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-   -   Impact of Woodstock ('69) on American Culture. (http://historum.com/art-cultural-history/11664-impact-woodstock-69-american-culture.html)

DAS44 February 28th, 2010 08:58 AM

Impact of Woodstock ('69) on American Culture.
 
Woodstock, the famous festival in wich, Jimi Hendrix, Big Brother and the Holding Company, Crosby Stills and Nash; Santana and many more artists played. It's popular "catch phrase" (if you will) was "Three days of peace and music". It delivered on the peace and music but add drugs and alchohol and you're there. Fantastic music all around.

The support for peace obviously refers to the Veitnam War but does this message go deeper? To the bonds of friendship formed in the mud in little Bethel NY? To the ability to come together are provide for everyone? (even the 500K hippies who were basically starving). Those two and more.

It's effect on music of the day has reached to today (despite the gruesome monster that the disney channel, rap and much popular music these days has become). The few bands that I personally like are all strongly influenced by the seed layed at woodstock. The far reaching influence of that generation, those musicians were some of the most innovative of all time.

Too many teens today forget those days. Being 15 and having the music taste that I do, it sickens me that many kids I know havent heard of Jimi Hendrix or Janis Joplin.

I pray that music makes a comeback.

diddyriddick March 1st, 2010 07:04 AM

Re: Impact of Woodstock ('69) on American Culture.
 
While I agree with your musical choices, DAS, beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

DwnSouthJukin March 1st, 2010 09:37 AM

Re: Impact of Woodstock ('69) on American Culture.
 
Lots of good music, lots of naive outlooks on the world.

Sharks and love March 1st, 2010 09:47 AM

Re: Impact of Woodstock ('69) on American Culture.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by DwnSouthJukin (Post 213419)
Lots of good music, lots of naive outlooks on the world.

Which outlooks were naive?

JimR-OCDS March 1st, 2010 10:03 AM

Re: Impact of Woodstock ('69) on American Culture.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sharks and love (Post 213431)
Which outlooks were naive?

That sexual liberation would be good for society.

That dropping out and tuning out was a good way to earn a living.

That science was something to be distrusted. Heck when it started to rain during the WS concert, there were many who claimed that the government had seeded the clouds in order to spoil the event. :rolleyes:

I was 16 at the time of Woodstock. I new a couple kids that went. All came back dumber than when they left.

That being said, I like the music, but the music actually preceded the concert.

Jim

Sharks and love March 1st, 2010 10:09 AM

Re: Impact of Woodstock ('69) on American Culture.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JimR-OCDS (Post 213442)
That sexual liberation would be good for society.

So are you saying sexual liberation is a bad thing? Why?

Quote:

That dropping out and tuning out was a good way to earn a living.
Who said such a thing?

Quote:

That science was something to be distrusted.
Excuse me for my ignorance but I've never heard such a thing. Can you show me where this comes from?

JimR-OCDS March 1st, 2010 10:42 AM

Re: Impact of Woodstock ('69) on American Culture.
 
Sharks and love;

Quote:

So are you saying sexual liberation is a bad thing? Why?

Based on the number of children who are raised in homes with no fathers and who learned that they way to survive is to get on wel-fare, I'd say its a bad thing.


Quote:

Who said such a thing?
It was the theme of the 60's.



Quote:

Excuse me for my ignorance but I've never heard such a thing. Can you show me where this comes from?
They distrusted anything science reported back then. Science was seen in cahouts with big business and therefore, not to be trusted.

Even aspirin was suspect.

I suppose skepticism was really the main ideology of the 60's generation, my generation BTW.

Jim

Sharks and love March 1st, 2010 10:47 AM

Re: Impact of Woodstock ('69) on American Culture.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JimR-OCDS (Post 213501)
Based on the number of children who are raised in homes with no fathers and who learned that they way to survive is to get on wel-fare, I'd say its a bad thing.

What? How is that attributable to sexual liberation? And can you say with certainty that this is only attributable to sexual liberation?

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimR-OCDS (Post 213501)
They distrusted anything science reported back then. Science was seen in cahouts with big business and therefore, not to be trusted.

Even aspirin was suspect.

You know that aspirin can be very dangerous don't you?

It can cause stomach bleeding and all kinds of other unhealthy side effects.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspirin#Adverse_effects


There have been quite a few studies (even big ones that the government cited for policy) from the 60's and 70's that have since been debunked and proven wrong.

JimR-OCDS March 1st, 2010 11:21 AM

Re: Impact of Woodstock ('69) on American Culture.
 
Sharks and love;

Quote:

What? How is that attributable to sexual liberation? And can you say with certainty that this is only attributable to sexual liberation?
Because prior to the 60's, most people especially girls, waited until they were married to have sex. However, the 60's brought a level of promiscuity which open the flood gates of un-wed mothers, who had to live off the public dime while trying raise kids by themselves. Don't misunderstand me here. Many single mothers do a fantastic job raising their kids. However, in general, a child does better with both a mother and father.

Quote:

You know that aspirin can be very dangerous don't you?
For babies and people with bleeding issues it can be.. However, aspirin is very beneficial if used properly. People my age are recommended to take a baby aspirin everyday. Its good for the heart. Also, it works great in reducing a fever.

However, that's not the point, but rather suspicion of science in general.


Jim

sylla1 March 1st, 2010 11:54 AM

Re: Impact of Woodstock ('69) on American Culture.
 
As reported by the CDC, the trend of births from unmarried women (defined as the number of births to unmarried women per 1,000 unmarried women aged 15–44 years) would not suggest a relevant contribution from the sexual liberation of the 1960s (SIC):

"From 1940 to 1957, the rate nearly tripled, from 7.1 to 21.0 per 1,000. Over the next 13 years, the rate generally increased, slowly at first and then more rapidly from 1966 to 1970.
However, from 1970 to 1976 the rate declined nearly every year, about 8 percent overall.
Beginning in 1976, the rate increased without interruption until 1991. The pace of increase was especially rapid from 1985 to 1990 (5–8 percent annually).
In 1991, the rate increased 3 percent to 45.2 per 1,000 where it remained in 1992 as well."


My source: http://cdc.gov/NCHS/data/series/sr_21/sr21_053.pdf.


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