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Old August 25th, 2016, 08:11 PM   #11

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Originally Posted by Solidaire View Post
In addition to the above, there are also certain composers who have written some of the most memorable pieces of all time, but personally I wouldn't place them in the standing of the above for their overall work.

For example, Shostakovich's 2nd Waltz, Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsodies (particularly no.2), Brahms' Hungarian Dances (especially no.5), Ivanovici's Waves of the Danube, Satie's Gnossienne no.1, and many many more, are masterpieces that should not be omitted.
Dmitri Shostakovich's Second Waltz I have heard this one before I just didn't know what it was. As far as a waltz goes it is good but far from the epic stuff that I like most. Comparable to the Johann Strauss father and son waltzes and marches but this one seems a bit more complex like the Blue Danube. Very nice. I don't dance though.

Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsodies I started off with the piano version as he was apparently a pianist and found it really slow. Tried the orchestra instead and it was a marked improvement for my ears. I liked number 2. I was familiar with the last part of this as well I just didn't know what it was.

Johannes Brahms Hungarian Dances. Good too, more lively and exciting how I like it especially number 5 but less chaotic than the ending of Lizst's Hungarian Rhapsody number 2. I'm not sure but I may have heard this one before. It sounds structurally similar to Shostakovich's second waltz in my opinion.

Iosif Ivanovici's Waves of the Danube. Very nice over all. Good use of pacing and instruments especially the progressive build up. Very soft and formal I would describe it. I'm not a huge music buff so I suck at terminology.

Erik Satie's Gnossienne number 1. Again I seem to have a problem with the Piano being very slow. Not that bad but it makes me sleepy, calms the nerves a little too much. I like the composition of this piece though. It is good but not my favourite one of the list.

Tried some Chopin. I like his Piano more as it is more complex and exciting it seems. Started with Etude Opus 25 and it was actually pretty good. He also employed some good buildup so there is a big exciting pay off the more you progress.
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Old August 25th, 2016, 08:20 PM   #12

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On composer I just love is Yoko Kanno. This woman can do just about anything. Whether it is Jazz, Classical and orchestral or even Rock she hits her mark. I've yet to notice an exception. This score from Nobunaga's Ambition is just amazing.







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Old August 26th, 2016, 04:23 AM   #13

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Originally Posted by Lord Oda Nobunaga View Post
Dmitri Shostakovich's Second Waltz I have heard this one before I just didn't know what it was. As far as a waltz goes it is good but far from the epic stuff that I like most. Comparable to the Johann Strauss father and son waltzes and marches but this one seems a bit more complex like the Blue Danube. Very nice. I don't dance though.

Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsodies I started off with the piano version as he was apparently a pianist and found it really slow. Tried the orchestra instead and it was a marked improvement for my ears. I liked number 2. I was familiar with the last part of this as well I just didn't know what it was.

Johannes Brahms Hungarian Dances. Good too, more lively and exciting how I like it especially number 5 but less chaotic than the ending of Lizst's Hungarian Rhapsody number 2. I'm not sure but I may have heard this one before. It sounds structurally similar to Shostakovich's second waltz in my opinion.

Iosif Ivanovici's Waves of the Danube. Very nice over all. Good use of pacing and instruments especially the progressive build up. Very soft and formal I would describe it. I'm not a huge music buff so I suck at terminology.

Erik Satie's Gnossienne number 1. Again I seem to have a problem with the Piano being very slow. Not that bad but it makes me sleepy, calms the nerves a little too much. I like the composition of this piece though. It is good but not my favourite one of the list.

Tried some Chopin. I like his Piano more as it is more complex and exciting it seems. Started with Etude Opus 25 and it was actually pretty good. He also employed some good buildup so there is a big exciting pay off the more you progress.
Thanks for the critical response, I agree with your assessments. Personally, I tend to favour esoteric or lyric music more than epic one, it's all very subjective and depends on the mood. Chopin, for example, goes very well with rainy, moody days, or with the melancholy of quiet nights. I can't listen to him in the midst of daily activities. I prefer Bach as a background music for work, for some reason he uplifts my spirit, calms nerves and gives a good pace.

I have a few more listening suggestions coming to mind at the moment, mainly violin pieces.

Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto in E Minor (1st. movement), considered by many the greatest German violin concerto.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJUQD6Rr2M8

Vivaldi's Summer, to me the most climactic piece of classical music.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g65oWFMSoK0

Dvorak's Slavonic Dance no.7
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTvr9HAqwIE

And three Bach violin pieces, Violin Concerto in A Minor BWV 1041, 1st movement
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vgfPdeQmuc

3rd movement
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=It-9AYFFPhU

and Concerto No.2 for Violin and Strings (BWV 1042): 1st movement
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udGnytDWBbI
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Old August 26th, 2016, 11:43 AM   #14

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J.S. Bach hands down
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Old August 26th, 2016, 12:08 PM   #15

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I've listened to classical music all my life so will weigh in with my thoughts.

