Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > Ancient History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

Ancient History Ancient History Forum - Greece, Rome, Carthage, Egypt, Mesopotamia, and all other civilizations of antiquity, to include Prehistory and Archaeology discussions


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 15th, 2013, 09:50 PM   #1
Academician
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 60
Ancient Egyptian in Arabic


If I can make the assumption that the present population of Egypt are largely the same racial stock as the ancient Egyptians & that Arabic was imposed on them with the Conquest, how much, if any, of their old language survives?
ochoin is offline  
Remove Ads
Old January 16th, 2013, 08:21 AM   #2
Academician
 
Joined: Jan 2013
Posts: 67

A little of the vocabulary and syntax in Egyptian Arabic comes from Egyptian, but only little. In fact the true descendant of Ancient Egyptian still exists: Coptic. It is rather like Latin in Western Europe, not really spoken any more but there are a few people left who can read and write it (the Coptic Christians).
Copperknickers is offline  
Old January 18th, 2013, 03:59 PM   #3

The Black Knight's Avatar
Lecturer
 
Joined: Dec 2012
From: USA
Posts: 440

Quote:
Originally Posted by ochoin View Post
If I can make the assumption that the present population of Egypt are largely the same racial stock as the ancient Egyptians & that Arabic was imposed on them with the Conquest, how much, if any, of their old language survives?
Arabic took maybe only 300 years to displace the Koine Greek of the region, but perhaps it took as late as the 19th Century finished off Coptic as a spoken language of the region.
The Black Knight is offline  
Old January 20th, 2013, 11:03 AM   #4

Niki86's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jan 2011
From: Balkans
Posts: 1,190

Quote:
It is rather like Latin in Western Europe, not really spoken any more but there are a few people left who can read and write it (the Coptic Christians).
The Coptic Christians are 10% of the population there and I highly doubt that they all speak it. It would be like 7 millions native speakers and the language would not be considered dead. Only 300 people are able to read and write Coptic.
Niki86 is offline  
Old January 21st, 2013, 03:16 PM   #5

Menshevik's Avatar
Pseudo-Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2012
From: The People's Republic of California.
Posts: 4,453

Quote:
Originally Posted by ochoin View Post
If I can make the assumption that the present population of Egypt are largely the same racial stock as the ancient Egyptians & that Arabic was imposed on them with the Conquest, how much, if any, of their old language survives?
I'd say you're wrong in assuming the present day Egyptians are the same racial stock as the ancient Egyptians. I'd say they're Arabs, modern day Egyptians have more in common(genetically speaking) with Iraqis than they do with the builders of the Pyramids. Just my opinion of course, I'm no expert.
Menshevik is offline  
Old January 21st, 2013, 03:35 PM   #6
Historian
 
Joined: Oct 2009
From: San Diego
Posts: 2,169

well, you would be wrong there...
Genetics shows that modern Egyptians show genetic consistency with the ancient specimens. That they were and still are, genetically, the people of North East Africa.

Islam was a religious movement that swept thru.... but it was not a physical migration or displacement... ( unlike what happened in Europe where almost no group has any significant genetic consistency to a given area other than the Basques )
sculptingman is offline  
Old January 21st, 2013, 05:15 PM   #7
Citizen
 
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 25

Quote:
Originally Posted by sculptingman View Post
well, you would be wrong there...
Genetics shows that modern Egyptians show genetic consistency with the ancient specimens. That they were and still are, genetically, the people of North East Africa.

Islam was a religious movement that swept thru.... but it was not a physical migration or displacement... ( unlike what happened in Europe where almost no group has any significant genetic consistency to a given area other than the Basques )

Which 'genetic' study would you be talking about, eh?


ALL the published genetic studies on actual ANCIENT EGYPTIAN REMAINS OR MUMMIES (not controversial modelling from modern populations- which give different results depending on methodology, sampling, deposition of the author etc ) give genetic profiles that are 'southern' and certainly significantly 'dissimilar' from those of modern Egyptians (although it depends again from where one is taken the samples from since modern Egyptians are very DIVERSE with 'African', 'Near Eastern' and 'European' profiles).

