Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > Themes in History > Art and Cultural History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

Art and Cultural History Art and Cultural History Forum - Music, Literature, Mythology, Visual Arts, Sports, Popular Culture


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old October 14th, 2017, 06:05 AM   #21

Rodger's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jun 2014
From: US
Posts: 3,477

Quote:
Originally Posted by notgivenaway View Post
I was born at the tail end of the decade, but from what I have read and/or asked of those with better recollection:

- Openly racist/sexist
- Drinking, smoking, and eating unhealthy foods were more tolerated
- Religious
- Less globalist/internationalist than today
- Constant fear of nuclear war
- Politically incorrect

In some ways, it was the opposite of today. Today, we're very inclusive of many differing groups. But back then, it was one of the last vestiges of conservative/old-fashioned values.
And there was probably less people diagnosed with anxiety and depression. Were there less of these tendencies, or do people today hide their views better? I grew up in a mixed community: people of European, African, Asian (especially Indian) descent. There were Christian churches, a Jewish synagogue and a Hindu Temple, and even a Christian church with its worship in Korean. I distinctly recall a young man who was born in Saudi Arabia being best friends with a Jewish American youth.
Rodger is offline  
Remove Ads
Old October 15th, 2017, 09:49 PM   #22
Archivist
 
Joined: Dec 2016
From: SAN
Posts: 112

Daily life, work, driving, waiting hours for gas, thinking America was in decline, was all unhappy time in our lives. That lead to the disco music and some cool movies. Happy distractions.

Was a not a great American decade, but some industries probably did alright. I think electronics surged in that era.
DaveTheWriter is offline  
Old November 18th, 2017, 07:50 PM   #23

larkin's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 3,588
Blog Entries: 6

The drinking age was lifted from 18 to 21
larkin is offline  
Old November 19th, 2017, 01:17 AM   #24
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,268

I was 15 in 1970 and my memories of the decade (seem to be) fairly fresh. I suppose the OP is mainly about the social situation in USA, or more broadly the West; I was in the UK so I offer my memories of the point of view from there.

I saw a book written in 1980 about the 1970s, and it began by saying the decade was like the morning after a good party when all that is left is a mess and you are suffering a headache. The general tone (of the media output) of the 1960s was optimism (or so it seemed to me as a child at that time), whereas in the 1970s it became a succession of crises with high inflation (reached 26% in UK in 1976), strikes (the miners went out in 1972 and there were power cuts), and low economic growth (or even shrinkage). Unemployment became quite high, which was very unfortunate because, in the 1950s and 1960s, it had been thought that the dreadful unempolyment of the 1930s (still fresh in the memory of the middle-aged at the time) had been put behind us. For myself, I was able to find stable work fairly quickly, but it seemed that there was always a need to restrain our wages, despite price inflation, and I remember it as a rather dreary period financially.

I believe that the post-war rise in prosperity, while good in itself, lead to millions of ordinary people being determined to get their share. Again, that is not bad in itself, but it was a case of more debt, more strikes to increase wages, and more dissatisfaction for those who just could not afford all those nice things that they saw in the shops. (From letters I read in the newspapers at the time, the older generation would say something like "The problem is that you young people seem to want everything at once, when we were young we saved for years before we could afford a fridge, never mind a television or, good heavens, an automatic washing machine").

I remember smoking being very prevalent then, in particular I remember an office meeting in a smallish room at work, and at the end other colleagues saw us come out in a great cloud of smoke. Car ownership increased a lot, and the towns and cities were simply not designed for that. New huge road-building programs, could make commuting very bad. Publicly owned bus services, though still more extensive than now, were very unreliable.

In my part of the UK I remember some dreadfully cold winters, which we never seem to get nowadays (I don't miss them), although there was one unbelievably hot dry summer in 1976. Overall the weather was remarkably bad (but it's not often nice in UK).

The strait-laced attitudes (arguably) around sex in the 1950s had been loosened in the 1960s, but things, I feel, went rather too far in the 1970s, the result being excessive sexism and, apparently, too much sexual abuse.

Fashion, after the colourful 1960s, seemed to go quite drab in the 1970s (younger people might get the impression of extreme flamboyance, from videos of performers at the time, but on the streets it wasn't really like that). Still, for young people like me, the music was quite good, with very good disco and soul music, also Abba, Bee Gees and others, who have stood the test of time, and some really good progressive rock. Unfortunately the vomit called punk rock appeared on the scene later on.

So overall not a great time, but there again I have some fond memories from those days. It's nice being young! For the older generation, who had experienced the depression, at least one world war, post-war rationing, very bad working conditions, together with the ever-prevalent smoke from the evil weed, there must have been a lot of the misery of poor health for them.

Last edited by fascinating; November 19th, 2017 at 01:43 AM.
fascinating is online now  
Old November 30th, 2017, 09:57 AM   #25

David Vagamundo's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jan 2010
From: Atlanta, Georgia USA
Posts: 3,145

Quote:
Originally Posted by fascinating View Post
. . .
The strait-laced attitudes (arguably) around sex in the 1950s had been loosened in the 1960s, but things, I feel, went rather too far in the 1970s, the result being excessive sexism and, apparently, too much sexual abuse. . . .

