PM   #15

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Re: Depictions of Akhenaten


Akhenaten, it is my understanding, wanted to dispel the glorified image of the robust pharaoh. He wanted to be displayed 'as is'. Surely he saw the finished product & if he didn't approve then the artist would have had to start over.
Akhenaten's displays are also unique as showing father-children interaction and at times, with the queen on equal grounds as the pharaoh. His vision was just too radical for the times.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 02:50 PM   #16
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Re: Depictions of Akhenaten


If Akhnaton's mummy could be positively identified the question would be answered. Medical people believe he had Marfan's disease; there is a society of people in the United States afflicted with Marfanism, or with the closely related Froehlic disorder. The appearance of these people reminds one of Akhnaton. Yes, he is also Amenhotep IV, but he preferred to be known as Akhnaton. He closed down all the temples of the Egyptian gods except for those of the Aten, which is the sun's disk, ascribing all things created to it. I don't know if Tutankhamen was his son (the jury is still out) but originally his name was Tutankhaten and his wife's name was Ankhsenaten. The priests of Amon-Ra, the national sun god, restored the ancient worship of the gods after Akhnaten died. There is much about this period that is unknown or uncertain; certainly artwork was aimed at showing things as they were, not the iconic figures usually seen on temple and tomb walls. As he married at least one of his own daughters, the possiblity of Marfan disease was greatly increased in any offspring they would have. Note in the Old Testament, Psalm 104 is based on the Hymn to the Aten.
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Old December 14th, 2009, 07:51 PM   #17
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Re: Depictions of Akhenaten


I happen to believe that Velikovsky's view is most correct!

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Old December 15th, 2009, 03:42 AM   #18

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Re: Depictions of Akhenaten


Remember, marriage between father-daughter was symbolic in perpetuating the image of a stable & continual throne to the people. Pharaoh had one main queen, but many, many secondary wives.
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Old December 15th, 2009, 07:00 AM   #19
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Re: Depictions of Akhenaten


Quote:
Originally Posted by galteeman View Post
he changed the religion to worship the new god the Aten.
Aten was already a god when Thoutmose I was king.
Quote:
Originally Posted by galteeman View Post
his son tutankamun was originally called tutankaten but after his fathers death and the fall of the god aten and replacement by the old god amun he was obliged to change his name.
After Akhenaten there were two kings (in fact a king and then a queen). Aten names are still present in Tut's tomb.
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Originally Posted by Thuyu View Post
What do y'all think about the theory of head shaping?
This is not a theory, such a head has been found at Amarna (cf. BIFAO 15) As far as representations are concerned you can see representation of such type of head down to Horemheb's time (Maya's tomb at Saqqara). IMHO This type of head could be of mitannian origin.
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Originally Posted by Charles le Temeraire View Post
He probably did this to break the ever growing power of the class of priests.
Unlikely. The first four priests were hand picked by the king and the others by the vizir. In any case being a priest was a trade not a vocation. IMHO with the growing number of people who were adressing prayers directly to the state god Amon, the king was becoming less important. With Aten, Akhenaten was again the main officiant and the only one who talked to God.
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I don't know if Tutankhamen was his son (the jury is still out)
We know for sure Tut was the son of a king and Akhenaten is the only possible one (The coregency debat with Amenhotep III is now over).
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Originally Posted by tjadams View Post
Remember, marriage between father-daughter was symbolic
Akhenaten did have grand-children with his own daughters. Under such latitude, a girl could be pregnant at the age of 9-10.
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Old February 10th, 2010, 06:45 PM   #20

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Re: Depictions of Akhenaten


Looks like Tutanhkamen may have had the same condition.




Click the image to open in full size. Peek Inside A CT scan of the skull of King Tut, who may have been his son, shows the same abnormal head shape. K. Garrett/National Geographic

Also, from a University of Maryland study/ article:

"Dr. Braverman says he found some evidence of familial gynecomastia in depictions of Akhenaten’s father, grandfather and great-grandfather as well as in the founder of the 18th Dynasty, Tuthmosis I, six generations earlier. King Tut, who may have been Akhenaten’s brother, also had gynecomastia. In addition, Dr. Braverman says a relief of Akhenaten and his family seems to confirm his theory of this inherited defect. A relief shows Akhenaten holding one daughter and Nefertiti holding another. On the floor is a third princess who appears to be 6 to 7 years old, with breasts indicating isosexual precocity. Two other statues of princesses as children 3 to 5 years old depict them with breasts as well. “If they really had breasts at that age, this would prove the presence of the aromatase excess syndrome,” says Dr. Braverman." http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...%3D21%26um%3D1
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