The published genetic study am talking about are :
- those of some 12th Dynasty mummies by Paablo et al 1993;
- those on the Amarna pharoahs by Hawaa et al 2010;
- those on Ramese III and his son by Hawass et al 2012;
- those on neolithic 'Nubians' (relatives of some predynastic Upper Egyptians)

Again, which 'genetic' study would you be talking about??
odia is offline  
Old January 21st, 2013, 05:16 PM   #8

Menshevik's Avatar
Pseudo-Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2012
From: The People's Republic of California.
Posts: 4,453

Quote:
Originally Posted by sculptingman View Post
well, you would be wrong there...
Genetics shows that modern Egyptians show genetic consistency with the ancient specimens. That they were and still are, genetically, the people of North East Africa.

Islam was a religious movement that swept thru.... but it was not a physical migration or displacement... ( unlike what happened in Europe where almost no group has any significant genetic consistency to a given area other than the Basques )
"An Arab is a person whose language is Arabic, who lives in an Arabic-speaking country, and who is in sympathy with the aspirations of the Arabic-speaking peoples.[8]"- That's the definition of an Arab according to the Arab League. Also the full name of Egypt is A.R.E.= Arab Republic of Egypt. And, I actually lived there back in 2005, and if you asked an Egyptian he would probably tell you he was Arab. How about Iraqis? Are they not Arabs? Jordanians? Syrians?
Menshevik is offline  
Old January 22nd, 2013, 02:33 AM   #9

cachibatches's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Posts: 1,543

Quote:
Originally Posted by odia View Post
Which 'genetic' study would you be talking about, eh?


ALL the published genetic studies on actual ANCIENT EGYPTIAN REMAINS OR MUMMIES (not controversial modelling from modern populations- which give different results depending on methodology, sampling, deposition of the author etc ) give genetic profiles that are 'southern' and certainly significantly 'dissimilar' from those of modern Egyptians (although it depends again from where one is taken the samples from since modern Egyptians are very DIVERSE with 'African', 'Near Eastern' and 'European' profiles).

The published genetic study am talking about are :
- those of some 12th Dynasty mummies by Paablo et al 1993;
- those on the Amarna pharoahs by Hawaa et al 2010;
- those on Ramese III and his son by Hawass et al 2012;
- those on neolithic 'Nubians' (relatives of some predynastic Upper Egyptians)

Again, which 'genetic' study would you be talking about??
Not this again. Even the statement about mummies is untrue.

The modern Egyptians are 90% genetically identical to the ancients. Egypt and the rest of North Africa is heavily mixed Eurasian since Neolithic times. We know this from genetic studies on both moderns and mummies. There were no massive invasions of Assyrians, Perisan, Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Turks, Hyksos or sea peoples. Every scientific study agrees. Here is about twenty of them:

VARIOUS DNA STUDIES PROVING EURASIAN ADMIXUTRE IN ANCIENT EGYPTIANS:


Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Diversity in a Sedentary Population from Egypt
A. Stevanovitch
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1529-8817.2003.00057.x/full
Mitochondrial genetic data from North Africa are documented by two groups of populations: one composed of populations of the Nile Valley, and the other by populations of the Maghreb. The Nile Valley has been shown to be a migration corridor with populations connected by gene flow (Krings et al. 1999), and phylogeographical analysis of mitochondrial lineages of populations from the Maghreb suggests that modern humans appeared from the Near East following at least two migrations around 50 000 years and 10 000 years ago. A possible migration from Europe may also have occurred during the Neolithic period (Macaulay et al. 1999).

Population history of north Africa: evidence from classical genetic markers.-
Bosch
http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/9708245325/population-history-north-africa-evidence-from-classical-genetic-markers
After an intensive bibliographic search, we compiled all the available data on allele frequencies for classical genetic polymorphisms referring to North African populations and synthesized the data in an attempt to reconstruct the populations' demographic history using two complementary methods: (1) principal components analysis and (2) genetic distances represented by neighbor-joining trees. In both analyses the main feature of the genetic landscape in northern Africa is an east-west pattern of variation pointing to the differentiation between the Berber and Arab population groups of the northwest and the populations of Libya and Egypt. Moreover, Libya and Egypt show the smallest genetic distances with the European populations, including the Iberian Peninsula. The most plausible interpretation of these results is that, although demic diffusion during the Neolithic could explain the genetic similarity between northeast Africa and Europe by a parallel process of gene flow from the Near East, a Mesolithic (or older) differentiation of the populations in the northwestern regions with later limited gene flow is needed to understand the genetic picture. The most isolated groups (Mauritanians, Tuaregs, and south Algerian Berbers) were the most differentiated and, although no clear structure can be discerned among the different Arab- and Berber-speaking groups, Arab speakers as a whole are closer to Egyptians and Libyans. By contrast, the genetic contribution of sub-Saharan Africa appears to be small.


