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Old December 6th, 2012, 04:56 AM   #1

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Ancient europeans and the s factor


Why[ancient greeks] they name all persian[Ariaramnes,cyrus,cambysses,etc] and indian kings [sandrocottus,xandrames,etc]ending with an s?
And even today we see river Sindhu as Indus

Did they have problem writing down some words ?
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Old December 6th, 2012, 05:45 AM   #2

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Greeks tried to hellenize the names ecountered by them. Most of Greek proper nouns are suffixed -as/-es according to the first declension, and the most common -os according to the second declension.

Cyrus and Sandrocottus are Latin forms, because classical Latin suffixed most of male names -us.

What I really wonder is why and when Indo-Aryan languages stopped suffixing with -s, which was closer to Proto-Indoeuropean if I remember well.
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Old December 6th, 2012, 06:45 AM   #3

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I think its more of a grammer thing than hellenization.
Ex:In my language we end some proper mouns with udu Bheem[sanskrit]=Bheemudu[telugu],
sun[english]surya[sanskrit]=suryudu[telugu],
moon[english]chandra[sanskrit]=chandrudu[telugu] so on...
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Old December 6th, 2012, 07:15 AM   #4

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With "hellenization" I want to say: making something to look Greek.

It's natural for speakers to transform foreign words into something more familiar. Grammar plays the decissive role of course.

Bharata, had you gone the opposite route, how would you make the greek name "Alexandros" to sound more alike to Telugu and Sanskrit? Or the river "Eurotas"?
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Old December 7th, 2012, 02:08 AM   #5

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more like alachander or alachandra
[never found the use of X and Z in sanskrit or telugu though i may be wrong usually ja used instead of za and cha/sa instead of xa]

what is eurotas pronounciation?

Last edited by Bharata; December 7th, 2012 at 02:20 AM.
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Old December 7th, 2012, 11:27 AM   #6

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bharata View Post
more like alachander or alachandra
[never found the use of X and Z in sanskrit or telugu though i may be wrong usually ja used instead of za and cha/sa instead of xa]

what is eurotas pronounciation?
Basically Greeks tried to make foreign names sound close to theirs. E.g Kurush doesn't sound so Greek, so they make it Kuros and then the Latins made it Cyrus. There are many examples like that.

As for Eurotas, depending on the time we refer to is pronounced Eurɔːtas or Evrɔːtas or Evroutas. I would stick to plain Evrotas, which is more or less what it sounded like for most of the time (~ 300 B.C - today).
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Old December 7th, 2012, 12:12 PM   #7

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Its hard sometimes to understand pronnounciations in british english
lol no offence
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Old December 7th, 2012, 12:13 PM   #8

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Midas View Post
Basically Greeks tried to make foreign names sound close to theirs. E.g Kurush doesn't sound so Greek, so they make it Kuros and then the Latins made it Cyrus. There are many examples like that.

As for Eurotas, depending on the time we refer to is pronounced Eurɔːtas or Evrɔːtas or Evroutas. I would stick to plain Evrotas, which is more or less what it sounded like for most of the time (~ 300 B.C - today).
Oh this kurush sounds to close to kuru tribe described in indian epics
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Old December 7th, 2012, 12:53 PM   #9

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Originally Posted by Bharata View Post
Its hard sometimes to understand pronnounciations in british english
lol no offence
I know it is terrible. That's why there is a thing called
International_Phonetic_Alphabet International_Phonetic_Alphabet
.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bharata View Post
Oh this kurush sounds to close to kuru tribe described in indian epics
That is Cyrus actually
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Old December 7th, 2012, 10:15 PM   #10

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Midas View Post
I know it is terrible. That's why there is a thing called IPA.



That is Cyrus actually
But you said it was kurush.
Calling him cyrus doesnt change his original name.
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