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Old November 17th, 2016, 06:53 PM   #1

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The Early 1980s of the Cold War







You can feel the gloomy mood of that time.
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Old December 11th, 2016, 07:26 PM   #2
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But you're Cherry Picking, my friend.

I could just as easily post a dozen "feel good" high-energy rock and roll tunes, as well as nationalist anthems like those of Bruce Springsteen and Huey Lewis and all those wonderful Glam Rock Hair bands.

You know...all those "non-emo" bands like the ones you chose.

Myself, I sorta miss the Cold War. You knew who your enemy was. Not like today, when God knows which wackjob raghead group of wild-eyed pistol waver who ain't afraid to die (apologies to Don Henley) are gonna create the next terrorist act.
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Old December 12th, 2016, 12:38 PM   #3

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Ahhh.... Nena.
Men of a certain age on this site know EXACTLY what I mean.

Yossarian is right of course, the 1980s had plenty of happy music, even at the start.
And don't forget, the decade spawned Rick Astley, who came to fame in the UK two years before the Berlin wall fell.
Coincidence?
I'll let you decide; via the magic of YouTube -



It's what the Internet was invented for!

Last edited by OccamsRazor; December 12th, 2016 at 12:40 PM.
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Old December 13th, 2016, 02:51 AM   #4

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I lived through it. I was studying at a university through the first part of the 1980s. There was not an overwhelming gloominess on campus. Some were too busy studying. Some were too busying partying. To be honest, where I lived there was more gloominess over the collapse of the steel industry, than the Cold War battle. Also, keep in mind, communications was not like it is today. There was no internet to speak of. Nobody carried devices that sent information to them instantaneously. There was no social media. You had the local news for a 1/2 hour or hour, then the national news for a 1/2 hour. You had newspapers and magazines. The point is, you had to actively search for news. If you wished, you could ignore the news. I don't think the average person spent much time dwelling on the Cold War, at least in the U.S. Some of these videos you posted might have been in reaction to the battle going on bewteen the U.S. and USSR, propaganda of sorts, because there were plenty who thought it wrong to escalate the arms race.

Last edited by Rodger; December 13th, 2016 at 02:55 AM.
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Old December 13th, 2016, 01:38 PM   #5

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodger View Post
I lived through it. I was studying at a university through the first part of the 1980s. There was not an overwhelming gloominess on campus. Some were too busy studying. Some were too busying partying. To be honest, where I lived there was more gloominess over the collapse of the steel industry, than the Cold War battle. Also, keep in mind, communications was not like it is today. There was no internet to speak of. Nobody carried devices that sent information to them instantaneously. There was no social media. You had the local news for a 1/2 hour or hour, then the national news for a 1/2 hour. You had newspapers and magazines. The point is, you had to actively search for news. If you wished, you could ignore the news. I don't think the average person spent much time dwelling on the Cold War, at least in the U.S. Some of these videos you posted might have been in reaction to the battle going on bewteen the U.S. and USSR, propaganda of sorts, because there were plenty who thought it wrong to escalate the arms race.
And this was basically how we all viewed the threat of Nuclear Armageddon; we all just got on with our lives.
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Old December 14th, 2016, 08:26 PM   #6

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The fear was there where I lived. Everyone I knew talked about The Day After. Of course there were "feel good" music at that time also.

By the time this music got released...



...people were already forgetting about The Day After and this news debate...



By the time of this music...



...people were feeling safer after seeing nothing like The Day After happening.
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Old December 17th, 2016, 06:32 AM   #7

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue View Post
The fear was there where I lived. Everyone I knew talked about The Day After. Of course there were "feel good" music at that time also.

By the time this music got released...



...people were already forgetting about The Day After and this news debate...



By the time of this music...



...people were feeling safer after seeing nothing like The Day After happening.
Yeah, I think it was always an ever present thing, but there were always plenty of other tangible things to worry about, like the rampant inflation in the 70's, mass unemployment, what to wear for your date, passing exams, leaky radiators and your car breaking down, for example.
It doesn't mean we ignored the threat of nuclear annihilation, it was just something else to be aware of.

And full marks for Rick-rolling!
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Old December 17th, 2016, 12:00 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OccamsRazor View Post
Yeah, I think it was always an ever present thing, but there were always plenty of other tangible things to worry about, like the rampant inflation in the 70's, mass unemployment, what to wear for your date, passing exams, leaky radiators and your car breaking down, for example.
It doesn't mean we ignored the threat of nuclear annihilation, it was just something else to be aware of.

And full marks for Rick-rolling!
Yeah, you could always easily forget about the Cold War; other than brief periods of increased tension, some morbid drama on tv about the consequences of nuclear war, or the occasional doom-monger one met in the street.

edit: Plus Nena and her red balloons!
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