Near eastern neolithic genetic input in a small oasis of the Egyptian Western Desert.
Am J Phys Anthropol.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19425100
Notwithstanding signs of expected genetic drift, we still found clear genetic evidence of a strong Near Eastern input that can be dated into the Neolithic. This is revealed by high frequencies and high internal variability of several mtDNA lineages from haplogroup T. The whole genome sequencing strategy and molecular dating allowed us to detect the accumulation of local mtDNA diversity to 5,138 +/- 3,633 YBP. Similarly, theY-chromosome gene pool reveals high frequencies of the Near Eastern J1

The Levant versus the Horn of Africa: Evidence for Bidirectional Corridors of Human Migrations
JR LUIS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1182266/
"Paleoanthropological evidence indicates that both the Levantine corridor and the Horn of Africa served, repeatedly, as migratory corridors between Africa and Eurasia. We have begun investigating the roles of these passageways in bidirectional migrations of anatomically modern humans, by analyzing 45 informative biallelic markers as well as 10 microsatellite loci on the nonrecombining region of the Y chromosome (NRY) in 121 and 147 extant males from Oman and northern Egypt, respectively. The present study uncovers three important points concerning these demic movements: (1) The E3b1-M78 and E3b3-M123 lineages, as well as the R1*-M173 lineages, mark gene flow between Egypt and the Levant during the Upper Paleolithic and Mesolithic. (2) In contrast, the Horn of Africa appears to be of minor importance in the human migratory movements between Africa and Eurasia represented by these chromosomes, an observation based on the frequency distributions of E3b*-M35 (no known downstream mutations) and M173. (3) The areal diffusion patterns of G-M201, J-12f2, the derivative M173 haplogroups, and M2 suggest more recent genetic associations between the Middle East and Africa, involving the Levantine corridor and/or Arab slave routes. Affinities to African groups were also evaluated by determining the NRY haplogroup composition in 434 samples from seven sub-Saharan African populations. Oman and Egypt’s NRY frequency distributions appear to be much more similar to those of the Middle East than to any sub-Saharan African population, suggesting a much larger Eurasian genetic component. Finally, the overall phylogeographic profile reveals several clinal patterns and genetic partitions that may indicate source, direction, and relative timing of different waves of dispersals and expansions involving these nine populations."


Genomic Ancestry of North Africans Supports Back-to-Africa Migrations
BrennaHenn
http://www.plosgenetics.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pgen.1002397
The Levant versus the Horn of Africa: Evidence for Bidirectional Corridors of Human Migrations JR LUIS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1182266/
"Paleoanthropological evidence indicates that both the Levantine corridor and the Horn of Africa served, repeatedly, as migratory corridors between Africa and Eurasia. We have begun investigating the roles of these passageways in bidirectional migrations of anatomically modern humans, by analyzing 45 informative biallelic markers as well as 10 microsatellite loci on the nonrecombining region of the Y chromosome (NRY) in 121 and 147 extant males from Oman and northern Egypt, respectively. The present study uncovers three important points concerning these demic movements: (1) The E3b1-M78 and E3b3-M123 lineages, as well as the R1*-M173 lineages, mark gene flow between Egypt and the Levant during the Upper Paleolithic and Mesolithic. (2) In contrast, the Horn of Africa appears to be of minor importance in the human migratory movements between Africa and Eurasia represented by these chromosomes, an observation based on the frequency distributions of E3b*-M35 (no known downstream mutations) and M173. (3) The areal diffusion patterns of G-M201, J-12f2, the derivative M173 haplogroups, and M2 suggest more recent genetic associations between the Middle East and Africa, involving the Levantine corridor and/or Arab slave routes. Affinities to African groups were also evaluated by determining the NRY haplogroup composition in 434 samples from seven sub-Saharan African populations. Oman and Egypt’s NRY frequency distributions appear to be much more similar to those of the Middle East than to any sub-Saharan African population, suggesting a much larger Eurasian genetic component. Finally, the overall phylogeographic profile reveals several clinal patterns and genetic partitions that may indicate source, direction, and relative timing of different waves of dispersals and expansions involving these nine populations."

