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View Poll Results: Which look did you prefer?
The clean shaven men 20 66.67%
The bearded guys 10 33.33%
Voters: 30. You may not vote on this poll

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Old August 23rd, 2014, 03:02 AM   #11
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The early Romans were bearded; in the middle Republic they went clean shaven in imitation of Alexander; Hadrian then popularized the beard; Constantine went clean shaven and re-popularized the look; beards later came back into fashion under Phokas.
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Old August 23rd, 2014, 04:01 AM   #12

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Caesar also plucked his eyebrows and removed most of his body hair.

That's just a little weird, Jules.
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Old August 23rd, 2014, 08:04 AM   #13
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Chose clean shaven as probably I do the same

Also I would think for combat soldiers, having no hair at all would be the best in hand-hand fightings - nothing to grip or pull. Though I think most ancient soldiers had a combo. of all these hairy attributes - long hairs, mustaches, beards etc..., esp. in the east as they were quite often considered symbol of manliness.
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Old August 23rd, 2014, 08:08 AM   #14

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Shaving in ancient Rome was different than it is today. It was an enormous rite of passage for young men. For men of all ages, it was difficult, painful, and - if your 'barber' was unskilled - even dangerous.

Even during periods when beards weren't the fashion, men might grow them as a sign of mourning, or perhaps because they didn't have the means to get them shaved. One can safely that plebians, at least those of the caput censi, were relatively shaggy compared to their 'betters'.

Both military and civilian fashion tended to reflect on trends st by the emperor. From Augustus to Trajan, shortish hair and clean-shaven faces were ideal. From Hadrian to Severus, long, curly hair and luxurious beards were the norm. In the Severan period and 3rd Century, both head hair and facial hair varied in length. It seems like many emperors of the Crisis preferred shorter hair and short full beards - such was the look of my favorite emperor, Aurelian.

When Hadrian first grew out his beard, he initiated a fashion revolution in ancient Rome. Some people think he was trying to hide an ugly scar or facial blemish; others, more dramatically, suggested that he was imitating Greek scholars.

I chose beards. Facial hair is what makes a man a man
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Old August 23rd, 2014, 08:36 AM   #15
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I generally prefer a beard, but for some reason I don't think it suits the Roman Emperors, IMHO. Bearded Romans looked like peasants compared to the ancient Mesopotamian kings or Iranian emperors.

I voted "clean shaven".
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Old August 23rd, 2014, 08:43 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladiatrice View Post
Caesar also plucked his eyebrows and removed most of his body hair.

That's just a little weird, Jules.
I pluck my eyebrows and remove some of my body hair too. Nothing weird about that at all.
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Old August 23rd, 2014, 08:46 AM   #17

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Domitian took it further than Caesar. He removed all of his own bodily hair, and personally removed that of all the women in his life.
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Old August 23rd, 2014, 08:55 AM   #18

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There's a lovely poem by Martial about the hair-plucker in the public baths, loudly screaming as he offered his services - until he found a customer and then the customer would scream.
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Old August 23rd, 2014, 11:21 AM   #19

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Salah View Post
Domitian took it further than Caesar. He removed all of his own bodily hair, and personally removed that of all the women in his life.
Trichotillomania I am assuming. Sometimes cats and dogs have such problems too.
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Old August 23rd, 2014, 11:39 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldSeven View Post
There's a lovely poem by Martial about the hair-plucker in the public baths, loudly screaming as he offered his services - until he found a customer and then the customer would scream.
oo reference? I'm actually not really good with Martial I'm ashamed to admit.

BTW for Romans on hair Juvenal makes a lot of funny comments, esp satires 2 and 8.
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