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Old November 23rd, 2012, 03:17 AM   #161

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Well, this lady could definitely sing the blues...

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Old November 23rd, 2012, 03:18 AM   #162

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Rory Gallagher was a true pioneer of blues rock. A story I heard recently was that Jimi Hendrix was at the same festival as Rory and the interviewer asked Hendrix what it feels like to be the world's best guitarist. Ever modest, Hendrix replied, "Oh I don't know, go and ask Rory Gallagher". It's a shame he doesn't get the recognition he deserves.

As for me, well, I couldn't do without this music. Good clip of Gary Moore and B.B King, Von Ranke and did you know that the Les Paul Gary Moore is playing is none other than Peter Green's famous "Magic" guitar? All of those early 1958/59 models squawk, but Green's had an accidentally modified front pickup which caused that out of phase, nasal squawk. More of it here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUaevnP1LLg

I'd trade my missus to get my hands on that guitar even for 5 minutes. Mind you, I'd trade her for a pound of coconuts

Talking of blues, I was thinking of hiring her out to bluesmen who have lost their "mojo". She can be a blues inspiration machine

It's OK, she never reads this stuff.....
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 10:19 AM   #163

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Thanks for that Black Dog two of the finest and Peter Green's Les Paul could not have ended up in finer hands than those of Gary Moore. Peter and Eric Clapton both served their apprenticeships with John Mayal's Bluesbreakers and while Eric went on to have a great career and a fantastic catalogue of songs, Peter's progress was halted through a mixture of acid and mental health issues. Personally speaking I think Peter was as good if not better than Slowhand and he pushed the boundaries of blues lyics right to the edge. Who else would have come up with the line " I wish I had never been born. " from his song Man of the World ? :

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Old November 23rd, 2012, 10:58 AM   #164

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As a guitarist, I consider Green to be the best. The "less is more" approach. I've spoken to people who've played Old Greeny (as the guitar is known), and they all said that actually, it's nothing special. It has a neck like a tree trunk split in two, and it was rather battered by the time Peter acquired it. He himself didn't like the guitar apart from its sound- his hands are not big enough.

But some people just have that magic touch, and its true to say that that Les Paul and Green are probably the best loved combination of man and guitar in the world. I mean, who hasn't heard Albatross? (Although that was all played by Green, he maintains that the "slide" part was a Fender Stratocaster played across his knee.).

I must shut up about guitars
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 02:32 PM   #165

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Dog View Post

I must shut up about guitars
.. slaps Black dog, oi dont be silly lad, this is the stuff of dreams
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 03:30 PM   #166

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@olly, I will as soon as I get the chance!
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 05:06 PM   #167

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We must have a wealth of musical talent lurking these boards Mick, we could start a band
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 06:42 PM   #168

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Originally Posted by Von Ranke View Post
Thanks for that Black Dog two of the finest and Peter Green's Les Paul could not have ended up in finer hands than those of Gary Moore. Peter and Eric Clapton both served their apprenticeships with John Mayal's Bluesbreakers and while Eric went on to have a great career and a fantastic catalogue of songs, Peter's progress was halted through a mixture of acid and mental health issues. Personally speaking I think Peter was as good if not better than Slowhand and he pushed the boundaries of blues lyics right to the edge. Who else would have come up with the line " I wish I had never been born. " from his song Man of the World ? :

Fleetwood Mac - Man of the world - YouTube
I remember Peter Green playing at the Ritz at Manchester along with Cozy Powell and Jimmy page a great small gig.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 08:46 PM   #169

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Thanks for the BB King/Garry Moore link an outstanding performance.

Sadly I'd heard little of Moore until his death I guess he never toured this far west.

A small contribution-Clapton isn't my favourite but Doyle Bramhall is.


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Old November 24th, 2012, 02:25 AM   #170

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For those who are interested, here's the truth about Peter Green's (and, later, Gary Moore's) famous 1958 Les Paul's strange tone.

An electric guitar has pickups, to convert the string's vibration into an electrical signal which can then be amplified. A pickup is basically a coil (or coils) of wire and a permanent magnet. As Michael Faraday taught us, when a steel or iron object is inserted into a magnetic field, it creates a small electrical current.

As usual, there are several schools of thought about how best to do this with guitars. Fender (makers of some of the most iconic guitars ever) tended to favour pickups with a single coil of wire, and this produces a very clear, bright and almost piano like tone.

The only problem with single coil pickups was that they often produce a 50 to 60 hertz hum.

Gibson, makers of numerous iconic guitars, not least the Les Paul, came up with a pickup with 2 sets of coils and a magnet. These are known as twin coils, and, because they cancelled out the hum, they became more famous as "Humbuckers". Humbuckers are typically lower output than single coils, but because they effectively read more of the string's length (they have a much wider magnetic field), they have a "fatter", often darker tone.

You may not think it, but the wood an electric guitar is made from is important. An electric guitar is nothing more than a plank with 2 anchors for the strings at each end. The more rigid those anchors and the more resonant the wood, the longer the string can vibrate and the better the tone. Different manufacturers have their own theories, but the classic Les Paul was a solid lump of mahogany and with a relatively thin maple "cap" on the top of the guitar body. Mahogany is very resonant, but maple is very hard and heavy, this adds a little brightness to the tone. It also explains why most Les Paul players end up at hunchbacks. It's a very heavy guitar.

So, Peter Green's 1958 Les Paul was already some 9 years old when he bought it. It had been worked pretty hard and was knocked about. Most guitars have 2 or more pickups: where they are placed makes a huge difference. Closer to the neck gives a more rounded tone, towards the rear of the guitar- the bridge- gives a brighter, more treble tone. Watch that Gary Moore and B.B. King clip again and see Gary switching pickups. The pickup switch on a Les Paul is right at the top as you're holding it, on the above the neck pickup.

Anyhow, Peter Green's guitar's front pickup was constantly playing up. Most likely the wires were breaking down. He apparently took it for repair to a man who was far more familiar with repairing Fender, single coil, pickups. This bloke completely re-wired the pickup, but used the wrong wire (he used far thicker "formvar" wire as used on Fenders) and he rotated the wire the wrong way. This made the front pickup "out of phase".

However, this is apparently only when both pickups are used together! The volume levels of both have to be roughly equal. When this occurs, we hear that magical, nasal "squawk" you can briefly hear at 6:15 on the "Thrill has gone" clip above.

Otherwise, the front pickup sounds normal.

There are lots of silly stories in the 'net about flipping the front magnet, but never have I heard of anyone actually doing it. Everybody swears that's how it's done, but nobody ever does it to find out. Not least because if you took apart a proper late 50's PAF Humbucker, you'd be hung, drawn and quartered and buried in several unmarked graves within the hour

Guitarists are weird. They almost all really, really, want guitars that are older than them

A friend of mine recently bought a very good condition 1959 Les Paul from America. He paid.........the price of a second hand Lamborghini. He then flew over to the USA personally and bought a ticket for the guitar to bring it back next to him, rather than risk it through luggage.

His dumb arse is dead if ever his wife finds out, but since she has a thing about £1000 handbags, he has quite a lever on her

I own a set of absolutely authentic PAF pickups (PAF actually means "Patent Applied For" !) with the Peter Green modification. The attention to detail in their manufacture is stunning.
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