Brief Communication: Y-Chromosome Haplotypes in Egypt Lucotte
Brief communication: Y-chromosome haplot... [Am J Phys Anthropol. 2003] - PubMed - NCBI
"As for mtDNA (Krings et al., 1999), the present study on the Y-chromosome haplotype shows that there are northern and southern Y-haplotypes in Egypt. The main Y-haplotype V is a northern haplotype, with a significantly different frequency in the north compared to the south of the country: frequencies of haplotype V are 51.9% in the Delta (location A), 24.2% in Upper Egypt (location B), and 17.4% in Lower Nubia (location C). On the other hand, haplotype IV is a typical southern haplotype, being almost absent in A (1.2%), and preponderant in B (27.3%) and C (39.1%). Haplotype XI also shows a preponderance in the south (in C, 30.4%; B, 28.8%) compared to the north (11.7% in A) of the country. In mtDNA, sequences of the first hypervariable HpaI site at position 3592 allowed Krings et al. (1999) to designate each mtDNA as being of northern or southern affiliation, and proportions of northern and southern mtDNA differed significantly between Egypt, Nubia, and the Southern Sudan.
It is interesting to relate this peculiar north/south differentiation, a pattern of genetic variation deriving from the two uniparentally inherited genetic systems (mtDNA and Y chromosome), to specific historic events. Since the beginning of Egyptian history (3200–3100 B.C.), the legendary king Menes united Upper and Lower Egypt. Migration from north to south may coincide with the Pharaonic colonization of Nubia, which occurred initially during the Middle Kingdom (12th Dynasty, 1991–1785 B.C.), and more permanently during the New Kingdom, from the reign of Thotmosis III (1490–1437 B.C.). The main migration from south to north may coincide with the 25th Dynasty (730–655 B.C.), when kings from Napata (in Nubia) conquered Egypt."

"Synthetic maps of Africa". The History and Geography of Human Genes.
Cavalli-Sforza.
http://books.google.com/books?id=FrwNcwKaUKoC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepag e&q&f=false
The gradient is clearly rooted in the relatively ancient presence of Caucasoids in a Northern strip along the Mediterranean and in additions from West Asia, which are visible in the second and third components....the C gene shows a clear North-South gradient, being frequent amongst Caucasoids and almost absent in sub-Sahara Africa. THERE ARE PEAKS IN EGYPT AND IN NORTHWESTERN AFRICA

Y-chromosome analysis in Egypt suggests a genetic regional continuity in northeastern AfricaManni
Y-chromosome analysis in Egypt suggests a genetic r... [Hum Biol. 2002] - PubMed - NCBI
"In conclusion, our analyses have identified a genetic regional continuity between the northeastern part of Africa (Egypt), the Middle East, and southern Europe. In agreement with the ethnohistorical connections between NE Africa and the Middle East, the genetic data confirm that Egypt, occupying an intermediate position along these routes, has been an important contact zone between the three continents."


The emerging tree of West Eurasian mtDNAs: a synthesis of control-region sequences and RFLPs.
Am. J. Hum
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1377722/
We show that the main indigenous North African cluster is a sister group to the most ancient cluster of European mtDNAs, from which it diverged approximately 50,000 years ago.


Mitochondrial DNA structure in North Africa reveals a genetic discontinuity in the Nile
Karima Fadhlaoui-Zid
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajpa.21472/abstract
Human population movements in North Africa have been mostly restricted to an east-west direction due to the geographical barriers imposed by the Sahara Desert and the Mediterranean Sea. Although these barriers have not completely impeded human migrations, genetic studies have shown that an east-west genetic gradient exists. However, the lack of genetic information of certain geographical areas and the focus of some studies in parts of the North African landscape have limited the global view of the genetic pool of North African populations. To provide a global view of the North African genetic landscape and population structure, we have analyzed 2,300 North African mitochondrial DNA lineages (including 269 new sequences from Libya, in the first mtDNA study of the general Libyan population). Our results show a clinal distribution of certain haplogroups, some of them more frequent in Western (H, HV0, L1b, L3b, U6) or Eastern populations (L0a, R0a, N1b, I, J) that might be the result of human migrations from the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, and Europe. Despite this clinal pattern, a genetic discontinuity is found in the Libyan/Egyptian border, suggesting a differential gene flow in the Nile River Valley. Finally, frequency of the post-LGM subclades H1 and H3 is predominant in Libya within the H sequences, highlighting the magnitude of the LGM expansion in North Africa. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.


