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Old January 6th, 2013, 11:52 AM   #51

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According toAlan Wilson and Baram Blackett in their King Arthur: True British History the Palace of Arthur is in a field of ruins less than a mile from Llanilltydfawr , now called Llantwit Major on the Glamorganshire coast , that they believe was destroyed in a comet strike around AD 562/3 .

Large walls and many mounds still stick up through the grass of the field , the total perimeter walls of which are approx. 11 acres.

They say that in 1888 , because of lack of interest from any official bodies to investigate , what they, the locals knew from tradition were important historic sites, they took it upon themselves to excavate the site, they very quickly uncovered many bodies of not only people , but a larger than expected numbers of horses .

In another 2 acre section , in an 8 acre enclosure , they uncovered the remains of 20 rooms , one of which was 60ft long by 51 ft wide , and some parts of the walls were still 9 ft high , .. in another room 39 ft wide by 27 ft long , the plastered walls were covered by painted murals , they say they found 43 skeletons in this one room , and the bones of 3 more horses.


the locals decided to leave the site and call the authorities to inform them of what they had found,but apparently the local records show that " men in suits " arrived from London , closed the site down, re-turfed the grass and banned any more excavation.

according to the writers "there was no wish on behalf of the German Hanoverians in the guise of the Prince of Wales " to put on show the last resting places of the British Khumry Kings.

Some of the skulls have apparently been carbon dated to AD 560 period . as they say their research shows that as King Arthur 2 , was King in Glamorgan as the Teyrn or monarch of Britain , that this site is one of the most likely to have been his palace.

However according to them excavations of many sites in South Wales have been declared no go areas for Archaeologists , whilst i cannot see that Britain is going to overthrow the Present Monarchy if these sites were investigated Wilson and Blackett still seem convinced that they have knowledge of many sites which are purposely not being acknowledged.

Last edited by ib-issi; January 6th, 2013 at 11:59 AM.
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Old January 7th, 2013, 01:13 AM   #52

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There is a strong argument, partially underlined by Gildas himself, that our original Arthur has a welsh origin. I'm not entirely convinced however, and as much as I'm willing to read the work of 19th century researchers (they sometimes made interesting finds and observations), they lacked modern insight and methods.
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Old January 8th, 2013, 04:12 AM   #53

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explicitly:
  • Gildas cursed Cynlas Goch (Cuneglasse), son of Owain Ddant-gwyn ("tooth-white"), king of Rhos near (northeast) Gwynedd
  • Gildas wrote that cursed Cuneglasse was “guider of the chariot which is the receptacle of the bear“:
    • "You bear, you rider and ruler of many, and guider of the chariot which is the receptacle of the bear"
    • "You contempter of God and vilifier of his order"
    • "You tawny butcher, as in the Latin tongue thy name signifies" [in Welsh, "hound-red" ?]
    • one who raises war against men, indeed against his own countrymen, as well as against God
    • one who has "thrown out of doors your wife" and lustfully desires "her detestable sister who had vowed unto God, the everlasting chastity of widowhood"
  • "bear" in Welsh is Arth (cp. Artio, female bear goddess of Gaul, commensurate with the feminine "receptacle" reference), seemingly implying "Arthur"
600 years later, Caradoc of Llancarfan, contemporary colleague of Geoffrey of Monmouth, wrote that Gildas' two brothers rose against Arthur, refusing to acknowledge him as their lord. Arthur pursued, and slew, Huail ap Caw, the eldest brother; whilst Gildas was preaching in Armagh in (northern) Ireland. Prima facie, intense animosity existed, between Arthur, and Gildas. Gildas hated Arthur so much, that Gildas could not directly name "that bear of a man", but only make a single indirect innuendo -- whilst comparing Arthur, and all his allies, to Biblical beasts of the Book of Revelation.

Gildas' references to civil war ("war against his own countrymen"), in 6th century AD Britain, straightforwardly suggest strife between "pro-Roman" and "pro-pagan" (secessionist, independence) camps. Gildas' apocalyptic references imply Daniel 7, which describes four beasts: lion, bear, leopard, and one with "iron teeth" (Ddant-haern ?). The reference to "teeth" resembles Owain Ddant-gwyn; "iron teeth" refer to Roman legions' swords (gladii). So, Gildas seemingly curses the "pro-Roman" faction. Gildas presumably disliked Saxons, too. But, Gildas seemingly disliked all foreign, non-Britons, in Britain. So, he did not support freedom from Saxons, at the cost of fealty to Romans. Gildas was, seemingly, a "Celtic Christian".

Indeed, Gildas praises Gallo-Roman aristocrats, like Emperor Constantine III, who fathered Ambrosius Aurelianus; and who promoted the family of Sidonius Apollinaris. Thus, Gildas implies, that the Gallic Empire had strong leaders of its own, e.g. Ambrosius Aurelianus of Imperial pedigree; and so needed no upstart provincials in their chariots, for any reason.


footnote:
Caradoc also wrote that Gildas:
  • was educated in Gaul
  • retired to a hermitage dedicated to the Trinity at Street near Glastonbury
  • was buried at Glastonbury Abbey
  • intervened between Arthur and Melwas, king of Somerset, who had abducted Guinevere to his stronghold at Glastonbury, where Arthur soon besieged him, until Gildas persuaded Melwas to release Guinevere, and the two kings made peace
Thus, Caradoc recorded connections, between Britain, and Brittany.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Widdekind View Post
...

