Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > Themes in History > Art and Cultural History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

Art and Cultural History Art and Cultural History Forum - Music, Literature, Mythology, Visual Arts, Sports, Popular Culture


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old July 21st, 2010, 01:28 PM   #11

leakbrewergator's Avatar
Tiger of Kai
 
Joined: Apr 2010
From: Milford, OH
Posts: 6,272
Blog Entries: 32
Re: Russian history alluded to in baseball telecast


Nah, I think it has more to do with the fact that he is incredibly annoying.
leakbrewergator is offline  
Remove Ads
Old July 21st, 2010, 01:30 PM   #12

tjadams's Avatar
Epicurean
 
Joined: Mar 2009
From: Texas
Posts: 25,362
Blog Entries: 6
Re: Russian history alluded to in baseball telecast


McCarver was at best, a marginal catcher and predominately a NL biased guy.
He is Mets-Yankee guy no doubt. He's been known to say things firstly and think later. He might mean something to fans up north, but to me, I dread it when I hear his voice commenting on a game I'm watching.
tjadams is offline  
Old July 21st, 2010, 03:38 PM   #13
Citizen
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 4
Re: Russian history alluded to in baseball telecast


Robert Frost wrote a great epitaph for himself, that actually appears on his tombstone: "I had a lover's quarrel with the world". Well, I have a lover's quarrel with the United States because it constantly elevates and rewards the mediocre, and disparages or even punishes the truly talented. I think the former infuriates me even more than the latter.

A telling case in point is Joe Buck.

Joe Buck has single-handedly destroyed baseball on the national level (it's Buck, not cable TV or the internet, that has driven people away from the World Series), yet he is constantly praised as the quintessential broadcaster. But even a desultory analysis reveals that he lacks every quality a sane person would desire in a broadcaster.

Not only does he not cleverly find the drama lurking in pedestrian events as a skillful announcer would, but his drab monotone and colorless descriptions drain all interest, let alone excitement, from the most riveting plays. Does he foolishly think dull dispassion is the way to achieve "neutrality" or does he simply have a dead soul?

Vin Scully, Ralph Kiner, et al. are as much raconteurs as play-by-play-ers, as a great broadcaster must be--has Joe Buck ever had a relevant, insightful story to tell?

I don't demand that a baseball announcer amuse the audience like Bob Uecker, but has Buck ever showed himself capable of making the tiniest joke or engaging in more than the most insipid, juvenile banter?

McCarver's critics, while acknowledging his insights, fault him for sometimes stating the obvious. Has anything Buck ever said been other than the utterly obvious--and usually the utterly trivial too. Having asked his defenders, I can report that none can quote a single astute comment he's ever made about the game of baseball. One person replied, "Well, I think once, around about 2002, he did say--no, wait, that was Bob Costas."

But all these people who are exhausting themselves in their efforts to denigrate Tim McCarver (who, whatever his faults, tries to offer something original, and thoughtful, and often succeeds), have nothing to say about the scourge of baseball broadcasting, Joe Buck? And think about it--even McCarver's comment that I started this thread with, comparing the Yankees' treatment of Joe Torre to the Russians' expunging the disfavored from photos, though it was probably mistaken in its details, was, overall, a clever, interesting, provocative remark--one that Joe Buck a)is not remotely intelligent enough or informed enough to ever think of making and b)is not nearly audacious or edgy enough to say if he ever did think of it. But all of you revere Buck and revile McCarver.

But, unfortunately, none of this surprises me. It's part of the disturbing trend in the US in the past few decades to stigmatize those who have the gall to be superior. In the old United States, before "the decline and fall", intelligence was celebrated--Einstein had groupies and many successful quiz show contestants had national followings, while nowadays, smart kids even in upscale communities have to be very careful not to appear "too smart". (If it weren't for Asian immigrants and their descendants these past few decades, the US scientific, mathematical, and engineering establishment would have crumbled.) No kid becomes unpopular by being too much like Lindsay Lohan, but even the New York Times TV critic lampooned Jeopardy's record-holder Ken Jennings as a pathetic nerd. And ironically, Jennings is completely un-nerdy--indistinguishable in appearance from a young executive, attractive wife, cute kids, cool under fire, a great sense of humor. It was simply the NY Times critic reflexively disparaging intelligence and intellectual accomplishment as nerdy, the new US norm.
graviton37 is offline  
Old July 22nd, 2010, 06:43 AM   #14

leakbrewergator's Avatar
Tiger of Kai
 
Joined: Apr 2010
From: Milford, OH
Posts: 6,272
Blog Entries: 32
Re: Russian history alluded to in baseball telecast


Thank you for sharing your thoughts on American culture. I'm not too sure what the relevance is for this thread, or why you are getting so worked up over people not liking a mediocre announcer.

Would it make you feel better if I said I liked McCarver?
leakbrewergator is offline  
Old July 22nd, 2010, 09:36 AM   #15

Greyter's Avatar
Scholar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
From: Texas
Posts: 955
Re: Russian history alluded to in baseball telecast


graviton was never faced with the risks inherent about stealing 3rd base. The game is played between the lines. The announcers are paid to talk. If you don't understand, or appreciate, the game then you focus on the sideshow.
Greyter is offline  
Reply

  Historum > Themes in History > Art and Cultural History

Tags
alluded, baseball, russian, telecast



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Who is the best baseball player in history? MafiaMaster Art and Cultural History 87 June 9th, 2015 10:21 AM
Russian history Egor European History 52 May 27th, 2009 12:24 AM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.