North African Populations Carry the Signature of Admixture with Neandertals
Federico Sánchez-Quinto
http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0047765
The results of the f4 ancestry ratio test (Table 2 and Table S1) show that North African populations vary in the percentage of Neandertal inferred admixture, primarily depending on the amount of European or Near Eastern ancestry they present (Table 1). Populations like North Morocco and Egypt, with the highest European and Near Eastern component (~40%), have also the highest amount of Neandertal ancestry (~60–70%)....Furthermore, the Neandertal's genetic signal is higher in populations with a local, pre-Neolithic North African ancestry. Therefore, the detected ancient admixture is not due to recent Near Eastern or European migrations.
DNA STUDY PROVING MODERN EGYPTIANS 90% GENETICALLY IDENTICAL TO ANCIENTS:
PROOF Modern Egyptians descend from Ancient Egyptians -


STUDY SHOWING BODY LENGHTS ARE NOT TROPICAL, BUT INTERMEDIATE, AND PROBABLY SO DUE TO PHENOTYPICAL DEVELOPMENT

Egyptian Body Size: A Regional and Worldwide
Michelle H. Raxter
http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/cgi/vi...xter%202011%22
n Ancient Egyptians as a whole generally exhibit intermediate body breadths relative to
higher and lower latitude populations, with Lower Egyptians possessing wider body
breadths, as well as lower brachial and crural indices, compared to Upper Egyptians and
Upper Nubians. This may suggest that Egyptians are closely related to circum-
Mediterranean and/or Near Eastern groups, but quickly developed limb length

STUDIES SHOWING THAT SUB SAHRAN AFRICA DNA- NOT EURASIAN- HAS INCREASED IN MODERN TIMES- SOME ALSO CONTAIN DATA ON EURASIAN DNA

Research on ancient DNA in the Near East
Mateusz Baca
http://www.scribd.com/doc/26068943/Baca-Molak-2008-DNA-Near-East
To obtain the frequencies of these mtDNA types, amplification of the HVRI region and three RFLP markers was conducted. The authors succeeded in analysing RFLP markers in 34 samples and HVRI sequences in 18 of the samples. Both populations, ancient and contemporary, fit the north-south clinal distribution of “southern” and “northern” mtDNA types (Graver et al. 2001). However, significant differences were found between these populations. Based on an increased frequency of HpaI 3592 (+) haplotypes in the contemporary Dakhlehian population, the authors suggested that, since Roman times, gene flow from the Sub-Saharan region has affected gene frequencies of individuals from the oasis.


mtDNA analysis in ancient Nubians supports the existence of gene flow between sub-Sahara and North Africa in the Nile valley
C. Fox, 1997
The Hpal (np3,592) mitochondrial DNA marker is a selectively neutral mutation that is very common in sub-Saharan Africa and is almost absent in North African and European populations. It has been screened in a Meroitic sample from ancient Nubia through PCR amplification and posterior enzyme digestion, to evaluate the sub-Saharan genetic influences in this population. From 29 individuals analysed, only 15 yield positive amplifications, four of them (26·7%) displaying the sub-Saharan African marker. Hpa I (np3,592) marker is present in the sub-Saharan populations at a frequency of 68·7 on average. Thus, the frequency of genes from this area in the Merotic Nubian population can be estimated at around 39% (with a confidence interval from 22% to 55%). The frequency obtained fits in a south-north decreasing gradient of Hpa I (np3,592) along the African continent. Results suggest that morphological changes observed historically in the Nubian populations are more likely to be due to the existence of south-north gene flow through the Nile Valley than to in-situ evolution.
Krings et al study, 1999:
Mitochondrial DNA Research in the Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt
Alison M. GraverMolecular genetic research is being conducted as part of the Dakhleh Oasis Project (DOP), an international and multi-disciplinary research initiative in the western desert of Egypt. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is being analyzed from both ancient human skeletal remains associated with the Roman period town of Kellis (100 to 450 AD) and contemporary inhabitants of the Dakhleh Oasis. The primary objectives of this research are to derive paleogenetic information about the inhabitants of ancient Kellis, and to develop a picture of change over time within this desert oasis. Preliminary mtDNA restriction site data and control region sequence variability suggest significant genetic differences exist between the ancient and modern oasis populations
mtDNA Analysis of Nile River Valley Populations: A Genetic Corridor or a Barrier to Migration?
Krings
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002929707631826
To assess the extent to which the Nile River Valley has been a corridor for human migrations between Egypt and sub-Saharan Africa, we analyzed mtDNA variation in 224 individuals from various locations along the river. Sequences of the first hypervariable segment (HV1) of the mtDNA control region and a polymorphic HpaI site at position 3592 allowed us to designate each mtDNA as being of northern or southern affiliation. Proportions of northern and southern mtDNA differed significantly between Egypt, Nubia, and the southern Sudan. At slowly evolving sites within HV1, northern-mtDNA diversity was highest in Egypt and lowest in the southern Sudan, and southern-mtDNA diversity was highest in the southern Sudan and lowest in Egypt, indicating that migrations had occurred bidirectionally along the Nile River Valley. Egypt and Nubia have low and similar amounts of divergence for both mtDNA types, which is consistent with historical evidence for long-term interactions between Egypt and Nubia. Spatial autocorrelation analysis demonstrates a smooth gradient of decreasing genetic similarity of mtDNA types as geographic distance between sampling localities increases, strongly suggesting gene flow along the Nile, with no evident barriers. We conclude that these migrations probably occurred within the past few hundred to few thousand years and that the migration from north to south was either earlier or lesser in the extent of gene flow than the migration from south to north.

