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Old July 8th, 2017, 01:17 AM   #1
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The greatest Flemish artists


Flanders has a long, magnificent tradition of painting: all types of subjects, from religious scenes to mythological allegories, historical canvases, fabulously beautiful portraits...Flemish art is one of the most exuberant in the world (just think of Peter Paul Rubens!), one of the most skilled in brilliant chromatic effects. It was an essentially internal development, although there was some Italian and French influence; but Italy and France borrowed much more from Flemish styles and techniques than they gave.

Who are your favourite Flemish artists?
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Old July 8th, 2017, 02:02 PM   #2

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Now that's a very difficult choice to make.

I think I will remain with Bosch, afterall.

Hieronymus Van Haken (his real name), born at S'Hertogenbosch, started to sign his paintings as "Bosch" (forest in English), to distinguish from his father and grandfather (it seems).

There's such a sparkling imagination and such a freedom in that imagination that it makes me come back to him again and again.

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old July 9th, 2017, 04:23 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deaf tuner View Post
Now that's a very difficult choice to make.

I think I will remain with Bosch, afterall.

Hieronymus Van Haken (his real name), born at S'Hertogenbosch, started to sign his paintings as "Bosch" (forest in English), to distinguish from his father and grandfather (it seems).

There's such a sparkling imagination and such a freedom in that imagination that it makes me come back to him again and again.

Click the image to open in full size.
Imagination, fantasy, mystery...A very unique world, beyond place and time, in which every beholder discovers something special: something he has always dreamed of finding.

That, I think, is the magic of Bosch.

Did he have any true followers, or imitators? Brueghel, perhaps, is closest to Bosch's spirit?
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Old July 9th, 2017, 04:58 AM   #4

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Deaf are you flemishwashing history? Bosch is Dutch

Old Brueghel seems to have been a follower see his Dulle Griet
Click the image to open in full size.

as has Lucas van Leyden

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old July 9th, 2017, 05:26 AM   #5
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I am extremely confused now. Hieronymous Bosch was born in Brabant...But which Brabant? There is a Flemish one and a Dutch one; complicating the matter even more is the fact that the name "Brabant" has referred to different political/geographical entities at different times: Landgraviate of Brabant, Duchy of Brabant, South Brabant, Province of Brabant, North Brabant Province, Flemish Brabant, Walloon Brabant, Klein-Brabant...

Help! Where was Bosch born?

Please clarify this for me.

Thanks.
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Old July 9th, 2017, 06:02 AM   #6
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Well, Hertorgenbosch is in Dutch North Brabant and Wiki says that he was Dutch. That's why I put him into Dutch painters theme.
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Old July 9th, 2017, 08:19 AM   #7

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willempie View Post
Deaf are you flemishwashing history? Bosch is Dutch
And here it goes again, the Dutch …

More seriously, Your remark surprised me, then I understood. It's simply a question of terminology.

"Flemish painting", "Flemish primitives", is something that it was used (and sometimes still used) to designate that artistic movements. Funny, it's less the Flemish flemishwashing flamengants using it, but French speaking (amongst others) literature using the term "Flemish" as it covers a cultural continuum (that goes from extreme East of what is today Holland to Dunkirk) a continuum that existed and is existing, inspite of the statal/territorial evolutions.


reitia's question on Brabant: there is one Brabant. Later, it was divided, re-devided, aso. In other words, he was born in Brabant, the part of Brabant that now is in Holland. (There are plenty of historical regions that were divided between states all over Europe. Limburg: Holland-Belgian-German, Picardie Belgian - French, aso, aso, aso…)

Edit: @ reitia, (and others that might read Italian)

Wiki's page on the Flemish painting presents very well this "Flemish vs Dutch" aspect. https://it.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pittura_fiamminga

Last edited by deaf tuner; July 9th, 2017 at 08:58 AM.
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Old July 9th, 2017, 10:25 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deaf tuner View Post
And here it goes again, the Dutch …

More seriously, Your remark surprised me, then I understood. It's simply a question of terminology.

"Flemish painting", "Flemish primitives", is something that it was used (and sometimes still used) to designate that artistic movements. Funny, it's less the Flemish flemishwashing flamengants using it, but French speaking (amongst others) literature using the term "Flemish" as it covers a cultural continuum (that goes from extreme East of what is today Holland to Dunkirk) a continuum that existed and is existing, inspite of the statal/territorial evolutions.


reitia's question on Brabant: there is one Brabant. Later, it was divided, re-devided, aso. In other words, he was born in Brabant, the part of Brabant that now is in Holland. (There are plenty of historical regions that were divided between states all over Europe. Limburg: Holland-Belgian-German, Picardie Belgian - French, aso, aso, aso…)

Edit: @ reitia, (and others that might read Italian)

Wiki's page on the Flemish painting presents very well this "Flemish vs Dutch" aspect. https://it.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pittura_fiamminga
I'll surely take a look at this link.

Just one question, deaf tuner. You say that Bosch was born in the part of Brabant that NOW is in Holland. Does that mean that, at the time of Bosch's birth, that part of Brabant was NOT in Holland? Politically, did it belong to Flanders then, or to some other territory?

The Wikipedia article on Brabant which I read was not at all clear on this point.
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Old July 9th, 2017, 11:27 AM   #9

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Quote:
Originally Posted by reitia View Post
I'll surely take a look at this link.

Just one question, deaf tuner. You say that Bosch was born in the part of Brabant that NOW is in Holland. Does that mean that, at the time of Bosch's birth, that part of Brabant was NOT in Holland? Politically, did it belong to Flanders then, or to some other territory?

The Wikipedia article on Brabant which I read was not at all clear on this point.
Brabant was a Duchy, and in Bosch's time was part of the Burgundy. A bit later, it passed (through heritage) to the House of Hapsburg.

Click the image to open in full size.

The Burgundian period is important for all the Low Countries, as there was a strong centralised power that in the same time allowed a fair amount of local autonomies. It permitted an economic "boom", and indirectly, an artistic and philosophic one.

From this comes also one of the differences between the Italian and Low Countries Renaissance. Low Countries artists enjoyed the richness of the region, but unlike Italian ones, that usually were sustained by mecena, they were on their own. Freelancers, if You want. So You have magnificent painters as Vermeer, quit poor, as You have extremely rich ones, like Rembrandt.
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Old July 9th, 2017, 11:31 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deaf tuner View Post
Brabant was a Duchy, and in Bosch's time was part of the Burgundy. A bit later, it passed (through heritage) to the House of Hapsburg.

Click the image to open in full size.

The Burgundian period is important for all the Low Countries, as there was a strong centralised power that in the same time allowed a fair amount of local autonomies. It permitted an economic "boom", and indirectly, an artistic and philosophic one.

From this comes also one of the differences between the Italian and Low Countries Renaissance. Low Countries artists enjoyed the richness of the region, but unlike Italian ones, that usually were sustained by mecena, they were on their own. Freelancers, if You want. So You have magnificent painters as Vermeer, quit poor, as You have extremely rich ones, like Rembrandt.
Thanks for this info and for the lovely map.
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