.
I was going to post about sex in the 70s: few STDs, no AIDS=lots of sex. I sometimes joke that whenever two or three people were alone in a room back then, they were expected to have had sex. That's somewhat of an exaggeration, but there's some truth in it.
David Vagamundo is offline  
Old November 30th, 2017, 04:28 PM   #26
Historian
 
Joined: Apr 2017
From: Las Vegas, NV USA
Posts: 1,225

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Vagamundo View Post
I was going to post about sex in the 70s: few STDs, no AIDS=lots of sex. I sometimes joke that whenever two or three people were alone in a room back then, they were expected to have had sex. That's somewhat of an exaggeration, but there's some truth in it.
No AIDs but scabies and the "clap". Sometimes young ladies didn't take their pill. And then there was Daddy who showed up a the worst time.

Last edited by stevev; November 30th, 2017 at 04:31 PM.
stevev is offline  
Old December 23rd, 2017, 06:58 PM   #27
Historian
 
Joined: Jul 2013
From: San Antonio, Tx
Posts: 8,377

Quote:
Originally Posted by notgivenaway View Post
I was born at the tail end of the decade, but from what I have read and/or asked of those with better recollection:

- Openly racist/sexist
- Drinking, smoking, and eating unhealthy foods were more tolerated
- Religious
- Less globalist/internationalist than today
- Constant fear of nuclear war
- Politically incorrect

In some ways, it was the opposite of today. Today, we're very inclusive of many differing groups. But back then, it was one of the last vestiges of conservative/old-fashioned values. Speaking from a British standpoint, that decade was a bad one both economically and politically, with numerous strikes and industrial actions, and the fact the UK was really falling behind other big economies. It needed somebody like Thatcher to turn it around. But even for countries at the time that were doing better economically, like the USA, it was marked time. Watergate, the oil crisis, etc. are prime examples.
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevev View Post
No AIDs but scabies and the "clap". Sometimes young ladies didn't take their pill. And then there was Daddy who showed up a the worst time.

Donít forget about the disease of the decade: Herpes.
royal744 is offline  
Old December 24th, 2017, 06:05 AM   #28

Rodger's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jun 2014
From: US
Posts: 3,477

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Vagamundo View Post
I was going to post about sex in the 70s: few STDs, no AIDS=lots of sex. I sometimes joke that whenever two or three people were alone in a room back then, they were expected to have had sex. That's somewhat of an exaggeration, but there's some truth in it.
Don't forget about Hep C. I was in my doctor's office and one of the pharmaceutical companies was rolling a video on Hep C. It stated that 1 in 30 baby boomers (born 1945-1965) have Hep C, and that it could have been contracted in the 1970s and often lies dormant for years. I immediately thought about all the "free" sex of the 70s, which from my perspective, was more prevalent then - as compared to the 60s (the sexual revolution may have started in the late 60s, but most people did not enjoy its "fruits" until the 70s).
Rodger is offline  
Old December 24th, 2017, 06:10 AM   #29

Rodger's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jun 2014
From: US
Posts: 3,477

On a lighter note, when I think of the 70s around Christmas, I think of all those old time Christmas decorations: Most people had a creche - outdoors and indoors. Outdoor lights consisted of green and red bulbs, a tacky santa, rudolph and frosty plastic outdoor statues. Even though they were kind of tacky, when I see this display today (yes, some people still put their old time decorations up), my heart warms. I actually prefer those decorations of childhood to the ones today, which are often non-traditional colors and designs. And, as for Christmas trees, most people still had a live tree. The artificial ones were rather poorly constructed - looking nothing like a real tree. The fun was in going out with your family and choosing, then cutting it down. It was a much simpler time for sure.

Last edited by Rodger; December 24th, 2017 at 06:13 AM.
Rodger is offline  
Old December 28th, 2017, 08:25 AM   #30
Historian
 
Joined: Jul 2013
From: San Antonio, Tx
Posts: 8,377

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodger View Post
On a lighter note, when I think of the 70s around Christmas, I think of all those old time Christmas decorations: Most people had a creche - outdoors and indoors. Outdoor lights consisted of green and red bulbs, a tacky santa, rudolph and frosty plastic outdoor statues. Even though they were kind of tacky, when I see this display today (yes, some people still put their old time decorations up), my heart warms. I actually prefer those decorations of childhood to the ones today, which are often non-traditional colors and designs. And, as for Christmas trees, most people still had a live tree. The artificial ones were rather poorly constructed - looking nothing like a real tree. The fun was in going out with your family and choosing, then cutting it down. It was a much simpler time for sure.
I remember going with my family on a drive in a very snowy and cold Canadian winter and chopping down a Christmas tree with my father and brothers and then hauling it back to the house on top of the car. That tree doubtless belonged to someone who owned the property it was on but I blame my father!
royal744 is offline  
Reply

  Historum > Themes in History > Art and Cultural History

Tags
1970, 1980, culture, culture or society



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ming Culture and Society mingming Asian History 12 July 14th, 2015 05:46 AM
Curious.. What does this artwork say about american society and culture? ritad American History 7 December 15th, 2014 12:18 PM
International Society for Archaeoastronomy and Astronomy in Culture davu Natural Environment 0 August 1st, 2011 06:39 AM
Society: Death of a Culture Isoroku295 Philosophy, Political Science, and Sociology 9 December 1st, 2010 02:19 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.