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Old January 27th, 2011, 06:31 PM   #1

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A great history, a great advance, a great book!


Blood and Guts: A history of surgery by Richard Hollingham.

This will be a review, but it won't contain any spoilers. :]

This book is a medium sized book with fairly large text with good spacing, making it an easy read. It is not, however, an easy read.
This book get into very gory details of the medical advances throughout history.
It begins not too long ago in 1842, with an amputation of someone's leg. (That's all I'll say.)
The book is what I would call Creative Non-Fiction. It shows facts in a fun and interesting way that I'm sure you'll all agree on, we all wish our school history text books were written.
The transitions are fabulous, going from the 19th-century, all the way to 157 AD.
For anyone who is interested in history, medicine or surgery, I think it would be a nice book.
Just, don't read it too soon after lunch :/
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Old January 27th, 2011, 06:36 PM   #2

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Wait I am confused:

"The transitions are fabulous, going from the 19th-century, all the way to 157 AD."

Are you saying the book goes in backwards order?
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Old January 27th, 2011, 06:39 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Pancho35 View Post
Wait I am confused:

"The transitions are fabulous, going from the 19th-century, all the way to 157 AD."

Are you saying the book goes in backwards order?
Seems like it.
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Old January 27th, 2011, 07:22 PM   #4

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[ame="http://www.amazon.com/Blood-Guts-History-Richard-Hollingham/dp/0312575467"]Amazon.com: Blood and Guts: A History of Surgery (9780312575465): Richard Hollingham: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Z8FPXWZ2L.@@AMEPARAM@@51Z8FPXWZ2L[/ame]

There's an odd side to me that does find the human inner workings, and the look inside the body, to be fascinating. Thanks for this book.
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Old January 27th, 2011, 07:38 PM   #5

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I don't know why, but there is a large part of me that for some reason has no desire whatsoever to know just what's inside of me and what it looks like. It's a good thing men of science and medicine of the ages did not have such a squeamish and close-minded way of looking at the workings of the human body.
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Old January 29th, 2011, 08:07 PM   #6

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Well, actually, the book doesn't only go backwards, but it skips around.
By the end of the first part, it's mentioning WHERE the doctor got his ideas from, which was 157 AD. Then it does to that time period, talking about the influential doctor. And the end of that mentions when his work started to get real feedback/ questions.
...is this making sense?
Sorry for any confusion.
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Old January 29th, 2011, 08:31 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TasteOfTorment View Post
Well, actually, the book doesn't only go backwards, but it skips around.
By the end of the first part, it's mentioning WHERE the doctor got his ideas from, which was 157 AD. Then it does to that time period, talking about the influential doctor. And the end of that mentions when his work started to get real feedback/ questions.
...is this making sense?
Sorry for any confusion.
To be honest, I first thought this book was about General Patton ...

Anyhow, the dates mentioned in your posts suggest that Mr. Hollinmgham was writing about Dr. James Syme, the surgeon that performed the first successful ankle disarticulation, probably as inspired by Galen of Pergamon and his experience as a surgeon of the local gladiators.
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Old January 29th, 2011, 08:48 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by sylla1 View Post
To be honest, I first thought this book was about General Patton ...

Anyhow, the dates mentioned in your posts suggest that Mr. Hollinmgham was writing about Dr. James Syme, the surgeon that performed the first successful ankle disarticulation, probably as inspired by Galen of Pergamon and his experience as a surgeon of the local gladiators.
Me, too!
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