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-   -   Mona Lisa (http://historum.com/art-cultural-history/11593-mona-lisa.html)

tokarski21 February 25th, 2010 12:12 PM

Mona Lisa
 
The most famous painting in the world, it's also the most copied and parodied. It is said that it has suffered as much from over exposure as it has from damage and deterioration. Here are my thoughts about it:

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-QVhkmjxZo"]YouTube - Lost History - Mona Lisa[/ame]

What are yours?

Solidaire February 26th, 2010 04:02 AM

Re: Mona Lisa
 
Having seen the Mona Lisa at the Louvre, I must say that I was not at all impressed. I can't understand what's all the fuss about this painting. It sure is nice and intriguing, but why is it so famous is beyond me. Of course, I am no expert in painting and I might be terribly wrong, but that's just my personal taste. :)

tokarski21 February 26th, 2010 05:40 AM

Re: Mona Lisa
 
It certainly isn't what it used to be. And 500 years later the artistic innovations and triumphs are lost to us. What I see is the culmination of a man's life work - made to prove to himself and the world what he could do. It's fading, but we can still see it.

HadleyH March 18th, 2010 05:49 PM

Re: Mona Lisa
 
Just a note aside, Leonardo da Vinci painted only four female portraits, one of them being the Mona Lisa of course. I personally like this other one Leonardo did even better, even though is not so famous! :)

Cecilia Gallerani (1473-1536) italian noble woman.

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g2...o-da-vinci.jpg

okamido March 18th, 2010 05:53 PM

Re: Mona Lisa
 
Is it a weasel she is holding?

Cicero March 18th, 2010 05:55 PM

Re: Mona Lisa
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by okamido (Post 226752)
Is it a weasel she is holding?

Or a ferret!

Carlisle Blues March 18th, 2010 06:00 PM

Re: Mona Lisa
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Cicero (Post 226755)
Or a ferret!


Ermine :p

Cecilia, chronologically the second to be painted, is surely the most beautiful of the three. She was neither a wife nor a betrothed, but the mistress of the Duke Lodovico Sforza. She's not yet twenty, older than Ginevra, probably younger than Lisa at the times they were painted. Cecilia has been caught in a moment when her attention was diverted by something off to her left; the ermine she holds looks in the same direction.

tjadams March 18th, 2010 07:23 PM

Re: Mona Lisa
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by HadleyH (Post 226746)
Cecilia Gallerani (1473-1536) italian noble woman.

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g2...o-da-vinci.jpg

Seems this young lady beat Paris Hilton and the small dog craze by a few hundred years.

daftone March 18th, 2010 10:27 PM

Re: Mona Lisa
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Solidaire (Post 210783)
Having seen the Mona Lisa at the Louvre, I must say that I was not at all impressed. I can't understand what's all the fuss about this painting. It sure is nice and intriguing, but why is it so famous is beyond me. Of course, I am no expert in painting and I might be terribly wrong, but that's just my personal taste. :)

I think it has to do with the mystery behind it. First it was painted by Davinici so its worth a lot. Then they say he worked on it for a long time to perfect it. Some even suggest its a self portrait of him as a women. Then their something about the light effects and the background sizes and other stuff that only artists understand that make it a masterpiece.

Then again someone throws some paint randomly at a canvas and it sells for millions. I could get a monkey at a zoo to do the same thing.

violet March 29th, 2010 09:15 PM

Re: Mona Lisa
 
It has to do with the way Da Vinci rendered the skin tone as well as the monumentality of the figure against the landscape. During that period, this was not so common, so he was seen as an innovative artist. Mona Lisa is in our space, as though she is in the room with us, and the lighting only accentuates her gaze at the viewer, particularly her smile, which seems at some points there, and at other points to disappear. She seems alluring, but then she also seems distant...

This has to do with the lighting and shading...from what I recall, its called the sfumato technique. This also contributes to the fact that you never really know what time of day it is in Leonardo's portraits.

Quite a work out for our eyeballs and brains....

With that being said, I'm not all that crazy about the Mona Lisa either lol


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