GENETIC STUDIES ON OTHER NORTH AFRICAN Countries PROVING BACK MIGRATION

Mitochondrial DNA transit between West Asia and North Africa inferred from U6 phylogeography
Nicole Maca-Meyer
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2156/4/15
World-wide phylogeographic distribution of human complete mitochondrial DNA sequences suggested a West Asian origin for the autochthonous North African lineage U6. We report here a more detailed analysis of this lineage, unraveling successive expansions that affected not only Africa but neighboring regions such as the Near East, the Iberian Peninsula and the Canary Islands.

A Predominantly Neolithic Origin for Y-Chromosomal DNA Variation in North Africa Arredi
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1216069/
"We have typed 275 men from five populations in Algeria, Tunisia, and Egypt with a set of 119 binary markers and 15 microsatellites from the Y chromosome, and we have analyzed the results together with published data from Moroccan populations. North African Y-chromosomal diversity is geographically structured and fits the pattern expected under an isolation-by-distance model Autocorrelation analyses reveal an east-west cline of genetic variation that extends into the Middle East and is compatible with a hypothesis of demic expansion. This expansion must have involved relatively small numbers of Y chromosomes to account for the reduction in gene diversity towards the West that accompanied the frequency increase of Y haplogroup E3b2, but gene flow must have been maintained to explain the observed pattern of isolation-by-distance. Since the estimates of the times to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCAs) of the most common haplogroups are quite recent, we suggest that the North African pattern of Y-chromosomal variation is largely of Neolithic origin. Thus, we propose that the Neolithic transition in this part of the world was accompanied by demic diffusion of Afro-Asiatic–speaking pastoralists from the Middle East."... that most of the rest fell into haplogroup U6 (Salas et al. 2002), which perhaps originated in the Near East and spread into North Africa ~30 thousand years (KY) ago (KYA)

WHAT DR KEITA ACTUALLY SAYS:

Last edited by cachibatches; January 22nd, 2013 at 03:19 AM.
cachibatches is offline  
Old January 22nd, 2013, 06:28 AM   #10

Irish Yankee's Avatar
Archivist
 
Joined: Jul 2012
From: Penn's Woods
Posts: 138

I was under the impression that the original Egyptian population was scattered after the Muslim conquest?
Irish Yankee is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > Ancient History

Tags
ancient, arabic, egyptian


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
When Did Ancient Egyptian Religion Die? Caracalla Ancient History 24 September 25th, 2012 04:57 AM
Are there any known Ancient Egyptian philosophers? Ashiusx Ancient History 56 July 7th, 2012 06:01 PM
Question about ancient Egyptian Niki86 Ancient History 1 February 8th, 2011 01:38 PM
Ancient Egyptian gods Lucius Ancient History 10 June 17th, 2009 11:29 AM
Ancient Egyptian Warfare Firestorm261 Ancient History 8 March 13th, 2009 01:13 AM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.