J.S. Bach--greatest of the Baroque Composers
Handel--second best

The pure classical composers:

Joseph Haydn--everything he wrote
W. A. Mozart--at his best as an opera composer Don Giovanni probably the greatest opera ever written.
Ludwig von Beethoven-- IMO there is no greater composer of any era than Beethoven. Give a listen to his Third ("Eroica") Symphony and his Fifth Piano Concerto. Totally opposite of Haydn and Mozart in his composing style--Haydn wrote over 100 symphonies and Mozart nearly 30; Beethoven but nine. I have a book purporting to name the top 100 classical orchestral pieces; all nine of Beethoven's symphonies and three of his five piano concertos made it.

Some of those I like in the 19th C: Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Brahms, Wagner, Dvorak. Wagner as an operatic composer--listen to Tristan und Isolde for some of the most ravishing vocal ever written.

Igor Stravinsky, the most important 20th C. composer. His ballets--particularly The Rite of Spring and The Firebird.

Richard Strauss, Bela Bartok in the 20th C.

Phillip Glass, John Adams are more contemporary.
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Old August 26th, 2016, 01:16 PM   #16

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Solidaire View Post
Thanks for the critical response, I agree with your assessments. Personally, I tend to favour esoteric or lyric music more than epic one, it's all very subjective and depends on the mood. Chopin, for example, goes very well with rainy, moody days, or with the melancholy of quiet nights. I can't listen to him in the midst of daily activities. I prefer Bach as a background music for work, for some reason he uplifts my spirit, calms nerves and gives a good pace.

I have a few more listening suggestions coming to mind at the moment, mainly violin pieces.

Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto in E Minor (1st. movement), considered by many the greatest German violin concerto.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJUQD6Rr2M8

Vivaldi's Summer, to me the most climactic piece of classical music.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g65oWFMSoK0

Dvorak's Slavonic Dance no.7
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTvr9HAqwIE

And three Bach violin pieces, Violin Concerto in A Minor BWV 1041, 1st movement
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vgfPdeQmuc

3rd movement
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=It-9AYFFPhU

and Concerto No.2 for Violin and Strings (BWV 1042): 1st movement
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udGnytDWBbI
All of those were exceptionally good. As for Dvorak there is nothing from his I don't like. The Vivaldi as well, I have heard enough for me to enjoy his work. That bit from the Summer one was sublime. I think I quite prefer the violin to piano given these pieces. Though for the piano it really depends, I could like a piano piece just as much.
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Old August 26th, 2016, 01:40 PM   #17

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Greatest composer of all time? Not sure there can be one. Favourite composer? That's easier to answer.

When younger, I think I listened to Shostakovich most days. Then I listened to more contemporary composers like Alfred Schnittke, Arvo Part (his earlier music), James MacMillan (Scottish), Luciano Berio.

Nowadays, I can honestly say that I listen to something by Chopin every day. For a man of his physical weakness and emotional disposition, he knew how to make a piano really sing. Play Chopin correctly and it is a song. Every piece. The Ballades (esp. nos 1 & 4), the Nocturnes, the Waltzes, the wonderfull harmonically complex Barcarolle, the entertaining Études, the picturesque Preludes, the Polonaisen and the often quirky Mazurkas. Each piece, whatever the nature or size is a song without words.



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Old August 26th, 2016, 01:42 PM   #18

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Forgot I started this thread.

Baroque: Bach, Handel, and Vivaldi are musts for this period. Telemann probably deserves a mention too.

Classical: Mozart, Beethoven, and Haydn are the big three of the Classical period. Schubert more than anyone exemplifies the bridge between Classical and Romantic.

Romantic: quite a lot of standouts: Tchaikovsky, the Schumanns, Chopin, Brahms, Mendelssohn, and Rimsky-Korsakov to name a few. The great opera composers Verdi and Wagner also fit in Romanticism.

Modern: I'm not too familiar entirely with this period, but Stravinsky and Gustav Holst are personal favorites from the era.
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Old August 26th, 2016, 02:30 PM   #19

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I'm surprised no one has mentioned Felix Mendelssohn.
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Old August 26th, 2016, 02:32 PM   #20

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Quote:
Originally Posted by avon View Post
Nowadays, I can honestly say that I listen to something by Chopin every day. For a man of his physical weakness and emotional disposition, he knew how to make a piano really sing. Play Chopin correctly and it is a song. Every piece. The Ballades (esp. nos 1 & 4), the Nocturnes, the Waltzes, the wonderfull harmonically complex Barcarolle, the entertaining Études, the picturesque Preludes, the Polonaisen and the often quirky Mazurkas. Each piece, whatever the nature or size is a song without words.
I must admit I have developed a similar addiction to Chopin this last year. Never thought much of his music before (I was considering it too slow for my tastes, and I was never a great fan of piano anyway), but when I finally sat down to listen to him I got stuck with several of his melodies, couldn't get them out of my mind. Ever since, he often accompanies my quiet late night hours.

PS: Welcome back, by the way. Was it the classical music thread that lured you back?
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