c.545 AD, the British monk Gildas wrote De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae. The word "ex-cidio", typically translated as "ruin", literally means "out-cut" (cp. homi-cide). Thus, the very first word of the work connotes connections "outside" of, and beyond, Britain. And, Gildas goes on to excoriate coastal kings of Britain, of lands along the Irish seashore, by comparison, to the "beasts" & Babylonian "whores" of the Book of Revelation:
  • "Constantine the tyrannical whelp of the unclean lioness of Damnonia"
  • "thou lion's whelp Aurelius Conanus [of Dumnonia]"
  • "Vortipore ... who like to the spotted leopard ... tyrant of the Demetians"
  • "Cuneglasse ... thou bear [of southern Gwynedd]"
  • "dragon of the island ... Maglocune [of Gwynedd]"
Click the image to open in full size.
Thus, Gildas' volley of vituperations slander post-Roman kings of Britain, by Biblical comparisons, to the "beasts" and Babylonian "whores" of the Book of Revelation. Gildas also puns on the words "damned", "Damnonia", "Dumnonia". But, Gildas seems to spare Britons living inland (along the borders with the Saxons?). Ipso facto, Gildas seems to suggesting that "Biblical beasts from the seas" sowed the sins that "betrayed (and backstabbed?) the Britons"...

Last edited by Widdekind; January 8th, 2013 at 04:50 AM.
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Old January 8th, 2013, 06:38 AM   #54

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c.400 AD, the Romano-British general Cunedda, from Gododdin (north of Hadrian's wall, south of Antonius' wall), was transferred to Gwynedd (northwest Wales), to defend Wales' shores against pirate raids

c.500 AD, Cunedda's grandson Maelgwn was cursed as colleague of Arthur "the bear", by Gildas
Ipso facto, perhaps Arthur was a descendant, or kinsman, of Cunedda? Cunedda's pedigree, and family tree, preserve names at first Roman, and then clearly Christian, implying that late Roman commanders were recruited from families with centuries of service to Rome. (Such sounds similar, if very vaguely, to the Sarmatian legend of Arthur.)

Prima facie, Gildas seemingly saw himself as a "Boudica Britton", and Arthurians as "Cunedda collaborators", who had spent centuries assisting an "occupying power". So strong, seemingly, were his personal opinions, that Gildas made appeal to "God in heaven" (Book of Revelation) against the "Divine" Caesars.

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Old January 8th, 2013, 08:42 AM   #55

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Widdekind View Post
explicitly:[LIST][*]Gildas cursed Cynlas Goch (Cuneglasse), son of Owain Ddant-gwyn ("tooth-white"), king of Rhos near (northeast) Gwynedd[*]Gildas wrote that cursed Cuneglasse was “guider of the chariot which is the receptacle of the bear“:
[LIST][*]"You bear, you rider and ruler of many, and guider of the chariot which is the receptacle of the bear"
Notice here that Gildas is calling Cuneglasse a bear. There is no hidden allusion to (an unnamed) Arthur.
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Old January 9th, 2013, 03:49 AM   #56

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No he isn't. He says Cuneglasus was the 'Bears Charioteer' in his younger days.
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Old January 9th, 2013, 08:15 AM   #57

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Originally Posted by caldrail View Post
No he isn't. He says Cuneglasus was the 'Bears Charioteer' in his younger days.
I thought he said "You bear,...charioteer of the bear's stronghold"? If the second 'bear' is not Cuneglasus (and that's ambiguous), then the first 'bear' certainly is.
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Old January 9th, 2013, 10:32 AM   #58

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c.400 AD, Irish high-king Niall 'of the nine hostages' was assassinated, whilst on his way, to a pan-Pictish peace conference, by envious Eochaid, who sniped him with an arrow in the back, from across some Scottish valley.

In 411 AD, British-born emperor Constantine III was assassinated, in Gaul, by a Pict, a believed bodyguard, who lured him into a trap, and stabbed him with a dagger, apparently paid by the Roman emperor (Honorius).
Prima facie, when Roman rule was weakening in Britain, Rome resorted to subterfuge & spycraft.
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Old January 9th, 2013, 10:34 AM   #59

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c.400 AD, future western Emperor Constantine was (privately?) recognized as (a?) sovereign of Britain, at Silchester (southern Britain).

c.530 AD, the young Gildas negotiated a truce, between Arthur and Melwas, king of Glastonbury in Somerset.

c.545 AD, Gildas cursed the coastal kings of Cornwall & Wales, who had apparently been the base of support for Arthur, e.g. Cuneglasse of Gwynedd had been the driver of the chariot of "the bear".
Civil strife seems plainly apparent, between Britain & Wales. Ironically, Gildas demonstrates deep divisions between seemingly similar ethnic groups, which weakened them all, which weakness had allowed the Romans to conquer them, firstly; and the Saxons to reconquer them, secondly. Thereby, Gildas corroborates his Christianity, cp. Luke 12:51+ ("read Jesus Christ's lips"):
Quote:
Do you think I came to bring peace on earth? No, I tell you, but division. From now on there will be five in one family divided against each other, three against two and two against three. They will be divided, father against son and son against father, mother against daughter and daughter against mother, mother-in-law against daughter-in-law and daughter-in-law against mother-in-law.
According to "Divine" Julius Caesar, division implies conquest (total division, total conquest). By comparison, pagan peoples apparently worked well together, e.g. Scots-Irish, Germans, and others, under Wanius (Guanius) & Melga ("proto-Vikings" ?).
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Old January 9th, 2013, 11:30 AM   #60

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Arthur "the bear" & Cuneglasse of southern Gwynedd ?
Click the image to open in full size.

flying a "Dragon standard" of Gwynedd (cp. Welsh Dragon vs. English "Saint" George the Dragon-slayer) ?
Click the image to open in full size.
"Two dragons addorsed—that is, back to back—are ascribed to Arthur"
(i.e. one [red] dragon, on each side, of a Sarmatian-like narrow tapering pennant, with their wings "adduced", ready for flight?)

Last edited by Widdekind; January 9th, 2013 at 12:32 PM.
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