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Old April 5th, 2017, 06:30 PM   #1

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History of Sport


I'm double posting this from the American History section
because I think there might be people who are not interested
in that, but might be interested in the topic


A thread dedicated to sport history.
Feel free to post anything on that topic,
but I had a few questions I would be
interested in seeing other's input on.

Ike played American football at West Point and
injured his knee tackling Jim Thorpe,
one of the greatest players of his era.
Source: 2/1/16 New Yorker p. 15

Are there other sports stories of people
who aren't famous for their sporting
career such as Ike?

Around 1950, IIRC the most popular sports
in the US were Boxing, Horse Racing, Baseball,
and college football.

Today I believe they are Football, Basketball,
Baseball, and Ice Hockey. It seems that the
US popularity went from more individualized
sports to team sports.

In the rest of US culture it seems that the
US has become more individualistic since
1950. Do you think the greater popularity
of team sports today is a reaction against
the rest of US culture?

Are other countries less individualistic and
like individualistic sports more than the US?


It seems the US has a rather unique culture
in that people here don't really care about
international sports, except for sports that
people don't care about.

E.g. the Olympics draws a lot of attention to
sports that people don't usually care about.
An event like the World Baseball Classic,
which does involve a sport that people normally
care about doesn't seem as popular.

Would you agree? If so, why do you think
this is?


I read someone say that the 1987 Canada Cup
Ice Hockey Canada-USSR final was the greatest
international sports series ever. (2 or more games).

Agree or Disagree?
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Old April 5th, 2017, 06:55 PM   #2

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George Patton finished 5th in the modern pentathlon in the 1912 Olympics.
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Old April 8th, 2017, 07:25 AM   #3

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USA doesn't really play many globally noted sports at a high level though. OK, football (soccer) is an exception at both women's and men's level, as is athletics.

My point is how most modern sports emerged. Football clearly comes from medieval ball games, and boxing has existed for centuries in some form before the Queensbury rules. Seems most modern sports are an evolution of a theme, tennis, even F1, since there were horse and chariot racing before (same concept).
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Old April 8th, 2017, 08:19 AM   #4

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SOTG View Post
Around 1950, IIRC the most popular sports
in the US were Boxing, Horse Racing, Baseball,
and college football.

Today I believe they are Football, Basketball,
Baseball, and Ice Hockey. It seems that the
US popularity went from more individualized
sports to team sports.

In the rest of US culture it seems that the
US has become more individualistic since
1950. Do you think the greater popularity
of team sports today is a reaction against
the rest of US culture?
I think there is some credence to this. I believe it parallels a movement in American society in general.
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Old April 9th, 2017, 03:06 PM   #5

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Quote:
Originally Posted by notgivenaway View Post
USA doesn't really play many globally noted sports at a high level though. OK, football (soccer) is an exception at both women's and men's level, as is athletics.

My point is how most modern sports emerged. Football clearly comes from medieval ball games, and boxing has existed for centuries in some form before the Queensbury rules. Seems most modern sports are an evolution of a theme, tennis, even F1, since there were horse and chariot racing before (same concept).
What are "globally noted sports"? I believe football (soccer) is #1 in
the world, then basketball. In basketball, the US is very high level.
I'm not saying I disagree with you, but am interested in what are
the other popular sports that the US is not at a high level in.

I'm not exactly sure what the 2nd paragraph in the quote above adresses.
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Old April 11th, 2017, 10:33 AM   #6

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Interesting thread.

Both George H.W. Bush (baseball) and Charles Ives (American football) were varsity athletes at Yale University.

Your overall thesis is interesting. I recall reading during the Cold War the paradox that individual sports were big among in the "collectivist" USSR while group sports were more popular among the "independent" citizens of the US. Maybe US society is becoming more individualistic today as group sports become bigger?
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Old April 11th, 2017, 10:51 AM   #7
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Cricket, the only sport I care about.

It was already an established sport by early 1700s in southeast England. Why is it so that it is no longer popular in the North American colonies of Britain? Apparently, first international match was held in North America between Canada and England in 1850s. I think that the actual history of Cricket as a truly international game starts in the late 1870s with English tour of Australia and the beginning of the tradition of The Ashes.
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Old April 12th, 2017, 07:25 AM   #8

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bhrigu View Post
Cricket, the only sport I care about.

It was already an established sport by early 1700s in southeast England. Why is it so that it is no longer popular in the North American colonies of Britain? Apparently, first international match was held in North America between Canada and England in 1850s. I think that the actual history of Cricket as a truly international game starts in the late 1870s with English tour of Australia and the beginning of the tradition of The Ashes.
Bhrigu--that is a great question that I'd never thought of! Cricket, as far as I am aware, is more or less invisible in the US and has always been. It may be because of the amount of time a match takes--we want something that is concluded in three hours max.

I have seen some cricket players in a public park here in Atlanta, Georgia, within the last year--a first.
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Old April 12th, 2017, 08:31 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Vagamundo View Post
Bhrigu--that is a great question that I'd never thought of! Cricket, as far as I am aware, is more or less invisible in the US and has always been. It may be because of the amount of time a match takes--we want something that is concluded in three hours max.

I have seen some cricket players in a public park here in Atlanta, Georgia, within the last year--a first.
Yes, Cricket is indeed a very time-consuming game (which I consider a part of its charm), but why is it so that out of all countries it is only in North America that Cricket is almost invisible? Cricket is a major sport in nearly all countries of the former British Empire, such as Australia, West Indies, India, Zimbabwe, South Africa, New Zealand, etc. I have heard from some people that Cricket was seen as too British a sport and as a result did not gain popularity due to the anti-British sentiment cultivated during the American Revolution and the War of 1812 in the U.S.; however, this does not explain why it is not popular in Canada which was a part of the British Empire until much later.
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Old April 14th, 2017, 07:51 PM   #10
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I think even though sports is a team effort, individuals all the way is the main concern why people excel in a sport. Recognition, competition, reward, culture, and to some degree sports anywhere is laced with a belief of some sort and in part attributes religion as its basis for someone to excel in sports competition. This is providing the person is not big and cannot compete, but instead relies on all aspects of culture to sustain his or her drive to continued excellence.
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